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Search result for keyword "Water Quality". 250 results found.

Scaling Up Water Quality Efforts in Iowa

Wallaces Farmer, August 2018

Water Quality Monitoring Program

... taken for total suspended solids and phosphorus. A Hydrolab probe was also used to gather dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, and conductivity data during each visit. Since July 2011, all parameters were sampled monthly through March 2012, when weekly sampling will began again. This sampling occurs at four sites located along Indian Creek and on one tributary. Water quality sampling station locations. US Geological Survey, with financial support from IEPA, installed a stream gage to monitor flow. In September 2011, the nitrate probe was installed. Flow and nitrate data will be taken in real-time every 15 minutes. View the real time data. The gage and probe will collect data through July 2013. For more information contact Trevor Sample. &n ... more.

National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI)

CTIC is currently working with USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) on a project in support of NWQI. This project is identifying successful watershed management activities that engage landowners, farmers, and the broader public to protect water quality. Insights developed through this project will inform future NRCS efforts to support local watershed initiatives with technical and financial resources. As a first step, CTIC is convening watershed leaders from across the country at five forums to learn from their experience—successful or otherwise—with diverse watershed management and communication strategies. Our first forum will ... more.

Whatcom County Dairy Farmers Tackle Water Quality Challenges

Whatcom County Dairy Farmers Tackle Water Quality Challenges Using an innovative online tool to schedule late winter and early spring manure applications, Terry and Troy Lenssen of Lenssen Dairy in Lynden, Washington, can give soil microbes a chance to convert slurry nutrients into plant-available forms before spring growth starts in earnest, while also protecting local waterways from runoff of nutrients and bacteria. The Application Risk Man ... more.

National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI)

CTIC is working with USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to improve the effective engagement by NRCS in delivering watershed projects and to enhance the agency's ability to communicate the issues and success of watershed projects. This project is identifying successful watershed management activities that engage landowners, farmers, and the broader public to protect water quality. Insights developed through this project will inform future NRCS efforts to support local watershed initiatives with technical and financial resources.

MARKET FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENT: WABASH RIVER BASIN WATER QUALITY TRADING

... in the Wabash River watershed identify sources of nutrient loads. Theseinclude agricultural nonpoint source runoff and a variety of permitted point source discharges, including municipal and industrial wastewater discharges, storm water discharges, combined sewer overflows and sanitary sewer overflows. The nutrient issues associated with these sources not only affect local water quality issues, but also drive the Gulf hypoxia problems.Water quality trading is a potential tool for effectively addressing both local water quality issues and downstream Gulf hypoxia issues. This market feasibility analysis will determine if the necessary conditions exist in the Wabash River watershed to support the development and implementation of a viable, sustainable water quality trading program ... more.

Water Quality Trends in Rice

Ron Rice and Luigi Trotta

CUSTOMIZED TRAINING ON WATER QUALITY TRADING FOR AGRICULTURE AND WASTEWATER FACILITIES

Water quality credit trading may be, in many areas,a successful market-based approach to improve water quality. It is an innovative, voluntary tool that connects industrial and municipal facilities, subject to wastewater permit requirements, with agricultural producers to economically achieve water quality improvements. It has the potential to bea flexible and cost-effective approach for maintainin ... more.

WABASH RIVER BASIN WATER QUALITY TRADING FEASIBILITY STUDY

In 2009, CTIC received federal funding to study the feasibility of a water quality credit trading program in the Wabash River basin. Water quality credit trading may prove to be a useful, innovative, market-based approach to bolstering farm income while improving water quality. This voluntary tool connects industrial and municipal facilities with agricultural producers to economically achieve water quality improvements. This concept is beginni ... more.

A Review of BMPs for Managing Crop Nutrients and Conservation Tillage to Improve Water Quality

A Review of BMPs for Managing Crop Nutrients and Conservation Tillage to Improve Water Quality This publication will review research on nutrient management BMPs for the two nutrients of major concern, Nitrogen and Phosphorus, with an emphasis on integrating BMPs with conservation tillage.

PROMOTING COLLABORATIVE, INNOVATIVE LIVESTOCK WASTE MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

Today there are thousands of Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) nationally that require an National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)permit. Producers and their technical service providers need specialized informationand assistance with new technologies to resolve livestock waste management issues and address water quality concerns. Collaborative watershed effortsfocused on managing livestock waste need resourcesto help inform the public and the producers. Project Partner Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 5 Activities This project employs information technology transfer through published articles in CTIC's Partners online magazine, a manure management web si ... more.

Getting Paid for Stewardship: An Agricultural Community Water Quality Trading Guide

Getting Paid for Stewardship: An Agricultural Community Water Quality Trading Guide This guide introduces the elements that are key to the trading process, noting critical questions to keep in mind as you go. References for additional information are also included.

Trading Up for Water Quality

Water quality trading is a valuable concept for the electric and agricultural industries. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recently secured $1.3 million in grants from the EPA and the USDA to launch a regional water quality trading program in the Ohio River Basin. Photo courtesy of EPRI Trading Up for Water Quality Producers and indust ... more.

Trading Up for Water Quality

Trading Up for Water Quality Producers and industry pursue growing interest in the market-based approach of water quality trading By Christy Couch Lee A guide to water quality trading terms: Point-source contributors: A concentrated source of pollution. For example, permitted facilities, such as wastewater treatment plants and electric companies. Nonpoint-source contributors: Pollution that r ... more.

Water Quality Trading Workshop Presentations (August 26-27, 2009)

Speaker Presentations Benefits and Obstacles in Water Quality Trading - George Kelly, Environmental Banc & Exchange Ohio's Great Miami River Watershed - Dusty Hall, The Miami Conservancy District Water Quality Credit Training Workshop - Jim Klang, Kieser & Associates Aggregators: Examples and Opportunities - Jamie McCarthy, Kieser & Associates Sauk River Watershed Ecosystem Services Project - Jim Klang, Kieser & Assoc ... more.

Water Quality Trading Workshop (March 4-5, 2009)

... with its partners, Environmental Trading Network, the International Certified Crop Advisers, the Water Environment Federation, and the Maryland Departments of Agriculture and the Environment, the Conservation Technology Information Center hosted this interactive event as part of Maryland’s public outreach on its newly developed nonpoint-source trading program. Water quality trading is a market-based approach to improve water quality. It is an innovative, voluntary tool that connects industrial and municipal facilities (point sources) with agricultural producers or other landowners (nonpoint sources) to economically achieve water quality improvements and to accommodate growth. It is a flexible and cost-effective approach for maintaining, restoring, or enhancing water ... more.

Water Quality Credit Trading Workshop

Water Quality Credit Trading Workshop August 19 - 20, 2008 Troy-Hayner Cultural Center Troy, Ohio Water Quality Credit Trading programs bring together agriculture and the wastewater community to solve difficult water quality issues.The Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC), in conjunction with the Environmental Trading Network (ETN), the Water Environment Federation (WEF) and Certified ... more.

Water Quality Trading Workshop (July 8-9, 2009)

When: July 8 - 9, 2009 Where: Atwood Lake Resort and Conference Center 2650 Lodge Road Sherrodsville, OH 44675 888-819-8042 **To make reservations - call and reference the Water Quality Workshop to receive the group rate of $89 per night. To view the Agenda, click here. Together with its partners, Environmental Trading Network, the International Certified Crop Advisers, and the Water Environment Federation, the Conservation Technology Information Center will host a Water Quality Credit Trading Workshop at Atwood Lake Resort and Conference Center (30 miles south of Can ... more.

Water Quality Trading Workshop Presentations (July 8-9, 2009)

Water Quality Credit Trading Workshop July 8-9, 2009 Sherrodsville, Ohio Speaker Presentations: Ohio's Water Quality Trading Rules - Gary Stuhlfauth, Ohio EPA Ohio's Great Miami River Watershed - Dusty Hall, The Miami Conservancy District Great Miami River Watershed Water Quality Credit Trading Program - Sarah Hippensteel Community-Based Water Quality Trading: ... more.

2019 CIA Tour

The 2019 CTIC Conservation in Action Tour will be held August 20-21, 2019 in central Iowa. We'll examine a wide range of edge-of-field systems and other conservation practices that help Iowa farmers build soil quality and protect water quality. Details will be posted to this page—save the date and check in periodically for more information. For more information on our past tours, view our archive page.

Past Tours

... the cover crops of the Hmong American Farmers Association farm near Hastings to Northfield farmer Dave Legvold’s saturated buffers and the impeccable dairy and manure handling system at Burfeind Dairy Farm near Goodhue, participants in the Conservation Technology Information Center’s (CTIC) eighth annual Conservation in Action Tour got a first-hand look at systems that protect water quality, build soil health and improve farm profitability. Find out more on our tour wrap-up page. Conservation in Action Tour 2014 Owls, sugarcane, lettuce, muck soils and more are all part of the "Unique Story of the Everglades Agricultural Area," a tale of farmers working with the ecosystem. Over 150 participants from 20 states heard this unique story. The audience represented num ... more.

Terry Lenssen

Location Lyden, WA Documents Whatcom County Dairy Farmers Tackle Water Quality Challenges, Capital Press, February 3, 2017 Images $(document).ready(function(){ $('#terry_lenssen_img img').on('click', function() { $('.enlargeImageModalSource').attr('src', $(this).attr('src')); $('#enlargeImageModal2').modal('show'); }); }); × Click the below images to enlarge them ... more.

Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS)

... Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Task Force. Private-sector players throughout agri-food system supply chains can better understand market trends in the adoption of cover crops and specific tillage systems that impact environmental sustainability, such as GHG emissions and soil carbon sequestration. Conservation organizations can better understand where efforts are most needed to improve soil health and water quality outcomes. ViewOpTIS Data Indiana Pilot Study Ten years of tillage-transect data collected by the State of Indiana were used to verify the ability of OpTIS algorithms to automatically process publicly-available remote sensing data, in order to accurately characterize tillage practices and the presence of winter cover crops. View Resource N ... more.

Indian Creek Watershed Project

Over the course of six years, the Indian Creek Watershed Project proved to be a significant model for voluntary water quality improvement efforts—not just in Livingston County, Illinois, but across the country. Project organizers talked to every single producer in the watershed about conservation practices and water quality, and by the end of the project, conservation systems and best management practices (BMPs) were in place on at least 57% of the agricultural acreage in the Indian Creek drainage. Goals and ... more.

Promoting Conservation

... of the benefits of conservation, providing detailed information on successful implementation of practices, and sharing perspective on the needs and real-world challenges facing farmers trying to protect soil, water and air quality as well as their economic sustainability. Watershed Success Forums Working with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) through the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI), CTIC is identifying successful watershed management activities that engage landowners, farmers, and the broader public to protect water quality. Five forums in five states are yielding a guide for NRCS, partners and stakeholders on organizing local watershed groups and creating successful watershed products. The guide, being prepared by Dr. Linda Prokopy of Purdue University in ... more.

OpTIS: Where Technology Drives Conservation Results

... even more of the crops that clothe, fuel and feed the world. One way to help alleviate this pressure is to significantly improvesoil healthon cropland. By adopting practices like planting winter cover crops and reducing—or better yet eliminating—tillage practices, farmers can significantly improve productivity of their fields, reduce soil erosion, improve water quality and increase carbon storage. In fact, agricultural soils are among the planet's largest reservoirs (orsinks) of carbon. Improving soil on American croplands has the potential to mitigate 25 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions. That’s the equivalent to taking 5 million passenger cars off the road for one year.

Mission

CONNECT CTIC brings people together. We build coalitions. We connect farmers, researchers, policymakers, agribusiness, and lead discussions that move conversations ahead. INFORM CTIC is a clearinghouse for convservation information, from Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) regional trend data to how to implement practices on your farm. ... more.

About

Facilitated by CTIC, local farmers and interested others lead this project to demonstrate and test best conservation practices on Indian Creek Watershed farms. The project, sponsored by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (with funds provided through Section 319 of the Clean Water Act) will show how conservation practices installed on Indian Creek watershed farms will affect water quality. Goal Determine what water quality improvements result when 50-75% of producers and acres in a small watershed adopt comprehensive agriculture conservation systems over a six-year period. Activities Outreach activities include field tours, public meetings, email and website updates, news releases and more. On-farm ... more.

Additional Resources

... Residue Management (CRM) Survey Drainage Water Management Cover Crops Cover Crop Survey Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) Demonstration Projects Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) Grazing and Rangeland Hypoxia Know Your Watershed Leadership Mississippi River Basin Initiative (MRBI) No-Till National Aquatic Resource Survey (NARS) National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) Nutrient Management Operational Tillage Assessment System (OpTIS) Pasture Ridge Till Soil Health Strip Till Tours Training Water Quality Watershed Groups Watershed Implementation and Innovation Network (WIIN) Weed Management Wetlands

2010 Tour Wrap-Up

Participants found out how agriculture protects water quality and improves soil health during the Conservation In Action Tour 2010. WHEN: August 2-3, 2010 WHERE: Williamsburg, Virginia WHAT: Visited farms and farmers in east central Virginia who run profitable operations and provide communities with valuable ecosystem services. Fill out an Evaluation Form from the Conservation In Action Tour ... more.

2012 Tour Wrap-Up

The Conservation In Action Tour keeps growing! On May 31, 2012, nearly 250 participants gathered in the Mississippi Delta to meet and learn from farmers who face unique challenges in water quality, herbicide resistance and wildlife management. The Tour, organized by CTIC and partner Delta F.A.R.M., highlighted innovative conservation practices that producers and partners implement to protect and preserve one of the largest contiguous ecosystems in North America. Producers, agribusiness partners, government officials and media professionals from 26 states across the nation came to Tunica, M ... more.

2015 Tour Wrap-Up

... the cover crops of the Hmong American Farmers Association farm near Hastings to Northfield farmer Dave Legvold’s saturated buffers and the impeccable dairy and manure handling system at Burfeind Dairy Farm near Goodhue, participants in the Conservation Technology Information Center’s (CTIC) eighth annual Conservation in Action Tour got a first-hand look at systems that protect water quality, build soil health and improve farm profitability. What people enjoyed most about the tour: The opportunity to see conservation practices in person and to hear directly from farmers what works and what doesn't. Wide range of practices and respect for variety of approaches. Seeing great practices put into action and hearing inspiring stories from farmer stewards. The diverse ... more.

2016 Tour Wrap-Up

... —- more than 180 crops ranging from potatoes to dairy products to trout.. Farmers, crop consultants, agribusiness professionals, state and federal agency representatives, and conservation group leaders visited four farms to see conservation agriculture and innovative conservation systems up-close. What We Learned: Stop #1 - Dixon Farm, Greenleaf, Idaho Water quality and availability as it impacts high-efficiency irrigation Irrigation/water delivery system Semi-permanent drip irrigation Managing multi-year crops in highly variable soils Stop #2 – M&M Feedlot, Parma, Idaho Business and neighborly impacts of creating an attractive, low-odor environment Air quality and ammonia permits Nutrient and water management &n ... more.

Demonstration: Nitrogen Application Timing

... N to the crop all season long, not just when it's applied, allowing the crop to reach full genetic potential. The unique polymer coating helps prevent against all forms of N loss, including volatilization, denitrification, and leaching. When used correctly, ESN® can substantially reduce N losses to surface water, subsurface drainage water, and groundwater, a positive impact to water quality. Producers! Interested in trying one of our demonstration practices? Contact Terry Bachtold at 815-848-4455. Right Source Match fertilizer type to crop needs Select appropriate nutrient sources for cropping system Test soils Consider N, P, K secondary and micronutrient Consider enhanced efficiency fertilizers Plan nutrient regimen ... more.

Demonstrations

Our demonstrations illustrate the 4 Rs of nutrient management: Right Source Right Rate Right Place Right Time We demonstrate management systems---not individual practices. We measure practice success through agronomic yield, economic sustainability, nutrient use efficiency and water quality impacts. Agrium's ESN v. Urea Agrium designed ESN®, a polymer coated urea, to slow the release of nitrogen into the environment. This is allows the plant to access nitrogen when it needs it the most... Read more. Application Timing We designed this study to demonstrate the differences in nitrogen rates and yields with different urea application ... more.

National Aquatic Resource Surveys

... programs between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), states and tribes that assess the quality of the nation's inland and coastal waters, providing vital data that can help guide conservation efforts on the landscape. CTIC works with EPA and its partners on technical training to carry out NARS assessments, and to promote conservation systems that help protect and improve water quality. Through articles, videos and other media, we hope to inform farmers and landowners about water quality issues, inspire them to adopt practices that help address those challenges, and show their neighbors the steps that these dedicated stewards are taking to protect and improve our nation's water resources. View individual cases using the menu

Promoting Conservation Back Button

CTIC Projects « Promoting Conservation « NARS Water Quality Spotlights

Tour Agenda

... – 7:00 pm Evening Social – ACRE September 6 7:00 am Registration and Box Breakfast Pick-up – Purdue Union 7:30 am Depart Purdue Union 8:00 – 9:30 am Purdue Dairy –West Lafayette, Indiana Managing manure and nutrients to protect water quality Nutrient recycling strategies and management plan Herd/dairy management and research 10:00 am – 1:00 pm Muller Farm –Oxford, Indiana Drainage water management Big Pine Creek watershed project Drainage water management system Absentee landowner Lunch(Muller Farm) ... more.

Helping People, Land and Water: The Cover Crop Story

What do farms, water quality and the Great Lakes have in common? They all are helped by cover crops. Through the Great Lakes Cover Crop Initiative, CTIC and partners planted 36,970 acres of cover crops, providing many benefits to farmers in the Great Lakes region. Hear from three farmers in the Great Lakes basin, a researcher on Lake Erie and a Michigan State University Extension educator as they present "The Cover Crop ... more.

Bioenergy Productions

Argonne National Laboratory found a home for its biomass test site on the Ray Popejoy farm in the Indian Creek watershed. Argonne is exploring the potential for farmers to employ underused or marginal land to produce crops for biomass energy. Factors studied include economic potential and water quality benefits. As this project moves forward, funding from the Department of Energy is expected to support the scientific investigation and field study. Agribusiness will assist with identifying potential supply chain participants. The project will address: the disconnection between producers and users (potential new conversion facilities are constrained by the lack of lignocel ... more.

CTIC in the News

Scaling Up Water Quality Efforts in Iowa Wallaces Farmer, August 2018 Landowners Support Cover Crops Corn and Soybean Digest, August 2018 Time Is Money Corn and Soybean Digest, July 2018 Nitrogen Cycling and Cover Crops Corn and Soybean Digest, June 2018 All In On Cover Crop Corn and Soybean Digest, April 2018 Study Links Best Manag ... more.

Sustainable Supply Chains

... footprint of their raw materials, stakeholders throughout the agri-food supply chain are working diligently to quantify and benchmark sustainability. CTIC is a partner in several initiatives to bring together participants from various points in the supply chain to develop metrics and processes that provide useful insight and fit into real-world, on-farm management systems. Big Pine Watershed Water Quality Metric Trial CTIC is assisting Field to Market with a small-scale pilot of an improved water quality metric for Field to Market's FieldPrint Calculator. This effort will leverage relationships developed through the Big Pine Watershed project to collect farm management data and farmer feedback on the new metric. Supporting Supply Chain Sustainability CTIC recently began a new phase of a p ... more.

CTIC project updates

... completing a successful pilot year in 2017, Bee Integrated is on track to enroll additional farmer-beekeeper pairs this spring. The project’s first year yielded valuable insight into what it takes to integrate individual best practices into a practical system for working farms and beekeeping operations. Contact Mike Smith at smith@ctic.org for more information. National Water Quality Initiative: CTIC is currently working with USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) on a project in support of the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI). This project is identifying successful watershed management activities that engage landowners, farmers, and the broader public to protect water quality. Insights developed through this project will inform future NRCS effort ... more.

CTIC project updates

... system of best practices to improve pollinator health outcomes. After completing a successful pilot year in 2017, Bee Integrated is on track to enroll additional farmer-beekeeper pairs this spring. The project’s first year yielded valuable insight into what it takes to integrate individual best practices into a practical system for working farms and beekeeping operations. National Water Quality Initiative: CTIC is currently working with USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) on a project in support of the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI). This project is identifying successful watershed management activities that engage landowners, farmers, and the broader public to protect water quality. Insights developed through this project will inform future NRCS effort ... more.

…and looking forward to 2018!

... Tour will be held in the Maryland/Washington D.C. area this summer. Plans are already underway, and we’re thrilled to share more information with you in the coming months. Working with USDA on a project to highlight successful strategies for organizing local watershed protection efforts that engage local stakeholders and effectively communicate how agriculture is actively addressing water quality concerns. Helping farmers and members of the supply chain document how they are sustainably providing commodities to downstream partners and how farming more sustainably can have a positive impact on the farmer’s bottom line. Working with partners to implement a remote sensing project that can help to estimate crop residue amounts and cover crop acreage using satellite photos and public ... more.

CTIC project updates

... diet was supplied by habitat this project established on participating farms. The DNA identification method used is new and developed partially through this project’s support. These pollen ID results are on track to be delivered later this spring and are expected to provide the greatest indicator of our success providing cost-effective on-farm pollinator habitat. National Water Quality Initiative: CTIC is currently working with USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) on a project in support of the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI). This project is identifying successful watershed management activities that engage landowners, farmers, and the broader public to protect water quality. Insights developed through this project will inform future NRCS effort ... more.

CTIC project updates

... system of best practices to improve pollinator health outcomes. After completing a successful pilot year in 2017, Bee Integrated is on track to enroll additional farmer-beekeeper pairs this spring. The project’s first year yielded valuable insight into what it takes to integrate individual best practices into a practical system for working farms and beekeeping operations. National Water Quality Initiative: CTIC is currently working with USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) on a project in support of the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI). This project is identifying successful watershed management activities that engage landowners, farmers, and the broader public to protect water quality. Insights developed through this project will inform future NRCS effort ... more.

CTIC Project Updates

... diet was supplied by habitat this project established on participating farms. The DNA identification method used is new and developed partially through this project's support. These pollen ID results are on track to be delivered later this spring and are expexted to provide the greatest indicator of our success providing cost-effective on-farm pollinator habitat. National Water Quality Initiative: CTIC is currently working with USDA's Natural Recources Conservation Service (NRCS) on a project in support of the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI). This project is identifying successful watershed management activities that engage landowners, farmers, and the broader public to protect water quality. Insights developed through this project will inform future NRCS effort ... more.

National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS)

... National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) program is an EPA and State/Tribal effort to survey the condition of the nation’s waters. Initiated in 2005, these statistically-based surveys have begun to provide EPA, States, Tribes and others partners with information to provide nationally consistent reports on the condition of the nation’s waters, to identify national and regional water quality priorities and to evaluate the effectiveness of the nation’s investment in water quality protection and restoration. These assessments report on core indicators of aquatic life and public health using standardized field and laboratory methods and a national quality control program. The NARS reports provide unbiased estimates of the condition of the broader population of a water resource ... more.

Ag Consulting Trainings

... Public Library Topics of discussion Identify symptoms suggesting need for conservation - Mike Taylor, Farmer (30 min) Selecting right practices - John Lee, NRCS (90 min) Resources for technical support - Keith Scoggins, NRCS Selecting a contractor - Keith Scoggins, NRCS Arkansas’ nutrient reduction strategy and how practices covered by this training protect water quality - Ken Brazil, Arkansas Natural Resources Commission (15-30 min) Wednesday August 23 8:00 AM—Check-in, coffee and donuts at Stuttgart Public Library 8:30 AM—Bus departs for Terry Dabbs’ farm Outdoors on the farm Discovery Farms: Water quality monitoring as a driver of voluntary conservation adoption - Mike Daniels, Arkansas Discov ... more.

Projects side column (Cover Crop)

Ag Consultant Training in Systems that Protect Water Quality National Aquatic Resources Workshop National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) Cover Crop Surveys

Projects submenu (optis)

Ag Consultant Training in Systems that Protect Water Quality National Aquatic Resources Workshop National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) Cover Crop Surveys

Projects

Ag Consultant Training in Systems that Protect Water Quality National Aquatic Resources Workshop National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI)Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) Cover Crop Surveys

Projects side menu (NARS)

Ag Consultant Training in Systems that Protect Water Quality National Aquatic Resources Workshop National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI)Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) Cover Crop Surveys

Project side menu (Ag Consultant)

Ag Consultant Training in Systems that Protect Water Quality National Aquatic Resources Workshop National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) Cover Crop Surveys

...and looking forward to 2018!

... Tour will be held in the Maryland/Washington D.C. area this summer. Plans are already underway, and we’re thrilled to share more information with you in the coming months. Working with USDA on a project to highlight successful strategies for organizing local watershed protection efforts that engage local stakeholders and effectively communicate how agriculture is actively addressing water quality concerns. Helping farmers and members of the supply chain document how they are sustainably providing commodities to downstream partners and how farming more sustainably can have a positive impact on the farmer’s bottom line. Working with partners to implement a remote sensing project that can help to estimate crop residue amounts and cover crop acreage using satellite photos and public ... more.

Don't forget to renew your membership

Have you checked your mailbox for CTIC’s annual membership renewal notice? Renewing your membership helps us continue to make a difference in conservation agriculture and helps us continue to grow our organization. CTIC members play a critical role in spreading the message about how conservation practices can help improve soil and water quality, boost profitability and more. We couldn’t do it without you! As a CTIC member, you: Network with leaders in conservation and agriculture Collaborate on projects that encourage and steer conservation efforts Access the latest research and information Gain national recognition for your support of agricultural conservation. Have recognition on CTIC's w ... more.

Workshop

Practical Conservation Planning in the Field August 22-23, 2017 Stuttgart Public Library Stuttgard, Arkansas Ph: 870-673-1966 This workshop will provide CCAs and other ag consultants with the foundation to recognize opportunities for reducing their clients’ impact on water quality. The majority of the day will be spent with three speakers—representing industry, agency, and academia—who will lend their expertise to give a complete perspective on a set of edge of field practices. Attendees will also learn about in-field nutrient management for improved water quality. The workshop is free, however, registration is required. REGISTER HERE   ... more.

2010 NLA Workshop

2010 NLA Workshop November 1-2, 2010 Oklahoma City, OK Draft Agenda November 1, 2010 1:00 - 1:30 pm 2012 NLA overview,Amina Pollard, EPA Each indicator group will have two hours to present their analysis of potential indicators for the 2012 lakes survey and discuss their thoughts with the steering committee. 1:30 - 3:30 pm Water Quality Indicators 3:30 - 5:30 pm Physical Habitat Indicators November 2, 2010 9:00 - 11:00 am Biological Indicators 11:00 - 12:30 pm Lunch (on own) 12:30 - 2:30 pm Recreational Indicators 2:30 - 4:00 pm Recap, discussion and next steps,Amina Pollard, EPA

May 1 and May 2, 2014

Cincinnati, Ohio This training was co-located with the National Water Quality Monitoring Council’s (NWQMC) Conference in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 28-May 2. The R training was a one day, interactive session held on May 1 or May 2, 2014 and focused on the analysis of NARS data using the R computing language. Topics included: Data preparation: building a state-level dataset. How to compute population estimates of the ecological condition of aquatic systems ... more.

2012 Workshop

... training and tools so that States, Tribes and other partners can build their capacity to implement aquatic resource surveys at multiple scales (data management, analysis, interpretation). Provide examples of how to use the aquatic resource survey methodology to inform state and tribal needs at multiple scales. The NARS Workshops and Trainings were held in conjunction with the 8th National Water Quality Monitoring Conference (NWQMC).

Key Practices

Terry and Troy Lenssen of Lenssen Dairy in Lynden, Washington, safeguard water quality in a variety of ways, including: The Application Risk Management tool from Whatcom Conservation District, which puts their information through an algorithm to determine the risk of a manure application during the wet winter or early spring. Risk analysis, conducted with their local conservation district. “Relay cropping,” 30 to 50 pounds of Italian ryegrass or cereal rye blow ... more.

Ecological Challenges

Farmers in Washington’s Whatcom County are engaged in a wide range of water quality improvement projects. TMDLs (total maximum daily loads) in local waterways cover fecal coliform, ammonia-nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, chlorine and temperature. The presence of commercial shellfish beds not far from the mouth of the Nooksack River puts added pressure on farmers and shellfish harvesters to work together on water quality improvements. The U.S. Environmental Protection ... more.

Workshops

... PM - Stuttgart Public Library Topics of discussion Identify symptoms suggesting need for conservation - Mike Taylor, Farmer (30 min) Selecting right practices - John Lee, NRCS (90 min) Resources for technical support - Keith Scoggins, NRCS Selecting a contractor - Keith Scoggins, NRCS Arkansas’ nutrient reduction strategy and how practices covered by this training protect water quality - Ken Brazil, Arkansas Natural Resources Commission (15-30 min) Wednesday August 23 8:00 AM - Check-in, coffee and donuts at Stuttgart Public Library 8:30 AM—Bus departs for Terry Dabbs’ farm Outdoors on the farm Discovery Farms: Water quality monitoring as a driver of voluntary conservation adoption - Mike Daniels, Arkansas Discovery Farms (30 mins.) Dabbs Farm: ... more.

2018 CONSERVATION IN ACTION TOUR

CTIC's 11th annual Conservation in Action Tour is heading to the eastern shore! Join us in Maryland as we visit part of the country's largest estuary, the Chesapeake Bay, to get a front row view of how the area is leading the way in innovative conservation to improve water quality.

FROM THE FIELD

The Indian Creek Watershed Project demonstrated the power of voluntary conservation practices to impact local water quality. Hear local farmers explain how their community banded together to put conservation systems into action.

Dow AgroSciences

Focusing on environmental stewardship and education Dow AgroSciences joined CTIC as a Gold Corporate Member during the summer of 2013. The company uses technology to conserve natural resources and provide educational tools. Dow AgroSciences nitrogen stabilizers, Instinct and N-Serve, are used as a best management practice for improving groundwater quality, optimizing plant nutrients and supporting environmental stewardship. Both products contain the same unique active ingredient to help reduce nitrate leaching into ground and surface water. This ingredient also helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions and makes more nitrogen available to plants. Jason Moulin, portfolio marketing leader for Dow AgroSciences, noted that technology such as nitrog ... more.

The Mosaic Company

... Foundation invest in partnerships with best-in-class organizations to promote many aspects of conservation, including nutrient stewardship, habitat conservation and watershed restoration. For example, The Mosaic Company Foundation supports The Nature Conservancy’sGreat Rivers Partnershipthrough science-based work with farmers and partners to improve water quality in three key agricultural watersheds in the Upper Mississippi River Basin – Minnesota’s Root River, Iowa’s Boone River and Illinois’ Mackinaw River.Additionally, The Mosaic Company supports theFlorida Farm Bureau’s CARES program, which recognizes superior natural resource conservation by agricultural producers.Since its inception in 2001, more than ... more.

SAVE THE DATE

Mark your calendar for the 2013 Conservation In Action Tour, July 9 and 10 in Livingston County, Ill. We’ll be visiting the hub of several outstanding watershed conservation projects, with stops at demonstration plots, on-farm trials and in-stream water quality testing stations. More than 40 percent of the farm acreage in the 80-square-mile watershed is enrolled in conservation programs, and many of the watershed’s 160 farmers are on the CTIC-facilitated Indian Creek Watershed Project advisory board. That dramatic level of involvement was the subject of the webinar that launched the Great Rivers/Upstream Heroes Waters ... more.

Illinois Environmental Protection Agency

Illinois EPA and other partners will conduct water quality monitoring in the watershed to document and determine if conservation practices are making a difference. This project funded in part by IL EPA through Section 319 of the Clean Water Act.

Agri Drain

Agri Drain is a leader in agricultural drainage management systems. Our industry provides practice and product based solutions across our great nation. We can help offset the impact of weather, improve water quality and availability, reduce flooding, create wildlife habitat, and keep our farmers productive and profitable.

New Leader

The New Leader line of crop nutrient applicators from Highway Equipment Company is an integral part of fertilizer handling - vital for improving water quality and farm sustainability in the Mississippi River Basin. "Right place" is one of the 4Rs of nutrient stewardship, and New Leader equipment is proud of its role in promoting and enabling that key tactic.

WATERSHED NETWORKING SESSIONS AND WORKSHOPS

... Information Technology Center (CTIC) partnered to provide information to watershed professionals throughout the state of Indiana. Below you can find agendas and presentations from those events. Managing Runoff Networking Session December 2009 Presentations Riparian Forest Buffers Wetland and Stream Restoration 2 Stage Ditch Water Quality Monitoring Workshop October 2009 Agenda Presentations Which Data Are Important and Why Using Data to Support Watershed Protection & Restoration Decisions Watershed Planning and Management Water Quality Standards & Other Regulatory Issues Permitting, Funding and Project Coordination Integrating Watershed Man ... more.

Nitrogen Application Timing

... the crop all season long, not just when it's applied, allowing the crop to reach full genetic potential. The unique polymer coating helps prevent against all forms of N loss, including volatilization, denitrification, and leaching. When used correctly, ESN® can substantially reduce N losses to surface water, subsurface drainage water, and groundwater, a positive impact to water quality. Producers! Interested in trying one of our demonstration practices? Contact Terry Bachtold at 815-848-4455. More... Right Source Match fertilizer type to crop needs + Select appropriate nutrient sources for cropping system ... more.

Great Lakes Cover Crop Initiative Watershed Coordinators

... to provide one on one technical support to the producers who participate in this program. These people will meet with producers and help them make important decisions to ensure a successful transition to using a cover crop and conservation tillage system. Lake Michigan Coordinator Christina Curell Central Region Water Quality Educator, Mecosta 14485 Northland Drive Big Rapids, MI, 49307 Phone: (231) 592-0792 Cell: (231) 287-8617 Email: curellc@msu.edu Christina graduated from Michigan State University with a Bachelors of Science in Animal Science. Following graduation she worked briefly with a agricultural consulting firm as an IPM scout in potatoes. She then accept ... more.

CTIC FEATURED ON AG DAY

AgDay featured CTIC in a story as part of its ongoing "Future of Farming" series. Tyne Morgan, national reporter, visited the CTIC office in early March to interview Karen Scanlon, CTIC executive director. The story aired Wednesday, March 21. Karen and Upstream Hero Larry Bonnell, interviewed on his farm in Michigan, discussed conservation successes, cover crops and water quality in the broadcast. The AgDay report also promoted CTIC's Conservation In Action Tour 2012 in the Mississippi Delta this year. To view the broadcast, click here, or for a written summary click here. CTIC thanks AgDay and Tyne Morgan for great promotion of conservation and the Conservation In Action Tour.

4Rs

Our demonstrations illustrate the 4 Rs of nutrient management: Right Source Right Rate Right Place Right Time We demonstrate management systems-- not individual practices. We measure practice success through agronomic yield, economic sustainability, nutrient use efficiency and water quality impacts.

Conservation In Action Tour 2010

What is agriculture doing to protect water quality and improve soil health? Find out on CTIC's Conservation in Action Tour 2010. Participants will visit farms and farmers in east central Virginia who have built successful, profitable farming operations through conservation and are providing their community with valuable ecosystem services. Recognizing, supporting and paying for agriculture’s ecosystem services – through government ... more.

Planned Grazing System

... reduce sediment and nutrient runoff. Consider food, water and herd size. How it works Pasture is divided into two or more pastures or paddocks with fencing. Cattle are moved from paddock to paddock on a pre-arranged schedule based on forage availability and livestock nutrition needs. How it helps Improves vegetative cover, reducing erosion and improving water quality. Increases harvest efficiency and helps ensure adequate forage throughout the grazing season. Increases forage quality and production which helps increase feed efficiency and can improve profits. Rotating also evenly distributes manure nutrient resources. Planning ahead Is there enough water of good quality available in all pastures to meet the needs of your livestock? Is the mix ... more.

Pasture Planting

... it works Drill or broadcast adapted grass or legumes into a low-producing pasture or a steep, eroding cropland field. How it helps Heavy grass cover slows water flow, reducing soil erosion. Good pastures protect water quality by filtering runoff water and increasing infiltration. Lush pastures give cover and habitat for wildlife. As plants recycle and roots die, organic matter in the soil is improved. Planning ahead Are selected species suited to your soil types? Have you chosen species that will help you reduce the use of pesticides and herbicides? Have you chosen species that will meet the needs of y ... more.

Splash

... computer game that delivers information on non-point source pollution in a fast-paced and entertaining format. Appealing for audiences of all ages, it teaches fundamental concepts about non-point source pollution prevention measures in a farm, city, and neighborhood setting. Point and click screens that move and have sound help players learn how day-to-day decisions can affect the water quality of lakes and streams.

Wisconsin, Not Just a Dairy Tour! (Aug. 30 - Sept. 1, 2010)

... future environmental issues in Wisconsin 9:00 AM - Dennis Frame, Wisconsin Discovery Farms, presents “Protecting Farming and the Environment” 12:00 PM - Tour and lunch at Pioneer Discovery Farm, Platteville, WI 2:15 PM - Visit Riechers Beef, Darlington, WI 6:00 PM - Dinner cruise on Lake Monona September 1, 2010 7:00 AM - Depart Madison 11:30 AM - Tour and lunch at water quality field station, Purdue University agronomy farm 3:30 PM - Tour duck farm near Bluffton, IN 5:00 PM - Drop off passengers in Bluffton, IN 6:00 PM - Return to Celina, OH Our bus ride will include opportunities to engage in conversation, view educational videos, and take part in interactive presentations. Questions? Contact Laura Walker at laura.walker@mercercountyohio.or ... more.

Contour Buffer Strip

... on the contour, runoff flows evenly across the entire surface of the grass strip, reducing sheet and rill erosion. How it helps Vegetation provides cover and habitat for small birds and animals. The strips reduce erosion by slowing water flow and increasing water infiltration. By reducing siltation and filtering nutrients and chemicals from runoff, grass strips improve water quality. Planning ahead Have you decided whether you want parallel crop strips or parallel buffer strips? Are other conservation measures such as crop residue management installed or planned to help reduce siltation of grass strips? Will planned acres in row crops meet your production objectives? Tech notes Buffer strips must be at least 15 feet wide. * Either crop strips ... more.

Putting Producers in the Driver's Seat

... critical to environmental success. ADMC members serve as a resource on the latest technologies in drainage water management systems. Together, they utilize a public/private approach to quantify the impact of drainage water management on many environmental and economic issues. For example, a $2 million, 20-site project involving Midwestern farmers is gathering yield, soil tilth and water quality data to assess the impact of drainage water management. The ADMC is funding this project, in part, with the help of a $972,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Conservation Innovation Grant. Preliminary results show yields may be increased by as much as 15 percent in some years. One leader in the movement for water drainage management education is ADMC member Agri Drain Corpor ... more.

Conservation In Action Tour 2011 Post-Tour News Release

... and private sector perspectives make this tour something special.” Participants appreciated the variety of information shared and time to visit with others from around the country. CTIC Executive Director Karen Scanlon comments, “This tour is a chance for people to visit farms and see real agricultural producers implementing technology and solutions for better soil and water quality. And these farmers, who make a profit while protecting resources, share their stories and offer advice to others wanting to make similar changes.” Tour stops included The Andersons, where participants learned how this company aids the region’s producers in applying the right fertilizer source at the right rate, at the right time and in the right place. At Bridgewater Da ... more.

2011 TOUR DISCOUNT DEADLINE EXTENDED

... annual Conservation In Action Tour 2011. This year’s Tour will focus on agriculture’s influence on the environmental and economic health of Maumee River and Bay, as well as Lake Erie. WHEN: August 9, 2011 WHERE: Northwest Ohio WHAT: The Tour will highlight producers implementing innovative conservation practices and solutions to water quality issues. "Early Bird" registration for the Conservation In Action Tour 2011 is now open! Click here to register. Visit the Tour Website to learn more about the Cocktail Social, Lodging Information, Sponsorship Opportunities and more.

INDIAN CREEK FIELD TOUR JULY 7, 2011

... the church at 3:00 PM central time. The church is located at 701 North 7th Street, Fairbury, IL 61739-1595. Participants will meet at the church then board a bus to visit the tour sites. Farmers and corporate sponsors at the sites will focus on effective agricultural systems while they showcase products, practices and technology that can boost profitable farming and improve water quality. Tour demonstrations will include nitrogen fertilizer split-application, slow release products, strip-till N application systems, and fertilizer use efficiency studies. These practices can improve both the farmer’s bottom line and water quality. Practices shown will emphasize the 4R cornerstones of nutrient management: use the Right source at the Right ... more.

UPSTREAM HEROES

CTIC's Upstream Heroes campaignfeatures success stories about farmers who have developed and adopted sound nutrient efficiency strategies - protecting their bottom lines as well as local and downstream water quality. Positive stories can highlight agriculture's role in contributing to water quality solutions, such as thoseassociated with high nutrient loads in the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone. National agriculture and general media sources will have access to stories about our Upstream Heroes.

For More Information

Nutrient Management Plan Resources Minnesota’s Nonpoint Source Management Program Plan 2008, Chapter 9 MPCA Phosphorus Strategy MDA Field Scale Water Quality Demonstrations (Hwy 90 & Red Top Demo site Nutrient Management Initiative Southern MN Nutrient Management Resources

Understanding Conservation Tillage Systems Resources

... to improving soil organic matter and infiltration with continuous no-till. Facilitating Conservation Farming Practices and Enhancing Environmental Sustainability with Agricultural Biotechnology explores environmental benefits of conservation tillage, facilitated significantly by biotechnology crops. A Review of BMPs for Managing Crop Nutrients and Conservation Tillage to Improve Water Quality reviews research on nutrient best management practices (BMPs) for nitrogen and phosphorus, with emphasis on integrating BMPs with conservation tillage. CTIC leads initiatives to promote and encourage adoption of conservation systems. Click here to learn more about CTIC Initiatives. CTIC recommends the following sources for more information about agricultural conservation syste ... more.

Conservation In Action Tour 2010 "Best Tour Yet"

Participants found out how agriculture protects water quality and improves soil health during the Conservation In Action Tour 2010. WHEN: August 2-3, 2010 WHERE: Williamsburg, Virginia WHAT: Visited farms and farmers in east central Virginia who run profitable operations and provide communities with valuable ecosystem services. Fill out an Evaluation Form from the Conservation In Action Tour ... more.

New Opportunities

Markets for water quality and carbon trading credits could allow growers to earn money for the environmental services they provide.

Nutrients in Our Environment - Past, Present, and Beyond Presentations

... Management - Dr. Albert Sims, University of Minnesota Agriculture and the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Issue - Dr. C.S. Snyder, International Plant Nutrition Institute On-Farm Evaluation of Nitrogen and Phosphorous Nutrient Management - Brian Williams, Minnesota Department of Ag Where the City Meets the Farm: a Case Study of Drainage and Water Quality - Dr. John F. Moncrief, University of Minnesota Nitrogen Management to Minimize Nitrate Losses to Water Resources - Jeff Vetsch, University of Minnesota "New" Technologies for Drainage Systems - Dr. Gary Sands, University of Minnesota Corn Belt N Guidelines - Dr. John Lamb, University of Minnesota What is Manure Really Worth? Maximizing the E ... more.

Crop Rotation - Core 4

... Crop rotation is a common practice on sloping soils because of its potential for soil saving. Rotation also reduces fertilizer needs, because alfalfa and other legumes replace some of the nitrogen corn and other grain crops remove. How it helps Pesticide costs may be reduced by naturally breaking the cycles of weeds, insects and diseases. Grass and legumes in a rotation protect water quality by preventing excess nutrients or chemicals from entering water supplies. Meadow or small grains cut soil erosion dramatically. Crop rotations add diversity to an operation. Planning ahead Do you have use for other crops? Cover crops may help in crop rotation. Tech notes Crops must be suited to your soils. Design crop rotations to meet the residue needs of your ... more.

Conservation Tillage Photos and Graphics

... snow over the winter to provide more moisture for the newly emerging (green) soybean plants. The stalks and other crop residue will slowly decompose to help nourish the new plants. Size: 1000 x 668 pixels (297k) Source: CTIC New corn plants growing among crop residues left from a previous harvest. Crop residues reduce runoff from farm fields to improve water quality. Size: 1000 x 672 pixels (447k) Source: CTIC Standing stalks of corn (in the foreground) will slowly decompose to provide a natural mulch for the new seeds that are to be planted by the oncoming tractor. Size: 671 x 1000 pixels (176k) Source: Farm Journal Rows of soybean plants emerge from a field covered with old corn stalks fr ... more.

Soil Quality: More than a Soil Test

... maximize soil productivity, Hubbs said. Conservation practices, including conservation tillage, buffers, weed and pest management (IPM) and crop nutrient management, can help increase organic matter and infiltration rates, support earthworm populations and maintain ideal soil chemical conditions. “Improving the soil quality is a critical step to improving and enhancing soil and water quality, generating greater profits and securing a brighter future on the farm,” said Hubbs. More information on soil quality is available on theNRCS Soil Quality Institute web page. Photo credits: CathySeybold, Soil Quality Institute

Top 10 Conservation Tillage Benefits

... continuous no-till can result in as much as two additional inches of water available to plants in late summer. 7. Reduces soil erosion Crop residues on the soil surface reduce erosion by water and wind. Depending on the amount of residues present, soil erosion can be reduced by up to 90% compared to an unprotected, intensively tilled field. 8. Improves water quality Crop residue helps hold soil along with associated nutrients (particularly phosphorous) and pesticides on the field to reduce runoff into surface water. In fact, residue can cut herbicide runoff rates in half. Additionally, microbes that live in carbon-rich soils quickly degrade pesticides and utilize nutrients to protect groundwater quality. 9. Increases wildlife ... more.

Upstream Heroes: CTIC Spreads Nutrient Management Success Stories from along the Mississippi River

Farmers throughout the Mississippi River basin are making the right choices for nutrient efficiency and water quality protection, and CTIC is telling their story. Photo courtesy of USEPA Upstream Heroes: CTIC Spreads Nutrient Management Success Stories from along the Mississippi River ByAmy Raley With current recession-generated challenges on the minds and balance sheets of every business and industry, farmers are as vigil ... more.

CIA Tour Promo 2010

... advancements in conservation and identify future needs Click here for more information. Conservation Technology Information Center’s Conservation In Action Tour, slated for Aug. 2-3, 2010, will visit innovative farm operations in east central Virginia. Presenters will initiate discussions about agriculture’s role in addressing Chesapeake Bay water quality concerns and will demonstrate equipment, tools and technologies that help farmers use nutrients efficiently. During this event, participating farmers, policy makers, agricultural advisors, conservation professionals, private industry, and others will visit farms and farmers in the Williamsburg area. Tour stops will feature successful, profitable farming operations built with ... more.

Feature Story June 2010

... litter being loaded into spreader truck in Northern Louisiana. Photo courtesy of USDA. Nurturing Crops, Protecting the Environment Emphasis on Sound Nutrient Management By Christa Martin Jones The emphasis on more and better nutrient management promises advances in farm profitability, conservation technology, and water quality improvements. Agriculture'sability to marry economy and environment, planning and implementation, and research and technology transfer will define our success. The United States Department of Agriculture recently accepted proposals for the Mississippi River Basin Initiative grants program, an effort to focus $320 million, over the next four years, for nutrient best managemen ... more.

Tree Planting

... or by hand in understocked woodlands or open fields. Tree species are matched with soil types and selected to prevent soil erosion, increase income, or boost productivity of existing woodland. How it helps Improving stands of woodlands can increase profits. Ground cover created by trees and associated debris protects soil from rill and sheet erosion. Ground cover also protects water quality by filtering excess nutrients and chemicals from surface runoff and increasing infiltration rates. Healthy, well-managed woodlands provide long-term wildlife habitat. Planning ahead Is the soil suitable for producing wood crops? Is the soil suitable for the tree species you have selected? Is there a market for the species you want to plant? Do you need this land for crops or lives ... more.

Contour Farming

... it works Crop row ridges built by tilling and/or planting on the contour create hundreds of small dams. These ridges or dams slow water flow and increase infiltration which reduces erosion. How it helps Contouring can reduce soil erosion by as much as 50% from up and down hill farming. * By reducing sediment and runoff, and increasing water infiltration, contouring promotes better water quality. Planning ahead Will more than one key contour line be needed because of steep or irregular slopes? Are terraces or stripcropping needed for steeper slopes? Are field borders needed to replace end rows in the contouring system to control sheet and rill erosion? Tech notes Establish a key line around the hill by using a hand level or contour gauge. Contour key l ... more.

Livestock Waste Management June 2010

To better manage nutrients, Lancaster County, Penn. dairy producers install manure storage tanks as part of their conservation plans. Photo courtesy of USDA-NRCS Manure Du Jour Serving Pennsylvania's Best Practices on Animal Ag. Air, and Water Quality By Kristen Saacke-Blunk Pennsylvania dairy cow. Photo courtesy of USDA-NRCS. In January 2009, Penn State Cooperative Extension and its Agriculture and Environment Center debuted the Manure du jour webcast series in response to findings of the 2008 Agriculture in Balance conference. At the conference, Pennsylvania’s agriculture and environmen ... more.

Fast vs. Fuel - The New No-Till Debate

... Werblow New No-Till Resource Online The University of Nebraska's Soil and Water Management Web site ( http://nebraskawater.unl.edu/ crops/ soil?doAsUserId=LJl9J64Gueg%25253D ) features a primer on no-till as well as a wealth of more in-depth exploration of key benefits such as soil structure, the soil ecosystem, residue management, water conservation and water quality. Clicking from the introductory pages by University of Nebraska Extension agricultural engineer Paul Jasa to volumes of how-to documents and profiles of successful no-tillers allows readers to explore no-till and conservation layer by layer. Do You Really Need to Go to Continuous Corn? One of the challenges facing no-till promoters is the often-heard line, “I ... more.

CTIC News

... responsibility for stewardship, carbon markets and profitable conservation; lunch at the Shirley Plantation, the oldest family-owned business in North America; the Carter farm where no-till cotton grows successfully in cool soil temperatures; and a series of presentations at the Paul Davis farm. These will include how agriculture will play a significant role in removing water quality impairments in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and what Clean Water Act and Total Maximum Daily Load regulations could mean to agriculture and the region. The day will end with a steak dinner on the banks of the Pamunkey River, a major tributary to the Chesapeake Bay. Plan to join us on Aug. 2 for a social event the evening before the one-day tour. Lodging and travel details will be av ... more.

Smarter Fertilizer Use Yields Environmental Benefits

... New products, such as inhibitors and controlled-release nitrogen, supply tools to follow the 4R stewardship initiative discussed in the December 2009 issue of Partners. (Click here for article.) A popular topic today is excess nutrients in the environment. From the Gulf of Mexico to the Chesapeake Bay, the Great Lakes to the Pacific Northwest, policymakers look to agriculture to improve water quality and help reduce nutrients in ground and surface water. Many conventional nitrogen application methods apply fertilizer in advance of crop needs. The delay between nitrogen application and crop uptake increases the chance for environmental losses through leaching, volatilization, and denitrification. * Leaching: the movement of plant nutrients in the soil solution below the root zone. Th ... more.

Ecocommerce: The Next Generation Ecoservice Market

... to encourage producers to conserve soil. Several decades later, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency implemented a regulatory approach to resource conservation. Both efforts succeeded to a point. However, their shortcomings have initiated ecoservice markets. After a decade of progress, ecoservice markets seemed to backslide in 2009. Relatively few of the nearly 80 water quality credit markets in the United States have generated viable trades and function as true market systems. Sequestered carbon credits are worth about a dime per ton on the Chicago Climate Exchange, and the cap-and-trade system to address climate change is losing support. U.S. House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin Peterson, who played a major role securing rural lawmakers’ support fo ... more.

4R Nutrient Stewardship: Why Now?

... of these macronutrients in many states. The absence of any single nutrient in the soil can limit plant growth, even when all other nutrients are present in adequate amounts. In addition, potash plays a critical role in drought and disease resistance. Adding to farmers’ challenges is the growing awareness of environmental issues, such as climate change and water quality. Research is underway to determine how a comprehensive set of fertilizer best management practices (BMP) and conservation best management practices may help reduce nutrient pollution and soil erosion. To help address these issues, the 4R nutrient stewardship system was developed. This peer-reviewed set of BMPs promotes the use of the right fertilizer source at the right rate, the r ... more.

Leading the way

... our customers, and our investors. We’ve set ambitious goals for ourselves. And, we hope that our sustainability efforts will help make us stronger as we help the world grow the food it needs.” To view the Mosaic Sustainability Report, click here. Mosaic and CTIC Mosaic is a strong supporter of the CTIC Upstream Heroes project, which focuses on water quality in agricultural operations. Photo courtesy of Mosaic In 2009, Mosaic became CTIC's first Gold Corporate Member – a support level of $8,500 above basic membership – which entitles Mosaic to the most benefits available from the organization. Ron says the move was an easy one. “We looked at the level of support we were already devoting to CTIC ... more.

Research & Technology Briefs

... highlights recent changes in the biofuels production process, biomass development and policies. The study focuses on four main cellulosic feedstocks, including: corn stover, miscanthus, switchgrass and wood. The full report is available at http://www.mnproject.org/pdf/TMP_Transportation-Biofuels-Update_Aug09.pdf USDA Announces $320 Million to Improve Mississippi River Basin Water Quality and Wildlife Habitat In September, USDA announced the Mississippi River Basin Healthy Watersheds Initiative (MRBI), which will provide $80 million in each of the next four fiscal years (for a total of $320 million) for voluntary projects in priority watersheds located in 12 key states. Managed by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, the MRBI will help producers adopt conservation sys ... more.

More Acres Can Also Mean More Conservation

... sheet and rill erosion and prevent gullies from forming. Photo courtesy of Jason Johnson No-till means planting into last year’s crop residue without tilling the soil. The primary benefits of no-till farming are reduced soil erosion and sediment runoff. Schroeder says other benefits he sees from no-till include cutting back on time in the field, less equipment needed, improved water quality and better soil quality. Farming in four counties on several different slopes and soil types requires adaptability. Five years ago the Schroeders began grid sampling their soils, which proved to be more accurate than the 20-acre samples they previously used. “We quickly learned where we need to fertilize, and where we don’t,” said Butch Schroeder. “There are some soil ... more.

Field Days Featured Tools for Farm Profitability

... 2 University of Missouri Delta Center Field Day. USDA NRCS Resource Conservation & Development Coordinator Scott Crumpecker spoke to field day participants, including area high school students. He highlighted nitrogen management, issues related to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, and how agricultural producers can fine tune their nitrogen application practices to save money and benefit water quality. Mike Milam, University of Missouri Extension Service, spoke with high school students about how watersheds work and how we all have an impact on water quality downstream. For more information on efficient use of nitrogen, or future educational opportunities, contact David Dunn, University of Missouri Delta Center, at 573-379-5431 or dunnd@missouri.edu. Profitability Through Nitrogen ... more.

EPA’s New CAFO Rule Changes “Duty to Apply” for NPDES Permit

... in the 2003 rule was still the most effective, cost-reasonable technology available. Like BCT, best available technology economically achievable (BAT) takes into account the cost as well as the availability, and effectiveness of the treatments. BCT and BAT for fecal coliform remain the same under the new rule as they were under the 2003 rule. However, in some areas, water quality-based effluent limitations (WQBELs) may be required in permits. WQBELs may be established without consideration of cost or what technologies are available. The new rule also states that state water quality limitations, if more stringent than federal standards, must take precedence. “I do not expect this to be a large problem,” says Wiedeman. “It may be locally for so ... more.

Agricultural Drainage Management: Benefits Could Range from the Bin to the Gulf

... " At a certain time of year, they let that water go but they would like to have it back." Grower Appeal Many progressive growers across the Midwest and the South — where drainage management was first practiced — are exploring drainage water management to see if they can achieve higher yields by saving subsurface moisture while also benefiting water quality locally and downstream. "If we could improve water quality on discharge, it's important to us," says grower Nathan Rettig of Napoleon, Ohio. "We all have to manage our environment. From a pure business standpoint, we're at least optimistic about yield potential." If a thirsty crop responded to captured subsurface moisture during a dry season and ... more.

A Look Back and a Glimpse into 2009

... profitable and sustainable. I hope you all will join us in 2009 for the Tour in western Illinois (see more details). CTIC broke new ground this year, too, with new workshops and conferences on important topics for agriculture. In August, CTIC hosted a pilot workshop in Ohio that brought together agricultural producers and advisors and wastewater and energy utilities to learn about water quality credit trading. The positive feedback we received on the format and content of the workshop was inspiring and will help us to deliver three more workshops in 2009. In September, CTIC was awarded a Conservation Innovation Grant from the Natural Resources Conservation Service(NRCS) for a project that promotes the use of cover crops to transition producers to a continuous no-till farming sys ... more.

Woodland Management

... and harvested to maintain desired production. Twigs, limbs and other debris are not removed, maintaining ground cover, reducing soil erosion and providing wildlife habitat. As trees mature they are harvested, and replacements are established. How it helps Adds income to your farm. Adds beauty to your farm. Ground cover provides wildlife habitat, reduces soil erosion and improves water quality. Planning ahead Do you need this land for livestock or crops? Are the trees you harvest going to be a marketable product? Can the soil support the type of trees and product you want? Tech notes Plant trees that are suitable to your soils. Protect from grazing. Cut undesirable trees and shrubs that are competing with desired species for sunlight and moisture. ... more.

Water and Sediment Control Basin

... is impractical; usually part of a terrace system. How it works An embankment is built across a depressional area of concentrated water runoff to act similar to a terrace. It traps sediment and water running off farmland above the structure, preventing it from reaching farmland below. How it helps Basins improve water quality by trapping sediment on uplands and preventing it from reaching water bodies. Structures reduce gully erosion by controlling water flow within a drainage area. Grass cover may provide habitat for wildlife. Planning ahead Will basins be part of an existing terrace system? Is the site too steep for the basin to work properly or be economically feasible? Can adequate outlets be provide ... more.

Terrace

... intercept water and guide it to an outlet. There are two basic types of terraces—storage terraces and gradient terraces. Storage terraces collect water and store it until it can infiltrate into the ground or be released through a stable outlet. Gradient terraces are designed as a channel to slow runoff water and carry it to a stable outlet like a grassed waterway. How it helps Both water quality and soil quality are improved. Terraces with grass on front or backslopes can provide nesting habitat. Planning ahead Will other conservation practices be used in conjunction with terraces to prevent sedimentation? Tech notes Chisel the parts of the terrace that will be farmed to loosen compacted soil. Fertilize and seed according to NRCS recommendations. Grassed backslope t ... more.

Stream Protection

... the banks from heavy stream flow and reduce erosion. Fencing prevents cattle from trampling banks, destroying vegetation and stirring up sediment in the streambed. A buffer zone of vegetation along the streambank filters runoff and may also absorb excess nutrients and chemicals. How it helps Streambanks are covered with rocks, grass, trees or other cover to reduce erosion. Better water quality results from reducing amounts of nutrients, chemicals, animal waste and sediment entering the stream. Buffer zones provide cover and habitat for birds and small animals. Planning ahead Have you planned to install an offstream water system for livestock or limited livestock access to the stream? Are proper soil conservation measures installed in the stream watershed to prevent siltatio ... more.

Pest Management

... against the cost of control. Finally, if pest control is economical, all alternatives are evaluated based on cost, results, and environmental impact. Precaution is taken to keep any chemicals from leaving the field by leaching, runoff or drift. How it helps Scouting and spot treatment for only those pests that are threatening can save money. Using fewer chemicals improves water quality. Specific treatments for specific pests on specific areas of a field prevents over-treatment of pests. Planning ahead Which soils on your farm are likely to leach pesticides? Did you establish filter strips along streams? Did you consider pest control alternatives? Did you use records of crops and pest control for reference? Did you rotate crops to reduce the chance of pest prob ... more.

Nutrient Management

Applying the correct amount, form, and timing of plant nutrients for optimum yield and minimum impact on water quality. How it works After taking a soil test, setting realistic yield goals, and taking credit for contributions from previous years' crops and manure applications, crop nutrient needs are determined. Nutrients are then applied at the proper time by the proper application method. Nutrient sources include animal manure, biosolids, and commercial fertilizers. These steps reduce the potential ... more.

Manure Testing

... manure and sending it to an approved lab for analysis to determine nutrient content is the first step in a manure management system. This data is used to match application rates to plant nutrient needs and soil test data. How it helps Manure testing and proper application to the land can reduce crop input costs. Preventing over-application of manure to crop fields results in improved water quality. Planning ahead What form of manure do you plan to apply? Have you calibrated your spreader to apply the volume of manure called for according to plant needs and nutrient value of manure? Have you reduced commercial fertilizer use after accounting for nutrients supplied by manure? Will you hire someone or take manure samples yourself? Do you plan to take soil samples to help deter ... more.

Manure Storage

... storage pond, above or below ground tank, pit underneath a confinement facility or a sheltered concrete slab area. Manure can be pumped, scraped and hauled, pushed or flushed into your storage structure. The structure's purpose is to safely contain the manure and keep nutrient loss and pollution of downstream water bodies to a minimum by preventing runoff. How it helps Protects water quality, by preventing runoff from feedlots. Cuts fertilizer costs and reduces nutrient losses. Allows for field application when conditions are right. Planning ahead Is the structure planned for the proper location considering the landscape, potential odor problems, visibility, aesthetic value and compatibility with existing farm buildings? Will the structure store manure in a form you hav ... more.

Grade Control Structure

... and reduces water flow. The structure drops water from one stabilized grade to another and prevents overfall gullies from advancing up a slope. How it helps Grade control structures are often used at the outlet of a grassed waterway to stabilize the waterway outlet, preventing gully erosion. Grassed, non-eroding waterways made possible with a grade control structure give better water quality, can be crossed with equipment, and look better than non-stabilized gullies. If it is planned to store water, a grade control structure may provide a water source and habitat for wildlife. Planning ahead Are adequate conservation practices installed above the structure to prevent sedimentation? Is the planned location in the proper place to achieve the level of control you want? ... more.

Filter Strip

... Collected nutrients are used by the vegetation, rather than entering water supplies. Filtered water then enters water bodies. How it helps Grass, trees and shrubs provide cover for small birds and animals. Ground cover reduces soil erosion. The vegetative strip moves rowcrop operations farther from a stream. Vegetation prevents contaminants from entering water bodies, protecting water quality. Planning ahead Are adequate soil conservation measures installed above filter strips? Are plants adapted to your soil types? Have you selected the correct species of vegetation for the control you need? For example, are you establishing the filter strip around a sinkhole, to control runoff from a feedlot or to filter runoff from cropland? Tech notes Filter strips are most eff ... more.

Field Border

... referred to as picture frames of grass, and are used with contour farming, terrace, buffer strip and contour stripcropping systems. The grass or legume in the strip protects steep field edges from soil erosion, and provides turning and travel lanes around the field. How it helps Vegetative cover reduces sheet and rill erosion by slowing water flow. Vegetation filters runoff to improve water quality. Grass and legume strips may be harvested in some cases and are easier to turn on than end rows. Vegetation provides cover and habitat for small birds and animals. Planning ahead Will the width be wide enough to turn your equipment? Can that land qualify for set aside? Tech notes Borders must be at least 16 feet wide, or wide enough for your equipment. * Borders need to be ... more.

Farm Pond

... a dam across an existing gully or low lying area. Earth for the dam is dug out above the dam with heavy machinery to form a bowl. Generally the ponded area fills with water within a year. An overflow pipe is installed through the dam to control the water level and allow water to spill through the dam without causing erosion. How it helps Prevents soil erosion and protects water quality by collecting and storing runoff water. Provides water for livestock, fish and wildlife, and recreational opportunities. Adds value and beauty to a farm or farmstead. Provides a water supply for emergencies. Planning ahead Are adequate soil conservation measures installed near the proposed pond site to protect it from filling with sediment? Is there a dependable source of clean wa ... more.

Diversion

... is often built at the base of a slope to divert runoff away from bottom lands. A diversion may also be used to divert runoff flows away from a feedlot, or to collect and direct water to a pond. How it helps Reduces soil erosion on lowlands by catching runoff water and preventing it from reaching farmland below. Vegetation in the diversion channel filters runoff water, improving water quality. Vegetation provides cover for small birds and animals. Allows better crop growth on bottom land soils. Planning ahead Are there proper soil conservation measures installed to prevent the diversion from filling with sediment? Is the outlet planned in a location which will not cause erosion? Is the diversion and outlet large enough to handle the runoff amount for that location? ... more.

Crop Residue Management

... on the surface before and during planting operations provides cover for the soil at a critical time of the year. The residue is left on the surface by reducing tillage operations and turning the soil less. Pieces of crop residue shield soil particles from rain and wind until plants can produce a protective canopy. How it helps Ground cover prevents soil erosion and protects water quality. Residue improves soil tilth and adds organic matter to the soil as it decomposes. Fewer trips and less tillage reduces soil compaction. Time, energy and labor savings are possible with fewer tillage trips. Planning ahead Will your crop produce enough residue? Is crop residue management part of a planned system of conservation measures? Do you have the needed equipment? Tech ... more.

Managing Manure and Litter on Animal Feeding Operations with Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans

CNMPs are very important resources. They provide valuable natural resource management information and help farmers and ranchers comply with water quality regulations. The final EPA regulation for CAFOs and recent public pressure elevate the importance of this NRCS planning assistance. You are encouraged to emphasize this importance and continue to communicate and collaborate with livestock and poultry industry producers and representatives. Contact. Additional copies may be ordered for NRCS offices, partners, and the public, without cost, by e-m ... more.

Manure Management and Air Quality - University of Minnesota Extension

Various planner resources and research, educational programs and materials focus on economically feasible and environmentally-sound manure handling systems that also meet Federal, state, and local air and water quality protection regulations.

Critical Area Planting

Planting grass or other vegetation to protect a badly eroding area from soil erosion. How it works Grass, legumes, trees or shrubs are established in small, isolated areas of excessive erosion. The vegetation provides surface cover to stop the raindrop splash and slow water flow. How it helps It reduces soil erosion. A vegetated area improves water quality by reducing the amount of sediment, nutrients and chemicals running off farmland. Protects areas such as dams, terrace backslopes or gullied areas when vegetation may be difficult to establish. Vegetation can be planted to provide small areas of nesting cover for birds and small animals. Planning ahead Will protection provided by the critical area planting be adequate? Ar ... more.

Questions and Answers

... be tailored to meet a farmer’s specific needs. Better soil Sustainable soils that increase long-term productivity result from increased organic matter, improved soil moisture, reduced compaction, sequestered carbon and reduced erosion from water and wind. Cleaner water In addition to food, fiber, energy and other renewable resources, agriculture can also protect and improve water quality. Greater on-farm profits Sharpening management skills and utilizing the latest appropriate technologies result in higher levels of economic efficiency and cropland productivity A brighter future for all of us. Consumer expectations include more than abundant food, fiber and energy. They also expect agriculture to protect air, soil, water and wildlife. What do farmers need to d ... more.

What are Conservation Buffers?

... from farm fields. Buffers include: contour buffer strips, field borders, filter strips, grassed waterways, living snow fences, riparian buffers, shelterbelts/windbreaks, (grass, shrubs and trees), and wetlands. The small amount of land taken out of production helps producers meet environmental and economic goals. Key Messages Conservation buffers protect soil, improve air and water quality, enhance fish and wildlife habitat, and beautify the landscape. Conservation buffers shows a producer’s commitment to conservation and their willingness to protect the environment. Benefits of Conservation Buffers * Slow water runoff. * Remove up to 50% or more of nutrients and pesticides in runoff. * Remove up do 60% or more of pathogens in runoff. * Remove up to 75% o ... more.

Countour Strip Cropping

... traps sediment and provides surface cover. Ridges formed by contoured rows slow water flow which reduces erosion. Rotating the strips from corn to legumes allows nutrient-needy crops to benefit from the nitrogen added to the soil by legumes. This practice combines the beneficial effects of contouring and crop rotation. How it helps Contour stripcropping reduces soil erosion and protects water quality. Contour stripcropping may help reduce fertilizer costs. Planning ahead How many acres of row crops do you need? Does your crop rotation allow for alternating row crops with small grains and forages? Will herbicide carryover be a problem? Tech notes Row crop strips need to be nearly the same width as small grains or meadow. A 10% variance is allowed. Plant grass or legu ... more.

Alberta Reduced Tillage LINKAGES

... the adoption of sustainable production systems based on reduced tillage. Increase awareness of the positive effects of reduced tillage systems on climate change adaptation, greenhouse gas emissions or carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide, and carbon sequestration. Reduce cropping risk. Increase the awareness of the positive effects of reduced tillage on surface water quality. www.reducedtillage.ca

Southern Plains Agricultural Resources Coalition (SPARC)

... to be taken to make the change happen, along with: the time frame for the change to occur; what, if any funding is needed; how success will be measured; and who is responsible for ensuring the change takes place. Water Resources Concerns There are numerous and diverse issues related to water resources in the Southern Plains region. Many water bodies have regulatory issues, i.e., water quality does not comply with some aspect of state standards. In this region, sediments and elevated nutrient (N, P) content are key water quality issues. Sedimentation effects storage capacity in reservoirs and can cause excessive turbidity. Elevated nutrients can result in oxygen depletion and in extreme cases fish kills. Degraded stream channels in the region contribute to problems in reservoirs. Reser ... more.

Upstream Heroes: Nutrient Management Succss Stories from American's Farms

... use the right fertilizer product, apply it at the right rate, at the right time and in the right place. CTIC, a trusted source of information for agriculture for more than 27 years, is uniquely qualified to launch an information campaign about nutrient management targeted to agricultural producers. A secondary audience is the general public, including members of environmental groups involved in water quality issues. CTIC's networks reach into the non-farm conservation community, allowing us to show members of the public the steps farmers are taking to protect water quality upstream The campaign will explain the hypoxia issue and need for nutrient management in terms and messages that appeal to agricultural audiences and deliver those messages at the right time and place to capture the attention a ... more.

Planning Now Can Avoid Permit Later

... Later by Steve Werblow Assessing an animal feeding operation’s manure storage and handling systems, and being sure to prevent discharges into waters of the state or U.S., can keep a producer from having to apply for an NPDES permit. The livestock industry’s intense interest in upcoming revisions to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) livestock water quality rule has renewed talk about the need for large Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) to apply for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits. Set to limit the discharges of pathogens, ammonia and other water quality parameters like biological oxygen demand, NPDES permits put the livestock operations, at some levels, in the same category as industrial facilities like wast ... more.

Research and Technology Briefs Dec 2008 II

... professor of agronomy at Purdue University and MCCC Executive Committee member, says this Web site will not only help farmers to find useful information on cover crops and how to use them, but also raise awareness of the potential importance of cover crops for anybody tied to agriculture. “We hope others will realize cover crops are important to the overall system of farming and to water quality,” she says. Kladivko is one of the six executive committee members who envisioned the idea of coming together to pool resources and connect with others interested in cover crops and then share that with the public through a Web site. “There is a lot of knowledge in the Midwest, but it was never well-linked,” she says. Now farmers and others interested in ... more.

National Soil Tilth Laboratory

National Soil Tilth Laboratory USDA Agricultural Research Service Established 1989 Research laboratory within the USDA-ARS organization charged with conducting research on farming systems and their impact on air, soil, and water quality. Multidisciplinary research teams address problems using multiple scales of studies that range from basic laboratory analyses of soils to watershed and regional assessment of farming systems impacts on environmental quality and production efficiency. Mission, Goals and Contact Information www.ars.usda.gov/mwa/ames/nstl

Working with Farmers for Cleaner Water

5-minute video about how The Nature Conservancy and partners work with farmers to improve water quality in the Pecatonica River.

Wastewater Treatment Plants Dewater Dairy Manure

John Vrieze's on-farm wastewater treatment system starts with manure (left), removes the suspended solids to create low-P "tea water" (center), then filters out dissolved solids to yield clear water (right). Graphic courtesy of Integrated Separation Systems Wastewater Treatment Plants Dewater Dairy Manure by Steve Werblow ... more.

DRAINAGE WATER MANAGEMENT IN CONSERVATION AGRICULTURE SYSTEMS

ADMC received a Conservation Innovation Grant in 2006 to promote and characterize the unique technology of drainage water management (DWM) – the practice of managing water table depths to reduce nutrient transport from tiles during the fallow season or to reduce water deficit stress during the growing season. Considering that no such guidance currently exists, this innovative multi-state project is developing a set of regional recommendations that are necessary to facilitate and encourage the widespread adopti ... more.

Wetland Enhancement

Installing practices such as dikes in existing wetlands to manage water levels and improve habitat. How it works Most wetland enhancement work includes small structures built to add water or regulate water levels in an existing wetland. Subsurface and surface drains and tiles are plugged. Concrete and earthen structures—usually d ... more.

Integrated Manure Management: Good Neighbors, Good Business

Mike Beard and his family have built a national reputation as top managers of feed, water and manure on their 15,000-head hog operation in Indiana. Photo courtesy of Steve Werblow Integrated Manure Management: Good Neighbors, Good Business by Steve Werblow There aren’t many 15,000-head hog operations that open their doors to neighbors for an annual open house. But Me ... more.

Success Story June 2010

... Research Service National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment (NLAE) shows cover crops planted in the fall between harvest and planting of spring crops help reduce soil erosion, limit nitrogen leaching, suppress weeds, increase soil organic matter and improve overall soil quality. Small grain cover crops increase surface cover, anchor corn and soybean residues, and increase water infiltration. Several cover crops, like turnips and radishes, are also suitable for grazing by livestock and wildlife. Aerial seeding of cover crops in August or after harvest is also an option. Cover Crop Success with Organic Farming Workshop panel member Earl Hafner of Panora says a mix of cover crops serve a vital purpose for his organic row crop and livestock operation. He plants ... more.

Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Webinars

... webinars Barry Toning Jim Kreissl Vic D'Amato Khalid Alvi Juli Beth Hinds will focus on information in regards to wastewater treatment for upcoming and existing development. Presentations will be given by the members of Tetra Tech staff. To view the agenda and topics to be discussed, click here. Sponsored by Conservation Technology Information Center, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Tetra Tech November 9th: Overview of Centralized and Decentralized Treatment Issues S ... more.

Lessening the Pain

... and farmers could lose nitrogen.” In addition to protecting against erosion and helping to build soil quality, residue left on the field in no-till cropping systems can help producers get into the field earlier in cold, wet harvest seasons. Photo courtesy of NRCS Not only could farmers lose the nitrogen applied to their fields, that nitrogen can enter nearby waterways, creating water-quality issues and adding to already established hypoxic zones, he adds. Another potential problem with applying anhydrous in a wet fall: heavy, silty clay soils will not crumble and reseal the slot though which nitrogen is applied, Reicosky says. “Unless a farmer takes the precautions to cover that gap, he runs the risk of losing some of that nitrogen,&rdq ... more.

Wetland

Marsh-type area with saturated soils and water-loving plants. Wetlands provide wildlife habitat and serve as natural filters for agricultural runoff. How it works Na ... more.

Well Protection

Changing farming practices which occur on or near the farmstead in order to reduce the risk of contamination of water sources — mainly the well.& ... more.

California Conservation Tillage Workgroup

... goals, we have also been pursuing means and opportunities for increasing the adoption of CT in California. This workgroup directly addresses the following DANR program priorities: 1) Issue 1. Productivity and Efficiency of Agriculture. Actions 1, 2 and 3 by evaluating and developing comprehensive management systems for crop health and soil quality, and for potentially increasing the water use efficiency of a variety of cropping systems throughout the state by the use of reduced tillage practices. 2) Issue 3. Environmental Quality and Resource Conservation. Actions 1, 5 and 6 by evaluating and developing production systems that may improve input use efficiencies, conserve soil quality and reduce health and environmental risks from agriculture. The Conservation Tillage Wor ... more.

Apply gypsum to your fields to balance soil structure, Improve nutrient uptake, and yield heartier, healthier crops

... improves structure and balances the nutrients in your soil. Plus, it offers a variety of other valuable benefits: Flushes out unwanted Magnesium, Aluminum, and Sodium Aids biological processes in building soil structure Loosens soil and reduces compaction Improves residue breakdown, which adds more nutrients to your soil Enhances soil's water infiltration and water-holding capacity Allows for faster drainage, which can mean more days in the field Helps soil release nutrients to the crop Improves rooting of plants for better drought tolerance Reduce expensive fertilizer applications You already have literally hundreds of years of nutrients trapped in your soil. The main issue is balancing these nut ... more.

Cover crop and soil quality interactions in agroecosystems.

Maintaining environmental quality implies sustainable agricultural production systems that preserve and prated soil resources. <span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%;Calibri" ,"sans-serif";times="" new="" roman";times="" roman";"="">Cover crop and soil quality interactions in agroecosystems.

Conservation Buffers Fact Sheet

Conservation Buffer Facts Conservation Buffers are small areas or strips of land in vegetation, designed to slow water runoff, provide shelter and stabilize riparian areas. Strategically placed in the agricultural landscape, buffers can effectively mitigate the movement of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides within farm fields. Buffers include: contour buffer strips, field orders, filter strips, windbreaks, and wetlands. A small amount of land in buffers can assist producers in meeting both econo ... more.

Crop Nutrient Management Facts

... tilth and, ultimately increases soil productivity. Why is soil quality important? Better soil retains more moisture for dry periods, yet the improved structure speeds natural infiltration in wet spots. In the Great Plains, continuous no-till conserves 2-4" of soil moisture annually when compared to intensive tillage systems. In other areas, it improves water infiltration after the soil reaches its maximum water holding capacity. The improved soil structure also reduces compaction enabling plant roots to be stronger, healthier. Cleaner water Soil erosion can be reduced by 90% (compared to intensive tillage). While we have long thought of soil erosion as reducing top soil, we now know it's one of the top &lsqu ... more.

Conservation Tillage

... tilth and, ultimately increases soil productivity. Why is soil quality important? Better soil retains more moisture for dry periods, yet the improved structure speeds natural infiltration in wet spots. In the Great Plains, continuous no-till conserves 2-4" of soil moisture annually when compared to intensive tillage systems. In other areas, it improves water infiltration after the soil reaches its maximum water holding capacity. The improved soil structure also reduces compaction enabling plant roots to be stronger, healthier. Cleaner water Soil erosion can be reduced by 90% (compared to intensive tillage). While we have long thought of soil erosion as reducing top soil, we now know it's one of the top ‘pollutants ... more.

Partners Contribution June 2010

... nonprofit organization that represents America’s 3,000 conservation districts and the 17,000 men and women who serve on their governing boards. Conservation districts are local units of government established under state law to carry out natural resource management programs at the local level. Districts work with millions of landowners and operators to help them manage and protect land and water resources on all private lands and many public lands in the United States. Conservation districts have been involved in delivering locally-driven conservation across America for more than 70 years. No other conservation or environmental group in the country implements more conservation practices on the ground. The beauty of conservation districts is that they exist in virtually every county ... more.

Anaerobic Digesters: A Community Approach

... bacteria work their way through the manure over the course of days or weeks, the gas is captured, cleansed to enhance its energy value and fed to methane-powered engines that generate electricity. Heat from the process feeds the manure-warming system and other industrial processes, including Inland Empire’s reverse-osmosis desalination plant, which produces 14 million gallons of drinking water daily for local residents. While the generators spin out 1 megawatt (MW) of electricity per day—enough to supply about half of what IEUA consumes—the environment wins in other ways, too. Odors and pathogens are controlled, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter are reduced by 99 percent and more than five tons of salts and nitrates are kept out of the Santa Ana ... more.

NPS Monitoring Workshop Presentations

Intro to Watershed Planning & 9 Elements Getting the Big Picture Purposes of Chemical, Physical, and Biological Monitoring Common Monitoring Parameters Accessing Existing and Web Based Data Using Hoosier RiverWatch Data for Assessment and Planning Observational Approaches to Monitoring and Assessment Characterizing Baseline Water Body Conditions Interpreting and Using Existing Data to Identi ... more.

Exploring Biotechnology

Agricultural biotechnology delivers more than just streamlined pest management options or the promise of healthier, higher quality crops. Biotech-derived crops allow growers to adopt sustainable farming practices ranging from conservation tillage to integrated pest management. Those practices protect soil, water and air quality and allow producers to sustain our natural resources as well as our lives and lifestyles. The Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC), with funding from the United Soybean Board, has produced Facilitating Conservation Farming Practices and Enhancing Environmental Sustainability with Agricultural Biotechnology, a thorough exploration of the environmental benefits of ... more.

Cover crop effects on soil water relationships.

Cover crops help control erosion, prevent nutrient leaching, fix nitrogen, improve sail conditions, and protect seedlings, but also use water, thus affecting soil water relationships far the next crop. <span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%;Calibri" ,"sans-serif";times="" new="" roman";times="" roman";"="">Cover crop effects on soil water relationships.

Soil and Water Conservation Society

CTIC Institutional Gold Member, Soil and Water Conservation Society, has a mission to foster the science and art of natural resource conservation. Their work targets conservation of soil, water, and related natural resources on working land - the land used to produce food, fiber, and other services that improve the quailty of life people experience in rural and urban communities. They work to discover, develop, implement, and cons ... more.

Experts Dispute Study That Relates No-Till to Algae Problem

Phosphorus runoff contributes to the shoreline of Lake Erie accumulating algae. Photo courtesy of EPA Experts Dispute Study That Relates No-Till to Algae Problem Rachel Doctor Last spring, a study conducted by Hiedelberg College's water lab in Tiffin, Ohio, reported that no-till farming was contributing to the dissolved phosphorus that enters the water supply and causes an accumulation of algae in Lake Erie. According to Norm Widman, national agronomist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), no-till systems are not the reason for this dissolved phosphorus, but several things have caused a “perfect st ... more.

CTIC Launches New Conservation Information Website

... brand-new website at www.ctic.org. The easy-to-search, simple-to-navigate site contains thousands of documents and links to information on conservation farming systems. Among the highlights are: A searchable database from the Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS), which uses satellite imagery to provide detailed data on tillage practices and cover crops at the county or watershed (HUC-8) scale; Cover crop insight, including details of the economic and environmental benefits of cover crops and the results of five annual farmer surveys on cover crop use; Tips on organizing watershed groups and multi-stakeholder conservation efforts, including tips, analysis of knowledge transfer, and ideas for creating effective demonstration plots; Real-world perspective on conse ... more.

Conservation Technology Information Center Strategic Plan

... emerging issues in conservation and sustainable agriculture and plans to extend this recognition internationally. CTIC benefits from and serves a strong network comprised of leaders in agriculture and conservation. Through this network, CTIC promotes and disseminates comprehensive data, research and materials related to conservation and sustainable agriculture that achieves better soil, cleaner water, greater profits and a brighter future. Mission Statement CTIC champions, promotes and provides information on technologies and sustainable agricultural systems that conserve and enhance soil, water, air and wildlife resources and are productive and profitable. Values Respect: CTIC treats every member and partner with respect, efficient service and a dedication to quality. Dedica ... more.

A decade of advances in cover crops

Cover crops with limited irrigation can increase yields, crop quality, and nutrient and water use efficiencies while protecting the environment. Delgado, J.A., M. A. Dillon, R. T. Sparks, and S. Y.C. Essah. 2007. A decade of advances in cover crops. J. Soil Water Conserv. 62(5):110A-117A.

Timothy J. Healey, Agrotain International, LLC

... are a company that manufactures or sells a product used in no-till agriculture, CTIC is the organization you should support. CTIC is the only organization that I am aware of that promotes the agricultural conservation practice that truly minimizes the impact of agriculture on the environment – continuous no-till. Continuous no-till agriculture is smart agriculture. It reduces air and water pollution associated with tillage, improves soil quality and results in higher profits to producers. If you are a company that consumes agricultural products, CTIC is an organization deserving your support. Most businesses involved in processing ag products to produce consumer goods have to comply with air and water regulations. A company can take their commitment to product stewardship one ... more.

Illinois Soybean Association

We live our values by making sustainability goals part of everything we do throughout the soybean lifecycle - from soil to seed to marketplace. Our environmental stewardship programs encourage reduced tillage as well as other tactics to improve energy efficiency, water conservation, water and air quality, and a variety of best management practices.

National Pork Board

CTIC Institutional Member, the National Pork Board, has a mission to provide the scientific support for identifying and addressing issues affecting the health, safety and quality of the pork industry’s animals, products or people. Broad areas of responsibility include pork quality, environment, food safety, swine health, animal welfare and producer health and safety. To learn more about the National Pork Board, visit www.pork.org

2014 Tour Wrap-Up

... from 20 states heard this unique story. The audience represented numerous roles in the agriculture industry, such as growers, agricultural retailers, members of the media, agricultural and conservation organization representatives, federal and state agency representatives, students and researchers. Tour high points: Constructed wetland known as a stormwater treatment area that helps decrease the amount of nutrients in water running off of crop fields Best Management Practices that agricultural producers can use to keep soil and inputs on their fields Wooden boxes posted around fields as homes for owls Sugarcane planting and harvesting A beautiful view of the sunset over Lake Okeecho ... more.

Don't miss the CTIC Conservation In Action Tour 2008

... practices in their profitable operations. Starkey Farms Partnership , Brownsburg, Indiana • 8 years of continuous no-till • Gradually incorporated 200 acres of annual ryegrass as cover crop • Gypsum added as a soil amendment to improve soil structure and infiltration • Tile Nitrogen outflow monitored by a local university because the farm is within a watershed that supplies drinking water to nearby Indianapolis Lamb Farms , Lebanon, Indiana • 84% of corn and soybeans are no-till or strip-till • RTK systems used to apply and manage nutrients • 98 percent of compost produced is used on their farm for fertilizer and soil amendment • Nearly 50 acres of conservation buffers along ditches Meadowlane Farms , Frankf ... more.

2018 Membership Drive

... Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) is a unique public-private partnership that brings together farmers, researchers, policy makers, regulators, agribusiness leaders, conservation group organizers and others at the same table to share information on conservation farming systems. In short, we Connect, Inform and Champion to encourage the adoption of practices that protect soil, water and air quality as well as farmers’ economic sustainability. There has never been a better time to join CTIC. We’ve got great programs in the field and a clearinghouse full of information on everything from selecting the right cover crops to organizing watershed-wide conservation projects. In addition to the information below, a membership application is now available online at ... more.

Cover Crops - An Essential Tool for Sustainable Cropping Sys

... the biological activity. Higher biological activity increases nutrient cycling and availability and also reduces nutrient loss due to run off. With all this activity, soil structure and tilth are improved, increasing infiltration rates and reducing compaction. Implementation of cover crops can have the following beneficial effects: Increase soil organic matter Increase infiltration of water into the soil Decrease runoff to nearby waterways Decrease soil erosion and transport to nearby waterways Conserve soil moisture Reduce soil compaction Increase nutrient availability to the crop Reduce nitrate leaching to groundwater Supply nitrogen to following crop Suppress weeds, potential reducing the need for herbicides Suppress soil-born diseases and nematodes, potentially ... more.

Cover Crops - An Essential Tool for Sustainable Cropping Sys

... the biological activity. Higher biological activity increases nutrient cycling and availability and also reduces nutrient loss due to run off. With all this activity, soil structure and tilth are improved, increasing infiltration rates and reducing compaction. Implementation of cover crops can have the following beneficial effects: Increase soil organic matter Increase infiltration of water into the soil Decrease runoff to nearby waterways Decrease soil erosion and transport to nearby waterways Conserve soil moisture Reduce soil compaction Increase nutrient availability to the crop Reduce nitrate leaching to groundwater Supply nitrogen to following crop Suppress weeds, potential reducing the need for herbicides Suppress soil-born diseases and nematodes, potentially reducing ... more.

Cover Crops - An Essential Tool for Sustainable Cropping Systems

... the biological activity. Higher biological activity increases nutrient cycling and availability and also reduces nutrient loss due to run off. With all this activity, soil structure and tilth are improved, increasing infiltration rates and reducing compaction. Implementation of cover crops can have the following beneficial effects: Increase soil organic matter Increase infiltration of water into the soil Decrease runoff to nearby waterways Decrease soil erosion and transport to nearby waterways Conserve soil moisture Reduce soil compaction Increase nutrient availability to the crop Reduce nitrate leaching to groundwater Supply nitrogen to following crop Suppress weeds, potential reducing the need for herbicides Suppress soil-born diseases and nematodes, potentially ... more.

The Great Crop Rotation Cover-Up

... SAG 08 09 This is a literature review of cover crop benefits from Dabney et al. 2001 and Dabney 1996. Oilseed_Radish Oilseed radish is a unique cover crop that farmers are planting to improve their soil quality for economic crop production. IndianaRMA Interest and use of cover crops as a practice to reduce high nutrient and sediment levels along existing water sources has increased across the Midwest. Cover Crops Helps Chart-After Corn-Corn Silage-DR Cover crop decision making chart for the year after corn. Cover Crops Helps Chart-After Cereal Grains-DR Cover crop decision making chart for the year after cereal grains. Cover Crop rotations SAG_9_09 Cover Crops Rotations after Cash Grain Crop ... more.

30th ANNIVERSARY SUMMARY AND PHOTOS

... CTIC’s 30th anniversary is a perfect opportunity to take stock of the conservation achievements of American agriculture over the last 30 years, trace the path that the industry has taken to get where we are, and chart a course for the future,” said CTIC board member Ron Olson of The Mosaic Company, the lead sponsor for the event. “Information about the stewardship of soil, water and air quality is absolutely critical to agriculture and to society as a whole. CTIC has a long and proud history of sharing the information that helps put conservation practices on the ground to everybody’s benefit.”

Implementation of cover crops can have the following beneficial effects:

Increase soil organic matter Increase infiltration of water into the soil Decrease runoff to nearby waterways Decrease soil erosion and transport to nearby waterways Conserve soil moisture Reduce soil compaction Increase nutrient availability to the crop Reduce nitrate leaching to groundwater Supply nitrogen to following crop Suppress weeds, potential reducing the need for herbicides Suppress soil-born ... more.

The Flatwater Group

CTIC Corporate Member, The Flatwater Group (TFG), specializes in restoration design, water resources, planning, and environmental engineering. TFG was founded and organized on the principles of flexible client services coupled with creative solutions, and we strive to produce a successful product not just for their clients, but with their clients. The quality of TFG's professional services is excellent and their stat ... more.

Web Site is a Treasure Trove of Livestock Waste Management Information

... advisors and regulators to dig deeper into the growing trove of online tools, data resources, contacts and success stories to help livestock operations meet their regulatory requirements, and even turn excess nutrients into money more effectively than ever. "As a clearinghouse for information on conservation farming practices that can help producers improve their soil, protect water and air quality, and improve profitability, CTIC saw the opportunity to create this web site as a way to further fulfill our mission," says Karen Scanlon, executive director of CTIC. "We see steady on-line traffic as people browse through the wide variety of resources linked to the site." Popular links include an array of online manure management planners, cost calculators an ... more.

International Meeting Spotlights Conservation Agriculture's Role in Mitigating Climate Change

... microbes healthy (again through minimal soil disturbance), fertilizing crops adequately, avoiding soil compaction and rotating crops. “It's really site-specific, and we really need to understand the crop system we're talking about,” said Amado. Got to Pay Building carbon levels in the soil delivers a variety of important benefits, from improved soil quality to better water-holding capacity, higher fertility and resistance to erosion. Still, the biggest enticement to sequestering carbon will be creating markets through which farmers can sell the service they provide. “I think what we're really looking for as a farm organization, or society in general, is some way to reward farmers and ranchers for doing things like storing carbon and some other envir ... more.

Turning Manure into Energy

... found their solution a little closer to home in the $3.6-million Elimanure system, designed by Wisconsin-based Skill Associates. Though their 2,600 owned acres and 2,600 rented acres represented enough land for agronomically acceptable manure application, building a power plant on the dairy reduced their manure movement from an 8-mile radius to about 1,000 feet of pipeline. Because water comprises more than half of the weight of dairy manure, the Wieses' Elimanure facility dries the manure before heating it in a combustion chamber. That's a big challenge with dairy manure, but the Elimanure design channels heat from the furnace back to the biodryer building to dry the incoming fuel, blowing off the moisture as clean steam. Wiese calls the energy expended in drying the wet ... more.

Changes in Manure Management in the Hog Sector: 1998 - 2004

By Nigel Key, William D. McBride, and Marc Ribaudo Economic Information Bulletin No. (EIB-50) 29 pp, March 2009 In recent years, structural changes in the hog sector, including increased farm size and regional shifts in production, have altered manure management practices. Also, changes to the Clean Water Act, State regulations, and increasing local conflicts over air quality issues, including odor, have influenced manure management decisions. This study uses data from two national surveys of hog farmers to examine how hog manure management practices vary with the scale of production and how these practices evolved between 1998 and 2004. Included are the effects of structural changes, recent polic ... more.

CTIC Conservation in Action Tour Draws 130+ to Chesapeake Bay

About 130 farmers, agency staffers, soil and water conservation district personnel, environmental and agribusiness leaders, and others gathered on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay for CTIC’s “Bringing Back the Bay” Conservation in Action Tour July 10 and 11. The Chesapeake Bay has become the proving ground for a wide range of best management practices (BMPs) designed to protect the fragile system from excess nutrien ... more.

Ag Consulting Trainings

... with the US EPA, CTIC will provide leadership and technical support to successfully plan, organize, coordinate, evaluate and share information from five workshops held between 2015 and 2020. These workshops will provide attendees the foundation to target, design, and implement conservation practices for their clients. Practices covered will include in-field nutrient management, drainage water management systems, bioreactors, saturated buffers and more. CTIC will host specific practice summaries and other materials that will help this project’s target audience. In addition to the US EPA’s assistance, the following partners ensure that these workshops provide value to and are well attended by their membership: Agri Drain Corp. Agricultural Drainage Management Coal ... more.

AG CONSULTANT TRAINING

... CTIC will design the workshops with the following groups in mind: - Agricultural retailers - Certified Crop Advisors (CCAs) - Land Improvement Contractors of America (LICA) - Members of Agricultural Drainage Management Coalition (ADMC) - National Alliance of Independent Crop Consultants (NAICC) - NRCS Technical Service Providers (TSPs) - Soil and Water Conservation District staff and engineers Through a collaborative agreement with the US EPA, CTIC will provide leadership and technical support to successfully plan, organize, coordinate, evaluate and share information from five workshops held between 2015 and 2020. These workshops will provide attendees the foundation to target, design, and implement conservation pr ... more.

Sequential NLEAP simulations to examine effect of early and late planted winter cover crops on nitrogen dynamics.

In different studies conducted during the last 10 years, underground well water NO3−-N concentrations have been found to exceed drinking water standards of 10 mg NO3−-N L−1 (10 ppm) for some areas of the San Luis Valley of south central Colorado. <span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%;Calibri" ,"sans-serif";times="" new="" roman";times="" roman";"="">Sequential NLEAP ... more.

Research and Tech Briefs June 2010

... Hays and Tribune, Kan., and theUniversity of Nebraska at Sidney. Algae Put to Work Algae may become a biofuel source in the future, but could be employed todayto remove nitrogen and phosphorus in livestock manure runoff, according to the Agricultural Research Service (ARS).This may be an option for reducing nutrient delivery to the Chesapeake Bay and other water bodies. More... Natural Resources Inventory Details Trends in Conservation Agriculture The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently released new data on soil erosion and development trends on non-federal lands. This latest National Resources Inventory (NRI), focused onthe years between 1982 and 2007,highlights data suggesting thatthat soil erosion has ... more.

Using Cover Crops to Facilitate the Transition to Continuous No-Till

... no-till works to reverse these problems. • Cover crops reduce soil compaction and improve carbon inputs and nitrogen recycling. • As soil organic matter levels build, more nitrogen and phosphorus are efficiently recycled and released to the soil through increased microbial populations. • Nitrogen losses decrease as soil compaction decreases, due to improved water infiltration. • Ultimately, soil nutrient storage, water infiltration, soil structure and soil tilth improve. The benefits of cover crops may help the soil’s ecological balance be restored in two to four years, rather than seven to nine. Soil type and prior management will influence the time required for these changes. With dedicated effort and the input of cons ... more.

Research and Technology Briefs Dec 2008

... Redux.” Robertson and the Ecological Society of America are encouraging development of policy programs to provide incentives for ethanol producers to follow proper management and use appropriate conservation practices. To view ESA's position statement on biofuel sustainability, visit: www.esa.org/pao/policyStatements/Statements/biofuel.php EPA Promotes Safe Drinking Water with New Brochure A new brochure from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) made its debut at the National FFA Convention in late October. The brochure is intended to provide access to key information on best agricultural practices to protect sources of drinking water. The target audience is high school ag science students, their advisors and instructors, as well as a broader agricultur ... more.

Grassed Waterway

Shaping and establishing grass in a natural drainage way to prevent gullies from forming. How it works A natural drainage way is graded and shaped to form a smooth, bowl-shaped channel. This area is seeded to sod-forming grasses. Runoff water that flows down the drainage way flows across the grass rather than tearing away soil and forming a larger gully. An outlet is often installed at the base of the drainage way to stabilize the waterway and prevent a new gully from forming. How it helps Grass cover protects the drainage way from gully erosion. Vegetation may act as a filter, absorbing some of the chemicals and nutrients i ... more.

MIDWEST SOIL IMPROVEMENT SYMPOSIUM

Join CTIC and GYPSOIL for a major symposium on soil quality presented by research scientists, producers and crop consultants. The event will be held at Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio, on March 7, 2013.

COVER CROP FIELD DAYS

CTIC's cover crop projects are working with numerous partners to bring quality field days to producers throughout our project areas. Click here to find details about the many events.

USING COVER CROPS TO FACILITATE THE TRANSITION TO CONTINUOUS NO-TILL

... cover crops into the transitioning farmer’s continuous no-till system Form social support networks in Indiana and Ohio for farmers who are transitioning to continuous no-till Develop an online and printed cover crop matrix for the Midwest which aids farmers in choosing the correct cover crop for their location and operation Extensive soil quality testing to show the benefits of cover crops paired with no-till For More Information Contact Chad Watts, CTIC Project Director, at Tel: 574.242.0147 or Email: watts@ctic.org. Get Involved Assist with promotion of the project to generate participation among farmers and recognition of the benefits of cover crops and continuous no-till. Provide financial suppo ... more.

National Farmers Union

CTIC Institutional Bronze Member, the National Farmers Union, was founded in 1902 in Point, Texas, to help the family farmer address profitability issues and monopolistic practices. NFU has been working since 1902 to protect and enhance the economic well-being and quality of life for family farmers, ranchers and rural communities through advocating grassroots-driven policy positions adopted by its membership. To learn more about the National Farmers Union, visit www.nfu.org.

Yetter Manufacturing

CTIC Corporate Member, Yetter Manufacturing, is committed toward providing you with products built for years of use. From design to final assembly, Yetter products are constructed to withstand the rigors of even the toughest field conditions. They have a relentless pursuit of quality and are always looking for ways to improve equipment while controlling the cost of the final product. To learn more about Yetter Manufacturing, visit www.yetterco.com.

Bayer CropScience

CTIC Bronze Corporate Member, Bayer CropScience, has a vision to be a leading partner in providing innovative products and combined solutions for the production of quality food, feed and fiber to meet the global challenges of tomorrow. To learn more about Bayer CropScience, visit www.bayercropscience.com.

Cover Crop Workshop (August 25, 2009)

Tuesday, August 25th 9am to 5pm East Main Street Christian Church Elwood, Indiana Presentations from the meeting are below: Cover Crops, No-till, and Soil Quality, Dan Towery Indiana Specific Niches, Dave Robison You have heard about the benefits of cover crops, now learn how to make them work! Spend the day with an all star cast of speakers from Purdue University, NRCS, Michigan State University, CISCO seeds and Ag Conservation Solutions and learn how to use cover crops on your operation. The Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC ... more.

Components of a IPM Plan

... your pests Today, we are armed with improved controls of weeds, insects and diseases. The arsenal of management strategies available allows for better control with less environmental risk. Know your action thresholds Just the presence of weeds or pests doesn’t justify the application of a control measure. The weed and pest pressure must be a threat to reduce yields or quality enough to make sense. This level of pressure to justify a control measure is called the action threshold. Know your fields Scouting is following a routine designed to detect a weed or pest problem that is serious enough (action threshold) to trigger a control measure. Know your options There are numerous approaches to effectively controlling problems. Resistant plants, cultural co ... more.

Topics A-Z

For over 28 years, CTIC has been collecting and disseminating information on agricultural conservation. From air quality to yield, we have information to share. Click on the first letter of your topic to see the resources we have available. Don't see what you're looking for? E-mail us at ctic@ctic.org.

Top Ten IPM Tips

... damage and saving spray applications. 4. Biological Controls: Growers should promote and attract many natural enemies that can inhibit pest populations. Import and use additional biologicals where cost effective. 3. Thresholds: Before treating, the pest population should reach a level that could cause economic damage. Until that threshold is reached, the cost of yield and quality will be far less than the cost for control. 2. Chemical Controls: Growers select the most effective and appropriate pesticide and properly calibrate sprayer. Weather conditions are checked prior to spraying to confirm proper coverage and minimum drift. 1. Record Keeping: Records of soil management, planting dates, weather data, treatments and other appropriate information are ... more.

Connecting People

... starts with people, each bringing perspective on what's needed and how to address the economic and environmental challenges in the field. For 3 decades, CTIC has provided the forum for people to connect across boundaries, bringing together people from government, academia, agribusiness, the non-profit community and the farm to find ways to put conservation into action. Indian Creek Watershed Project The Indian Creek Watershed Project brought together farmers and other stakeholders in a central Illinois watershed in a remarkable collaboration that resulted in conservation practices being adopted on at least 57% of the agricultural acreage in the watershed and measurable reductions in nutrients in the creek. The project yielded perspective on conservation practices from demonstr ... more.

What We Do

CTIC champions, promotes, and provides information on technologies and sustainable agricultural systems that conserve and enhance soil, water, air and wildlife resources and are productive and profitable. Lead Projects CTIC is a leader and collaborator in projects that address conservation agriulture's most important topics. Funded by public investments, foundation grants, agribusiness and private donations, our projects provide insight into agricultural systems that are both economically and environmentally beneficial. ... more.

Who We Are

... researchers, agribusiness leaders, conservation group personnel, farm media, and others. The organization is supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, and other public entities. It is our mission to champion, promote and provide information on technologies and sustainable agricultural systems that conserve and enhance soil, water, air and wildlife resources and are productive and profitable View our Information Brochure.

Demonstration: Slow Release Fertilizer

... of the acres and rotate planting of corn and soybeans on the rest of the land. Their minimum tillage practices leave at least 30% of the previous crops’ residue on the soil surface. This residue decreases soil erosion and feeds nutrients back to the soil. They apply nitrogen after the corn plants emerge, when nutrient needs are the greatest. This minimizes nitrogen lost to air and water. To maximize efficiency, farmers must select the right nutrient source. A controlled-release nitrogen source such as Koch Agronomic Service’s Agrotain® may offer benefits. Agrotain® blocks the enzyme urease to prevent nitrogen loss, which begins the moment the farmer applies fertilizer or manure. Losses add up over time, decreasing profitability and increasing nitrogen’s ... more.

Training

... Agency (EPA), CTIC provides leadership and technical support for 5 workshops between 2015 and 2020 that teach Certified Crop Advisors, ag retailers and other agronomic consultants to identify conservation systems that could benefit their clients' farms, then connect them with technical and financial support for implementation. Practices include in-field nutrient management, drainage water management systems, bioreactors, saturated buffers and more.

What’s happening at CTIC?

... Shore of Maryland on July 10 and 11 for our 11thannual Conservation in Action Tour. For more than a decade, we’ve been bringing together people from across the country with different perspectives on conservation agriculture for a front row view of the latest and best management practices. This year’s theme, “Bringing Back the Bay: Partnerships, Profitable Farms, Clean Water, & Innovative Conservation,” will highlight several Maryland farmers who are leading the way in conservation efforts and the partnerships that help them succeed. Click hereto register! The designated tour hotel is the Westin of Annapolis.Time is running out to secure the block rate,so please make sure you book your room by the deadline,June 8. The Westin is ... more.

What’s happening at CTIC?

... Shore of Maryland on July 10 and 11 for our 11thannual Conservation in Action Tour. For more than a decade, we’ve been bringing together people from across the country with different perspectives on conservation agriculture for a front row view of the latest and best management practices. This year’s theme, “Bringing Back the Bay: Partnerships, Profitable Farms, Clean Water, & Innovative Conservation,” will highlight several Maryland farmers who are leading the way in conservation efforts and the partnerships that help them succeed. Click hereto register! The designated tour hotel is the Westin of Annapolis. Book your room by June 8 to secure the block rate. The Westin is honoring the block rate three days before the tour and three days post-to ... more.

What’s happening at CTIC?

... Corn Marketing Council Indiana Soybean Alliance Innovation Center for U.S.Dairy Iowa Farm Bureau Federation IPNI James Lake John Deere Joseph Glassmeyer Land Pro LLC Larry Heatherly Michael Adsit Monsanto National Association of Conservation Districts National Corn Growers Association National Council of Farmer Cooperatives No-Till Farmer Scott Fritz Soil & Water Conservation Society Steve Bruere The Fertilizer Institute The Nature Conservancy Timothy Healey Truax Company, Inc. To renew, please email Crystal Hatfield at hatfield@ctic.org or call 765-494-9555.

WHAT WE DO

CTIC champions, promotes and provides information on technologies and sustainable agricultural systems that conserve and enhance soil, water, air and wildlife resources and are productive and profitable.

NATIONAL AQUATIC RESOURCES WORKSHOPS

This national workshop will bring together EPA, State, Tribal and other partners working on water monitoring issues across waterbody types to discuss and share information on the national aquatic resource surveys and their relationship to other state/tribal programs, provide technical training and tools so that States, Tribes and other partners can build their capacity to implement aquatic resource surveys at multiple scales (data management, analysis, interpretation) and to rovide examples o ... more.

NATIONAL AQUATIC RESOURCES WORKSHOPS

This national workshop will bring together EPA, State, Tribal and other partners working on water monitoring issues across waterbody types to discuss and share information on the national aquatic resource surveys and their relationship to other state/tribal programs, provide technical training and tools so that States, Tribes and other partners can build their capacity to implement aquatic resource surveys at multiple scales (data management, analysis, interpretation) and to rovide examples o ... more.

2014 Achievements

... The first-ever CTIC Dialogues briefed Washington, DC, staffers on how good policy yields good conservation. • The 6th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture brought people from 51 countries to Winnipeg to share their insight and BMPs. • We hosted a hypoxia panel for leading farm journalists at the Agricultural Media Summit. • Our Indian Creek Watershed Project yielded a highly successful tour and three great presentations at the 2014 International Soil and Water Conservation Society Annual Conference. • We kicked off our 2.5-year Economic, Agronomic and Environmental Benefits of Cover Crops CIG project. • Our 7th annual Conservation in Action Tour brought more than 150 conservation-minded participants to Florida for a look at ... more.

Agriculture and Water in Florida

Richard Budell

Everglades Restoration Progress

South Florida Water Management District

Below the Surface: An In-depth Look at Stormwater Treatment Areas

South Florida Water Management District

Mixtures and cocktails: Soil is meant to be covered

Penn State University, University of Maryland, and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service have all been testing various soil parameters on the Cedar Meadow Farm. Groff, Steve. 2008. Mixtures and cocktails: Soil is meant to be covered. J. Soil Water Conserv. 63(4):110A-111A.

The gap between cover crop knowledge and practice

Cover crops can provide a multitude of environmental benefits, including reducing soil erosion, minimizing nitrogen leaching, and increasing soil carbon storage (Delgado et al. 2007; Singer et al. 2007; Hargrove 1991). Anderson-Wilk, M. 2008. The gap between cover crop knowledge and practice. J. Soil Water Conserv. 63(4):96A.

Biological and biochemical soil properties in no-till corn with different cover crops.

Cover cropping impacts soil properties in many positive ways. These include higher total carbon, which usually contributes to increased cation exchange capacity and water-holding capacity. <span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%;Calibri" ,"sans-serif";times="" new="" roman";times="" roman";"="">Biological and biochemical soil properties in no-till corn with different cover crops.

Monsanto

Monsanto works with farmers from around the world to make agriculture more productive and sustainable. We've strengthened our goal of doubling crop yields by committing to doing it with one-third fewer resources such as land, water and energy per unit produced. We're working with our partners to develop conservation systems that are better for the plant.

The Mosaic Company

The Mosaic Company's mission is to help the world grow the food it needs. As the world's largest supplier of phosphate and potash, we consider this mission to be a compelling one that carries vast responsibilities. From water conservation and energy efficiency to stringent safety programs and community investment, sustainability is embedded in virtually everything we do. We believe that lasting success comes from making smart choices about our stewardship of the environment, how we engage our people, and how we manage our resources. The Mosaic Company is a long and active sponsor of CTIC activities.

Livingston County Soil and Water Conservation District

Provides local technical assistance, contact with area producers and guidance for project outreach and growth.

SWCS ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The Soil and Water Conservation Society will hold their 67th annual conference in Fort Worth, Texas from July 22-25, 2012. This year's conference theme is "Choosing Conservation: Considering Ecology, Economics and Ethics" and will feature presentations, workshops, symposia, and technical tours to facilitate the sharing of resource conservation knowledge. In honor of our 30th anniversary celebrat ... more.

Slow Release Fertilizer

... of the acres and rotate planting of corn and soybeans on the rest of the land. Their minimum tillage practices leave at least 30% of the previous crops’ residue on the soil surface. This residue decreases soil erosion and feeds nutrients back to the soil. They apply nitrogen after the corn plants emerge, when nutrient needs are the greatest. This minimizes nitrogen lost to air and water. To maximize efficiency, farmers must select the right nutrient source. A controlled-release nitrogen source such as Koch Agronomic Service’s Agrotain® may offer benefits. Agrotain® blocks the enzyme urease to prevent nitrogen loss, which begins the moment the farmer applies fertilizer or manure. Losses add up over time, decreasing profitability and increasing nitro ... more.

CONSERVATION TILLAGE SYSTEMS

Agricultural conservation systems produce good yields and strong profits while responsibly managing environmental resources. These systems efficiently manage nutrients and pests, control irrigation and drainage water flows, use cover crops, rotate crops to maximize conservation benefits and minimize equipment wear. See CTIC's conservation systems information sheet HERE.

CTIC Commemorates 30 Years at SWCS Annual Meeting

CTIC took a party theme to the 67th International Annual Conference of the Soil and Water Conservation Society, titled "Choosing Conservation: Considering Ecology, Economics and Ethics," held July 22-25 in Fort Worth, Texas. Our exhibit stood out with balloons and festive gift bags to celebrate our 30 years of service to agriculture. Karen Scanlon, CTIC executive director, and Chad Watts, CTIC project director, talked with co ... more.

Agri Drain Corp

CTIC Silver Corporate Member, Agri Drain Corp, America's most complete supplier of water management products for wetlands, ponds, lakes, controlled drainage, and subsurface irrigation with the best guarantee. To learn more about Agri Drain Corp, visit www.agridrain.com

No-Till Farming Systems & Companion CD

No-Till Farming Systems The highly anticipated World Association of Soil and Water Conservation - Special Publication No. 3 - No-Till Farming Systems book has been released in the United States. As co-publisher, CTIC is honored to be the designated U.S. distributor. "No-till farming systems have been developed and applied around the world over several decades. The technology is dynamic: it develops and changes as we overcome obstacles in soil opening, seed placement, ... more.

America's Wetlands - Our Vital Link Between Land and Water

This full-color publication defines a wetland, describes the role of wetlands, wetlands protection, and status and trends associated with wetlands. Developed and published by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

National Association of Conservation Districts

... that represents America’s 3,000 conservation districts and the 17,000 men and women who serve on their governing boards. Conservation districts are local units of government established under state law to carry out natural resource management programs at the local level. Districts work with millions of cooperating landowners and operators to help them manage and protect land and water resources on all private lands and many public lands in the United States.NACD's mission is to serve conservation districts by providing national leadership and a unified voice for natural resource conservation. To learn more about NACD, visit www.NACDnet.org

Environmental Resources Coalition

CTIC Institutional Gold Member, Environmental Resources Coalition (ERC), believes that it's possible for government, private industry, and citizen stakeholder groups to work together. They understand that when it comes to water protection efforts, one size does not fit all. Successful groups will use sound science, common sense and have an appreciation for the cause and effect relationships between economics, the environment and politics. To learn more about Environmental Resources Coalition, visit www.erc-env.org/.

WHAT WE DO

CTIC champions, promotes and provides information on technologies and sustainable agricultural systems that conserve and enhance soil, water, air and wildlife resources and are productive and profitable.

Small Community Wastewater Tracking Solutions Workshop

Providing communities with the tools to research and adopt a viable solution for their waste water treatment. This workshop is designed to introduce participants to two free database management tools that can help improve wastewater management efforts in your communities. When: October 7 and 8, 2010 Photo courtesy of NRCS Where: Pike Bay Town Hall &nbs ... more.

Protecting the Environment

By facilitating the switch to conservation tillage, biotech crops have helped dramatically reduce soil erosion and water pollution, increase carbon sequestration, and lower the use of crop protection chemicals by millions of pounds per year.

Nutrients in Our Environment - Past, Present, and Beyond (February 18, 2010)

... fertilizer and livestock manure are recognized assets to agricultural operations. They both contain essential plant nutrients which enhance crop yields when properly applied to soils. Nutrients can be managed efficiently with the latest techniques and technologies, to avoid the potential financial and environmental risks of nitrogen and phosphorus reaching surface and ground water. Learn about research developments and new tools for improving on-farm nutrient efficiency. Contact:brian.c.williams@state.mn.us Please register by calling 651-201-6141. Your fee of $10 at the door will cover your refreshments and lunch. Conference Presentations Speaker Contact Information and Biographies News Release Download Confer ... more.

Tillage Type Definitions

... but may also be in pounds. CRM is an “umbrella” term encompassing several tillage systems including no-till, ridge-till, mulch-till, and reduced-till. Conservation Tillage Types (30 percent or more crop residue left, after planting). Any tillage and planting system that covers 30 percent or more of the soil surface with crop residue, after planting, to reduce soil erosion by water. Where soil erosion by wind is the primary concern, any system that maintains at least 1,000 pounds per acre of flat, small grain residue equivalent on the surface throughout the critical wind erosion period. No-till/strip-till The soil is left undisturbed from harvest to planting except for strips up to 1/3 of the row width (strips may involve only residue disturbance or may include soil ... more.

Upcoming Events June 2010

Upcoming Events July Soil and Water Conservation Society Annual Conference July 18-21,2010, St. Louis, Mo. Fellows Forum, Sunday, July 18th, 2010:“Gulf Hypoxia – A Midwest Perspective” The 32nd Southern Conservation Agriculture Systems Conference: Conservation Agriculture Impacts--Local and Global July 20-22, 2010,Jackson and Milan, Tenn. ... more.

Date and Location Set for 2009 Conservation in Action Tour

... tour will feature stops in western Illinois! An engrossed group of Conservation In Action Tour participants listens to a discussion at one of the Beck's Hybrids seed company's greenhouses. Photo Courtesy of Purity Mason Side-by-side demonstration models at Rulon Enterprises show how ground water appears in a conventional tilled field (left) versus a no-till field (right) with residue on the soil surface. Photo Courtesy of Purity Mason At Lamb Farms, drywall scrap from construction projects is ground into gypsum and spread on fields as a soil amendment. Photo courtesy of Randall Reeder ... more.

Research and Technology Briefs

... say farmers who apply manure as a fertilizer to their no-till field can decrease the chance that pathogens end up in runoff, which can pose environmental and health hazards. These researchers studied the transport of Cryptosporidium – a parasite present in animal waste – through no-till and tilled fields. They found that a greater amount of the parasite moved along with excess water through no-till fields and into tile drains than in tilled fields, especially during a rain event. However, they say, by following a few simple recommendations, pathogens in runoff can be reduced. For the full story, visit www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/newsitem.asp?id=5501. New report outlines trade-offs of biofuel production The Ecological Society of America (ESA) recently re ... more.

John Deere Advances Stewardship in Agriculture

... sustainability from an industry perspective, in relation to sustainable agriculture,” Mann says. Increasing efficiency and precision in the application of inputs is one way agricultural producers can approach sustainability. With the right tools and technology, producers are reducing fuel use and emissions, keeping nutrients and chemicals on the field and reducing runoff to nearby waterways, Mann says. Precision and efficiency Last year, Deere spent more than $2.5 million per day on research and development, Mann says. That investment in efficiency and technology is paying off for the company, for producers and for the environment. For example, Mann says, Deere’s smallest U.S.-made combine is more productive than Deere’s largest machine of jus ... more.

April Research & Technology Briefs

... Research Service (ARS) have improved the precision of calculating the costs and benefits of using conservation tillage in cotton production. Learn more at this web site: www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2009/090317.htm. EPA Announces Video Contest The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will award $2,500 to the winning video that educates homeowners, farmers and communities about water pollution issues. Video submissions must be 30- or 60-second video that can be used as a TV public service announcement or a 1- to 3-minute instructional video (one winner in each category). The deadline for submitting videos to EPA is Earth Day, April 22, 2009. Get more details at: www.epa.gov/owow/videocontest.html. Three Factors Sent Farm Prices Up, Same Three Driving Prices ... more.

CTIC Welcomes New Members

... In fact, the company is the leading international producer of nitrogen products for agricultural, industrial and environmental markets. Terra owns and operates nitrogen manufacturing facilities in six North American locations and own 50 percent interest in joint ventures in the United Kingdom and The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Terra takes pride in protecting the land, air and water and having superior customer relations in the communities in which they operate. Since 1987, Terra has reduced their nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions by about 80 percent by installing selective catalytic reduction systems in its facilities and has implemented projects to reduce toxic emissions of ammonia, nitrate and methanol. Currently, the company is installing low-NOx burners and greenhouse aba ... more.

Wildlife Upland Habitat

... help protect? How close do you want the habitat area to your farmstead? Tech notes Plant the wildlife area with a vegetative cover of grass, trees or shrubs. Exclude livestock. To attract a specific wildlife species, choose cover and habitat for that species. Create a diverse habitat to attract a wider variety of wildlife. Consult with a local wildlife biologist, Soil & Water Conservation District, Natural Resources Conservation Service, or wildlife group in your area for local recommendations. Include a food plot if possible. Encourage shrub growth between woodlands and grasslands. Include bird houses and feeding stations in habitat areas. Plant fruit and nut bearing trees or shrubs to the windward side of a woodland habitat area. Maintenance Prescrib ... more.

Wildlife Food Plot

... supplies are in short supply. How it helps Standing crops with unharvested grain give food to wildlife that may otherwise not be accessible after heavy snows or ice. A food plot helps maintain wildlife on your farm by providing food. Planning ahead Will the crop you plan to plant or leave standing in the field attract the wildlife you want? Is there adequate cover and water near the food plot to support wildlife? Are you endangering wildlife by placing the food plot too close to high traffic areas? Tech notes Planting dates range from March 1 to June 15 depending on the crop. * Food plots should be planted on the least erosive areas of the selected field. Plots on slopes steeper than 5% should be planted on the contour. A plot can be planted on t ... more.

Animal Waste Management Site - Great Lakes Regional Water Program

Initiatives, publications, and opportunities for multi-state collaboration in animal waste management.

Cover Crop

A close-growing crop that temporarily protects the soil when crop residues are not adequate. How it works Crops including cereal rye, oats, clover, hairy vetch, and winter wheat are planted to temporarily protect the ground from wind and water erosion during times when cropland isn't adequately protected against soil erosion. How it helps Cover crops keep ground covered, add organic matter to the soil, trap nutrients, improve soil tilth and reduce weed competition. Planning ahead Do you have a seeding method that won't harm standing crops? Are adequate soil conservation measures installed? Tech notes C ... more.

What is a Crop Nutrient Management Plan?

... areas. What’s out of the ordinary about your field plan? Is it irrigated? Next to a stream or lake? Especially sandy in one area? Steep slope or low area? Manure applied in one area for generations due to proximity of dairy barn? Extremely productive—or unproductive—in a portion of the field? Are there buffers that protect streams, drainage ditches, wellheads, and other water collection points? How far away are the neighbors? What’s the general wind direction? This is the place to note these and other special conditions. 7. Recommended rates. Here’s the place where science, technology, and art meet. Given everything you’ve noted, what is the optimum rate of N-P-K, lime, and any other nutrients. While science tells us your crop has changing nutri ... more.

Swine Manure Testing Project

The Upper Wabash Nutrient Management Coalition is working with the Grand Lake/Wabash Watershed Alliance (GLWWA) to collect data on swine manure nutrient content. The GLWWA’s watershed action plan, endorsed by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, includes objectives related to agriculture. Many focus on reducing nutrient loading to streams. Nutrient loads can be reduced by addressing erosion problems and using best management ... more.

McLean County Soil & Water Conservation District