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KNOW YOUR WATERSHED

Know Your Watershed is a coordinated national effort to encourage the formation of local, voluntary watershed partnerships and help assure that these partnerships successfully attain their goals. The initiative is sponsored by more than 70 diverse National Partners representing private and public corporations, government agencies, and non-profit organizations. Each National Partner agrees to provide financial and/or ... more.

Additional Resources

... Consultant Resources Bees and Pollinators Buffer Strips Community Organizing Conservation Tillage Conservation Practices—Adoption Crop Residue Management (CRM) Survey Drainage Water Management Cover Crops Cover Crop Survey Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) Demonstration Projects Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) Grazing and Rangeland Hypoxia Know Your Watershed Leadership Mississippi River Basin Initiative (MRBI) No-Till National Aquatic Resource Survey (NARS) National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) Nutrient Management Operational Tillage Assessment System (OpTIS) Pasture Ridge Till Soil Health Strip Till Tours Training Water Quality Watershed Groups Watershed Implementation and Innovation Network (WIIN) Weed Management Wetlands ... more.

Watershed Management Starter Kit

Watershed Management Starter Kit This complete kit includes seven guides (Getting to Know Your Watershed, Building Local Partnerships, Putting Together a Watershed Management Plan, Managing Conflict, Leading and Communicating, and two others), a 13-minute dvd video (Partnerships for Watersheds), companion brochure and an application to the National Watershed Network. In other words, it includes everything you need to get started!

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Know Your Watershed Livestock Waste Management Core 4

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Components of a IPM Plan

Components of a Plan Know your pests Today, we are armed with improved controls of weeds, insects and diseases. The arsenal of management strategies available allows for better control with less environmental risk. Know your action thresholds Just the presence of weeds or pests doesn’t justify the application of a control measure. The weed and pest pressure must be a threat to reduce yields or quality en ... more.

Trading Up for Water Quality

... anticipating, initially, the biggest traders from the nonpoint-source aspect being agricultural producers,” Fox says. “Partly, we anticipate their involvement, as they have the ability to cost effectively and most easily reduce nitrogen and phosphorus discharges into water bodies through various farming management practices along water bodies.” Understanding what producers know, don’t know and are concerned with regarding water quality trading is an important step, Fox says. “Through our project collaborator American Farmland Trust, we’ve reached out to farmers with listening sessions in several areas to get their perspective,” she says. “We want to make sure this project is amiable for all groups. And, we’re especially sensitive ... more.

Trading Up for Water Quality

... anticipating, initially, the biggest traders from the nonpoint-source aspect being agricultural producers,” Fox says. “Partly, we anticipate their involvement, as they have the ability to cost effectively and most easily reduce nitrogen and phosphorus discharges into water bodies through various farming management practices along water bodies.” Understanding what producers know, don’t know and are concerned with regarding water quality trading is an important step, Fox says. “Through our project collaborator American Farmland Trust, we’ve reached out to farmers with listening sessions in several areas to get their perspective,” she says. “We want to make sure this project is amiable for all groups. And, we’re especially sensi ... more.

Indian Creek Watershed Project

... to share with conservation leaders in other watersheds, including a booklet and video on leadership lessons and partnership development based on experiences from the project. A series of fact sheets—distributed to farmers, ag retailers, and crop consultants by CTIC and the local Soil and Water Conservation District—captured key lessons from the project, including: Creating your own demonstration plots Establishing and managing cover crops Spring and split applications of nitrogen Understanding MERN Using enhanced-efficiency nitrogen sources Six video vignettes profiled farmers active in the project, detailing their conservation practices. The CTIC website for the project logged nearly 20,000 page views during the funding period. Project Sponsors and Pa ... more.

What is a Crop Nutrient Management Plan?

What's a Crop Nutrient Management plan? A Crop Nutrient Management plan is a tool to increase the efficiency of all the nutrient sources your crop uses while reducing production and environmental risk, ultimately, increasing profit. 10 KEY COMPONENTS Ag experts agree that there are ten fundamental components of a Crop Nutrient Management Plan. Each component is critical to helping you analyze each field and improve nutrient efficiency for the crops you grow. 1. Field map. The map, including general re ... more.

WATERSHED NETWORKING SESSIONS AND WORKSHOPS

... 2009 Agenda Presentations Which Data Are Important and Why Using Data to Support Watershed Protection & Restoration Decisions Watershed Planning and Management Water Quality Standards & Other Regulatory Issues Permitting, Funding and Project Coordination Integrating Watershed Management Into Your Local Government May 2009 Agenda Presentations Where Watershed Planning Fits Into Local Planning and Regulation Make Yourself and Your WMP Relevant to Local Leaders Networking Session: Sharing Successes, Challenges and More November 2008 Notes from Open Discussion: Crawfordsville Networking Session ... more.

About

Facilitated by CTIC, local farmers and interested others lead this project to demonstrate and test best conservation practices on Indian Creek Watershed farms. The project, sponsored by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (with funds provided through Section 319 of the Clean Water Act) will show how conservation practices installed on Indian Creek watershed farms will affect water quality. Goal Determine what water quality improvements result when 50-75% of producers and acres in a small watershed a ... more.

Apply gypsum to your fields to balance soil structure, Improve nutrient uptake, and yield heartier, healthier crops

Apply gypsum to your fields to balance soil structure, Improve nutrient uptake, and yield heartier, healthier crops There are thousands of agricultural products that claim to increase yields—from the latest hybrids to implements and electronic gadgetry. As a grower, you do everything it takes to maximize output with the least amount of input costs. But as input prices continu ... more.

FREE WEBINAR ON FARMER INVOLVEMENT

... Number: 829 898 065 Meeting Password: Ctic2# --------------------------------------------------------------------- To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!) --------------------------------------------------------------------- 1. Go to https://nethope.webex.com/nethope/j.php?ED=176062102&UID=1245109552&PW=NYjRjNzM5YTQ4&RT=MiM3 2. If requested, enter your name and email address. 3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: Ctic2# 4. Click "Join". To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link: https://nethope.webex.com/nethope/j.php?ED=176062102&UID=1245109552&PW=NYjRjNzM5YTQ4&ORT=MiM3 ------------------------------------------------------------------- To join the teleconf ... more.

MARKET FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENT: WABASH RIVER BASIN WATER QUALITY TRADING

Gulf of Mexico hypoxia issues pose a significant challenge in addressing the protection of the marine environment given the sheer magnitude of excess nutrient loading and the size of the contributing Mississippi River watershed. This nutrient loading is a result of cumulative nutrientdischarges across the largest river basin in North America, the Mississippi River Basin. The Wabash River watershed contributes a significant nutrient load, from portions ofIndiana, Illinois, and Ohio,to the Ohio River, the Mississippi River, and eventually, the Gulf of Mexico. Recent Total Maximum Daily Loads developed to ... more.

CTIC project updates

... publications, environmental media and local newspapers to highlight environmental improvements by farmers and to inspire others to protect water quality. We’re looking for examples of great on-farm projects where voluntary nutrient management practices, habitat restoration and/or structural improvements are reducing nutrient loading and other water quality impairments. If you know of a project or a farmer that fits this description, contact Chad Watts at watts@ctic.org. OpTIS: CTIC is currently working with Applied GeoSolutions, a data analytics company based out of New Hampshire, to refine and implement a remote sensing-based system that estimates crop residue amounts and determines the presence or absence of cover crops on cropland. Through this technology, cal ... more.

Webinar: TARGETED BMPS TO MAXIMIZE RUNOFF REDUCTION

... 28th is a great start." To participate online or by phone, sign in at least 10 minutes early and follow these instructions: Topic: Pecatonica River watershed project Date: Thursday, February 28, 2013 Time: 1:00 pm, Central Standard Time (Chicago, GMT-06:00) Meeting Number: 821 566 130 Meeting Password: S10Chevy To join the online meeting click here. Teleconference information Provide your phone number when you join the meeting to receive a call back. Alternatively, you can call: Call-in toll-free number: 1-866-3859623 (US) Call-in number: 1-443-8636602 (US) Show global numbers: click here. Conference Code: 586 574 2199 For assistance 1. Go to nethope.webex.com/nethope/mc 2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support". To add this meeting to your calendar program (for e ... more.

WIIN WEBINAR - APRIL 25

... follow these instructions: Topic: Intro to WIIN Online Resource Date: Thursday, April 25, 2013 Time: 1:00 pm, Central Standard Time Meeting Number: 827 399 596 Meeting Password: Ctic2# To join the online meeting: 1. Go to https://nethope.webex.com/nethope/j.php?ED=183641952&UID=1271504992&PW=NOWRhNzZhN2Rk&RT=MiM3 2. If requested, enter your name and email address. 3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: Ctic2# 4. Click "Join". To join the teleconference only: Provide your phone number when you join the meeting to receive a call back. Alternatively, you can call 1-866-385-9623 (US) For more information on WIIN or the webinar, visit www.ctic.org/WIIN or call (765) 494-9555.

What’s happening at CTIC?

... website byclicking here. Next CTIC board of directors meeting has been scheduled All CTIC members are invited to join us around the table at CTIC's next board meeting in Annapolis, Maryland on July 12. The meeting will be held from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Westin, Annapolis.Click herefor a preliminary agenda. If you plan on joining us, please let us know by contacting our executive director, Chad Watts, at watts@ctic.org. Want to get involved? Join a CTIC committee If you’re looking for ways to get connected and share your ideas and goals within the conservation community, CTIC has several committees working to continue championing conservation agriculture. To get connected, contact our executive director Chad Watts at ... more.

Wastewater Treatment Plants Dewater Dairy Manure

... system involves signing a long-term maintenance and operation contract with ISS. “I'm not trying to turn a dairyman into a wastewater treatment operator,” says Josh, who monitors the systems remotely via Internet links with key components. “We log onto each dairy every morning. We'll often see a problem before they do, and we can call them to let them know they need to check a particular valve or push a reset button. The system is actually smart enough to turn something off if there's a problem and email us. The dairyman just needs to be comfortable around the equipment, be able to check some valves and pumps, and be able to tell us on the phone what they see.” Penciling Out Costs Josh Vrieze says a four-stage syste ... more.

Manure: What’s It Worth?

... variables that surround its use—from the cost to haul a comparatively low-octane fertilizer to the energy of soil microbes to the rules preventing its application where P rates are already high. At Purdue, Joern reminds producers and their advisors not to see manure management plans—even the best-designed ones—in absolute terms. “In a plan, you don’t know the weather, you don’t know everything that’s going to happen to influence that availability,” he notes. That quickly translates to influencing the value of manure. Proper Application: Big Shortcoming Determining crop need and manure nutrient content represent a pair of big challenges to producers. But a Michigan State University pa ... more.

CTIC project updates

... publications, environmental media and local newspapers to highlight environmental improvements by farmers and to inspire others to protect water quality. We’re looking for examples of great on-farm projects where voluntary nutrient management practices, habitat restoration and/or structural improvements are reducing nutrient loading and other water quality impairments. If you know of a project or a farmer that fits this description, contact Chad Watts at watts@ctic.org. OpTIS: CTIC is currently working with Applied GeoSolutions, a data analytics company based out of New Hampshire, to refine and implement a remote sensing-based system that estimates crop residue amounts and determines the presence or absence of cover crops on cropland. Through this technology, cal ... more.

CTIC project updates

... publications, environmental media and local newspapers to highlight environmental improvements by farmers and to inspire others to protect water quality. We’re looking for examples of great on-farm projects where voluntary nutrient management practices, habitat restoration and/or structural improvements are reducing nutrient loading and other water quality impairments. If you know of a project or a farmer that fits this description, contact Tammy Taylor attaylor@ctic.org OpTIS: CTIC is currently working with Applied GeoSolutions, a data analytics company based out of New Hampshire, to refine and implement a remote sensing-based system that estimates crop residue amounts and determines the presence or absence of cover crops on cropland. Through this technolo ... more.

CTIC project updates

... publications, environmental media and local newspapers to highlight environmental improvements by farmers and to inspire others to protect water quality. We’re looking for examples of great on-farm projects where voluntary nutrient management practices, habitat restoration and/or structural improvements are reducing nutrient loading and other water quality impairments. If you know of a project or a farmer that fits this description, contact Tammy Taylor attaylor@ctic.org OpTIS: CTIC is currently working with Applied GeoSolutions, a data analytics company based out of New Hampshire, to refine and implement a remote sensing-based system that estimates crop residue amounts and determines the presence or absence of cover crops on cropland. Through this technolo ... more.

Don't forget to renew your membership

Have you checked your mailbox for CTIC’s annual membership renewal notice? Renewing your membership helps us continue to make a difference in conservation agriculture and helps us continue to grow our organization. CTIC members play a critical role in spreading the message about how conservation practices can help improve soil and water quality, boost profitability and more. We couldn’t do it without you! ... more.

SAVE THE DATE

Mark your calendar for the 2013 Conservation In Action Tour, July 9 and 10 in Livingston County, Ill. We’ll be visiting the hub of several outstanding watershed conservation projects, with stops at demonstration plots, on-farm trials and in-stream water quality testing stations. More than 40 percent of the farm acreage in the 80-square-mile watershed is enrolled in conservation program ... more.

Connecting People

... starts with people, each bringing perspective on what's needed and how to address the economic and environmental challenges in the field. For 3 decades, CTIC has provided the forum for people to connect across boundaries, bringing together people from government, academia, agribusiness, the non-profit community and the farm to find ways to put conservation into action. Indian Creek Watershed Project The Indian Creek Watershed Project brought together farmers and other stakeholders in a central Illinois watershed in a remarkable collaboration that resulted in conservation practices being adopted on at least 57% of the agricultural acreage in the watershed and measurable reductions in nutrients in the creek. The project yielded perspective on conservation practices from demonstratio ... more.

What’s happening at CTIC?

... tour sponsorship can also be found on our website byclicking here. Next CTIC board of directors meeting has been scheduled All CTIC members are invited to join us around the table at CTIC's next board meeting in Annapolis, Maryland on July 12. The meeting will be held from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Westin, Annapolis. If you plan on joining us, please let us know by contacting our executive director, Chad Watts, at watts@ctic.org. New website and new e-magazine We're looking forward to launching our brand new website in the next month. With the launch of the new website, we will also be launching a new e-magazine calledConservation Conversations, which will be produced quarterly. Want to get involved? Join a CTIC c ... more.

What’s happening at CTIC?

... Tom Jensen on the CTIC board. Welcome, Heidi, and thank you, Tom, for serving CTIC! Next CTIC board of directors meeting has been scheduled All CTIC members are invited to join us around the table at CTIC's next board meeting in Annapolis, Maryland on July 12. The meeting will be held from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Westin, Annapolis. If you plan on joining us, please let us know by contacting our executive director, Chad Watts, at watts@ctic.org. New website and new e-magazine We're looking forward to launching our brand new website in the next month. With the launch of the new website, we will also be launching a new e-magazine calledConservation Conversations, which will be produced quarterly. Want to get involved? Join a CTIC c ... more.

Lessening the Pain

... he says. “If it’s after April 10, it’s corn planting time. Plant corn, and don’t put anhydrous on.” Instead, Towery says, apply nitrogen at 50 units with the planter and later as a sidedress. Sometimes, in extremely wet springs, applying nitrogen as a sidedress, before the corn gets too tall, can be a problem. But, it can be done. “I know farmers who plant thousands of acres, and they make it a priority,” Towery says. “They get it done.” Play it smart Towery says, regardless of tillage methods, farmers should evaluate ways to reduce compaction during wet seasons. “Eighty percent of compaction is caused by the first trip through the field,” Towery says. “The trick is to minimiz ... more.

Small Community Wastewater Tracking Solutions Workshop

... in" registration form click here. Lodging: The Place Casino is the closest hotel. Workshop participants are encouraged to stay there. For more information visit their website: http://www.palacecasinohotel.com/ If you prefer to pay at the workshop that is fine. Please call CTIC at 765-494-9555 and give us your name and phone number and let us know you will be attending the workshop so that we can have enough food for everyone.

International Meeting Spotlights Conservation Agriculture's Role in Mitigating Climate Change

... several hours at the end of the meeting's third day in a lively discussion, hammering out a position statement calling for the inclusion of soil carbon in worldwide carbon offset markets. (view the issue statement and accompanying overview of Conservation Agriculture.) "This has been one of the better meetings I've been to because the focus has been on ‘this is what we know, these are the answers we have, this is what we can accomplish today,' rather than focusing on the problems we have and what we don't know,” said Dan Uthe, an industrial process consultant with Novecta in Johnson, Iowa. The first day of the consultation was dedicated to exploring the science of soil carbon sequestration in the soil. Researchers from the South American tropics, ... more.

Hiram Boon, Delta Conservation Demonstration Center, Greenville, Miss.

... with other producers and organizations. The greatest benefits of our CTIC membership, I believe, are receiving the results of surveys conducted by CTIC, and having the opportunity to participate in work groups that are developing methods to resolve issues. By becoming a member of CTIC, you will have the opportunity to be better informed of what is happening in agriculture and get to know other partners that can help in solving issues of mutual concern. CTIC provides me with an opportunity to know and work with a dedicated staff that seeks to help all of its members become conservationists.

CTIC Project Updates

... environmental media and local newspapers to highlight environmental improvements by farmers and to inspire others to protect water quality. We're looking for examples of great on-farm projects where voluntary nutrient management practices, habitat restoration and/or structural improvements are reducing nutrient loading and other water quality impairments. If you know of a project or a farmer that fits this description, contact Tammy Taylor at taylor@ctic.org. OpTIS: CTIC is currently working with Applied GeoSolutions, a data analytics company based out of New Hampshire, to refine and implement a remote sensing-based system that estimates crop residue amounts and determines the presence or absence of cover crops on cropland. Through this techno ... more.

Planned Grazing System

... and improving water quality. Increases harvest efficiency and helps ensure adequate forage throughout the grazing season. Increases forage quality and production which helps increase feed efficiency and can improve profits. Rotating also evenly distributes manure nutrient resources. Planning ahead Is there enough water of good quality available in all pastures to meet the needs of your livestock? Is the mix of grass and legumes adequate for your herd and soil types? Will your pasture meet the nutrient needs of your cattle? Have you considered management alternatives for periods of low forage production? Tech notes Plan your rotation so the same paddocks will not be grazed the same time year after year. Plan rest periods so each pasture (paddock) will have adequa ... more.

Wildlife Upland Habitat

... How it works Planting trees, shrubs, grass and other vegetation that provide cover and food will attract wildlife to an area. The type of habitat provided will determine the kind and numbers of wildlife attracted. How it helps Ground cover helps reduce soil erosion, adds organic matter to the soil, filters runoff and increases infiltration. It can add value to your farmstead. Planned wildlife habitat provides food and cover for wildlife. Planning ahead Will your planned habitat attract the type of wildlife you want? Is a particular piece of land better suited for upland habitat than for livestock or crops? Do you plan to allow hunting? Are there any endangered or threatened species in your area you could help protect? How close do you want t ... more.

National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI)

CTIC is currently working with USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) on a project in support of NWQI. This project is identifying successful watershed management activities that engage landowners, farmers, and the broader public to protect water quality. Insights developed through this project will inform future NRCS efforts to support local watershed initiatives with technical and financial resources. As a first step, CTIC is convening watershed leaders from across the country at five forums to learn from their experience—successful o ... more.

Notes from the Chair of the CTIC Board of Directors

... support CTIC above their basic level will receive additional recognition at CTIC events, in this magazine and in other ways. To learn more about our new membership structure, click here. In late February, membership renewal letters were mailed to current members and these new enhanced categories are detailed in the accompanying brochure. If you haven't already done so, please send in your membership renewal today, or fill out the online form and we'll send you an invoice. Then, take a minute to look at all the events CTIC has planned for 2009 and plan to get involved. With membership support and engagement, CTIC will continue to fulfill its mission. On July 29, 2009, CTIC will host our third Conservation In Action Tour. On this one-day tour in western Illinois, we will v ... more.

CTIC Launches New Conservation Information Website

... satellite imagery to provide detailed data on tillage practices and cover crops at the county or watershed (HUC-8) scale; Cover crop insight, including details of the economic and environmental benefits of cover crops and the results of five annual farmer surveys on cover crop use; Tips on organizing watershed groups and multi-stakeholder conservation efforts, including tips, analysis of knowledge transfer, and ideas for creating effective demonstration plots; Real-world perspective on conservation farming practices and systems that help farmers build profitability and protect the quality of their soil, water and the air we breathe. CTIC's interim executive director, Dave Gustafson, points out that creating a new www.ctic.org site is central to the Center's mi ... more.

INDIAN CREEK FIELD TOUR JULY 7, 2011

Ag producers mark your calendars for July 7, 2011. Attend one of two duplicate farm tours that day. The morning tour will leave First Baptist Church in Fairbury, Ill., at 9:30 AM central time. The evening tour will leave the church at 3:00 PM central time. The church is located at 701 North 7th Street, Fairbury, IL 61739-1595. Participants will meet at the church then board a bus to visit the tour sit ... more.

What’s happening at CTIC?

2018 Conservation in Action Tour dates and location Mark your calendars! We are thrilled to announce that our 11thannual Conservation in Action Tour will take place on July 11 and 12 near the beautiful Chesapeake Bay in the Maryland and Washington D.C. area. More information will be announced as it is finalized in the coming months. We’re excited to continue bringing together people from across the country with different perspectives on co ... more.

Woodland Management

Improving the quality and quantity of woodland growing stock and maintaining ground cover and litter for soil and water conservation. How it works Existing woodland or other suitable land is dedicated to timber production. Livestock is excluded. Optimum tree populations are determined by the kinds of trees planted and their adaptability to your soils. Existing trees or newly planted trees are thinned, pruned and harvested to maintain desired production. Twigs, limbs and other debris are not removed, maintaining ground cover, reducing soil erosion and providing wildlife habitat. As trees mature they are harvested, and replacements are established. How it helps Adds income to your farm. Adds beauty to your farm. Ground cov ... more.

Well Protection

... it works The way you handle materials that could contaminate a water supply, and the distance of possible contaminants from a well or other water source, can have a dramatic effect on the quality of drinking water on the farm. For instance, if you typically mix pesticides near the well, your chances of drinking water contamination from pesticides escalates. To protect your well, take an inventory of farming practices like pesticide mixing and container washing and disposal. Then assess the risk of contamination and make necessary changes. How it helps Modifications in farming operations may improve your efficiency and reduce operation or production costs. Soil conservation ... more.

Economic and Environmental Benefits of Nutrient Management

Economic and Environmental Benefits Profit. Managing to maximize return on your cropping investment (ROI) requires the perfect combination of science, technology, art, and luck. Some factors, like the weather, still require a bit of luck. Thankfully, science and technology continue to make strides, reducing the impact of uncontrollable factors like the weather and markets. This reduces the risk inherent in farming. By using a plan to analyze the crop nutrient management port ... more.

Countour Strip Cropping

... to legumes allows nutrient-needy crops to benefit from the nitrogen added to the soil by legumes. This practice combines the beneficial effects of contouring and crop rotation. How it helps Contour stripcropping reduces soil erosion and protects water quality. Contour stripcropping may help reduce fertilizer costs. Planning ahead How many acres of row crops do you need? Does your crop rotation allow for alternating row crops with small grains and forages? Will herbicide carryover be a problem? Tech notes Row crop strips need to be nearly the same width as small grains or meadow. A 10% variance is allowed. Plant grass or legume field borders instead of end rows and establish waterways as part of your stripcropping system. Key lines used for laying out ... more.

CROP RESIDUE MANAGEMENT SURVEY

... the data. Since then, CTIC has encouraged local partners to collect the data on a voluntary basis. For more than two decades, the Survey has been used by government agencies, academic researchers, policy makers, industry, journalists, agriculture groups, conservation groups and many others to track trends in conservation tillage adoption. It is because we have this trend of data that we know no-till in 2004 was used on 45.5 million acres more than in 1990, a 269 percent increase. Some of the valuable ways Survey results are used include: assess successes of Farm Bill programs, state and local-level initiatives document what farmers save in fuel usage at the county, state and national levels track the progress of, and measure trends in, conservation tillage adoption ... more.

Promoting Conservation

CTIC promotes conservation practices by raising awareness of the benefits of conservation, providing detailed information on successful implementation of practices, and sharing perspective on the needs and real-world challenges facing farmers trying to protect soil, water and air quality as well as their economic sustainability. Watershed Success Forums Working with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) through the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI), CTIC is identifying successful watershed management activities that engage landowners, farmers, and the broader public to protect water quality. Five forums in five states are yielding a guide for NRCS, partners and stakeholders on organizing local watershed ... more.

National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI)

CTIC is working with USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to improve the effective engagement by NRCS in delivering watershed projects and to enhance the agency's ability to communicate the issues and success of watershed projects. This project is identifying successful watershed management activities that engage landowners, farmers, and the broader public to protect water quality. Insights developed through this project will inform future NRCS efforts to support local watershed initiatives with technical and financ ... more.

The Mosaic Company

Working with Partnerships The Mosaic Company and The Mosaic Company Foundation invest in partnerships with best-in-class organizations to promote many aspects of conservation, including nutrient stewardship, habitat conservation and watershed restoration. For example, The Mosaic Company Foundation supports The Nature Conservancy’sGreat Rivers Partnershipthrough science-based work with farmers and partners to improve water quality in three key agricultural watersheds in the Upper Mississippi River Basin – Minnesota’s Root River, Iowa’s Boone River and Illinois’ Mackinaw ... more.

15,000 ACRES OF COVER CROPS

CTIC recently received a Grant from EPA’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative that will fund the promotion of cover crops and conservation tillage in the Lake Erie, Lake Huron and Lake Michigan Watersheds. Agricultural producers will be provided with technical, educational and social support which will work together to create strong cover crop and conservation tillage systems that can be sustained after the project ends. Education CTIC will work with partners to host 18 workshops in the three watersheds (Lake Michigan Watershed, Lake Erie Watershed and Lake Huron Watershed) promoting C ... more.

Watershed Academy

The EPA's Watershed Academy provides training opportunities and other resources regarding watershed utilization. Users can participate in training tools, webcasts and others informational sessions. To view publications produced by the Watershed Academy, a list of seminars and other training courses or other information, click here.

Water Quality Trading Workshop Presentations (August 26-27, 2009)

Speaker Presentations Benefits and Obstacles in Water Quality Trading - George Kelly, Environmental Banc & Exchange Ohio's Great Miami River Watershed - Dusty Hall, The Miami Conservancy District Water Quality Credit Training Workshop - Jim Klang, Kieser & Associates Aggregators: Examples and Opportunities - Jamie McCarthy, Kieser & Associates Sauk River Watershed Ecosystem Services Project - Jim Klang, Kieser & Associates Great Miami River Watershed Water Quality Credit Trading Program - Sarah Hippensteel, The M ... more.

Renew Your CTIC Membership ...Or Join!

CTIC brings people together to share insight and data on agricultural conservation. Renew Your CTIC Membership ...Or Join! With the conservation title of the next farm bill in the works, farmers finding ways to use conservation practices to cut costs, and consumer pressure on for growers to farm sustainable, CTIC is at the leading edge of a wide rangeof hot topics. This is a perfect time for you and your company/organization to get involved. CTIC membe ... more.

More Acres Can Also Mean More Conservation

... erodible, damaged cropland into the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) that he could have farmed as a tenant. “There is no reason to farm the land if it’s in such poor condition that you can’t make money,” he said. Schroeder has a handful of CRP contracts of his own, including one that covers approximately 60 acres near his home. To learn more about ways to protect your land from erosion and sediment runoff or to prepare a complete conservation plan for your farm, contact your local USDA-NRCS office. About the Writer: Jason Johnson is a Public Affairs Specialist for USDA-NRCS in Iowa.

Manure Testing

... in a manure management system. This data is used to match application rates to plant nutrient needs and soil test data. How it helps Manure testing and proper application to the land can reduce crop input costs. Preventing over-application of manure to crop fields results in improved water quality. Planning ahead What form of manure do you plan to apply? Have you calibrated your spreader to apply the volume of manure called for according to plant needs and nutrient value of manure? Have you reduced commercial fertilizer use after accounting for nutrients supplied by manure? Will you hire someone or take manure samples yourself? Do you plan to take soil samples to help determine how manure can be used most effectively? Have you allowed sufficient time for the labo ... more.

Manure Storage

Structure that stores manure until conditions are appropriate for field application. How it works The type of manure storage structure you use depends upon your livestock operation, animal waste management system and planned field application. Several options exist including an earthen storage pond, above or below ground tank, pit underneath a confinement facility or a sheltered concrete slab area. Manure can be pumped, scraped and hauled, pushed or flushed into your storage structure. The structure's purpose is to safely contain the manure and keep ... more.

2012 Tour Wrap-Up

... In Action Tour 2013 Stay tuned for more information on next year's Conservation in Action Tour slated to take place at the Indian Creek watershed in Illinois. Thank you to all sponsors of the Conservation in Action Tour. We appreciate your support and value your contributions to make this event a valuable and enjoyable experience. Tour Leader: Evening Social Sponsor: Dinner Sponsor: Expo Exhibitors: & ... more.

Feature Story June 2010

... Williams works as Water Quality Coordinator for the Pesticide and Fertilizer Management section within the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. He pointed to survey results that prove farmers and crop consultants value the NMI program as a useful tool for evaluating nutrient management decisions. Williams commented, “Farmer and crop consultants indicated they increased their knowledge of application rates and timing, nutrient loss potential and impacts on the environment, a better understanding of nutrient contributions, and economic outcomes as a result of their management decisions.” Planning Can Improve Yields and Optimize Inputs Mississippi State Extension offers this definition of nutrient management: “managing crop fertility inputs ... more.

Anaerobic Digesters: A Community Approach

... phosphorus from farms that were already loaded with the nutrient. But the writers of the report were clear - the value of electricity isn’t enough to keep a digester viable. Selling composted solids and selling or utilizing waste heat are also vital to a healthy bottom line. In Oregon, DeVore agrees strongly. “You’d damned well better have a good plan for marketing your solids,” he warns. “You will not realize how fast those separated solids build up if there’s no market for them. There’s no money in electricity, in reality, so we’re drying our separated solids and planning on bagging them.” The Port of Tillamook Bay is working with a retail fertilizer company to build the market for its rich solids. Trucking: the tippin ... more.

Let's Do the Math onCover Crops

Help CTIC pencil out the economic and environmental benefits of cover crops through the "Economic, Agronomic and Environmental Benefits of Cover Crops" project. Below, sign up for our cover crops mailing list or let us know that you are interested in working with us. For more information on the project, check out our project webpage.

John Deere

Safeguarding the environment is nothing new to John Deere - being green is in our blood. We know that responsible resource management is vital to our company, our employees, our customers, our neighbors and our world. John Deere works tirelessly to develop and offer products that are sound and sensible, efficient and effective.

USING COVER CROPS TO FACILITATE THE TRANSITION TO CONTINUOUS NO-TILL

... Continuous no-till (CNT) has been around long enough that there is little doubt among experts of its many advantages. Despite the proven economic and environmental benefits of CNT, some farmers remain hesitant to fully adopt the system. In 2004, the National Crop Residue Management survey indicated that only 22.6 percent of farmers were no-tilling. Attempting CNT without proper technical knowledge may cause a disastrous first year and taint opinions toward the practice. Potential economic risks and yield losses during the first five years also can cause farmers to resist CNT. However, if farmers can maintain a CNT system for three consecutive years, the risks begin to fade. Incorporating cover crops into a CNT rotation can multiply the environmental and economic benefits. Cover crops ... more.

Crop Nutrient Management Facts

... other areas, it improves water infiltration after the soil reaches its maximum water holding capacity. The improved soil structure also reduces compaction enabling plant roots to be stronger, healthier. Cleaner water Soil erosion can be reduced by 90% (compared to intensive tillage). While we have long thought of soil erosion as reducing top soil, we now know it's one of the top ‘pollutants’ in America’s waters. Reducing soil erosion also reduces phosphorous and can reduce pesticide movement. Reductions in phosphorous result in reductions in algae and increase oxygen supplies for fish. Reduces risk of nutrient escape the soil by increasing nutrient availability and uptake by plant roo ... more.

Conservation Tillage

... other areas, it improves water infiltration after the soil reaches its maximum water holding capacity. The improved soil structure also reduces compaction enabling plant roots to be stronger, healthier. Cleaner water Soil erosion can be reduced by 90% (compared to intensive tillage). While we have long thought of soil erosion as reducing top soil, we now know it's one of the top ‘pollutants’ in America’s waters. Reducing soil erosion also reduces phosphorous and can reduce pesticide movement. Reductions in phosphorous result in reductions in algae and increase oxygen supplies for fish. Reduces risk of nutrient escape the soil by increasing nutrient availability and uptake by plant roots. Convert ... more.

Partners Contribution June 2010

... more conservation practices on the ground. The beauty of conservation districts is that they exist in virtually every county and community in the nation, where they work on meaningful, landscape-scale projects that produce verifiable improvements in environmental quality. Conservation districts’ work results in clean air, clean water, healthy habitat and productive soil. As you well know, it’s an exciting time for conservation in this country. Projects abound, and there is significant commitment from individual landowners, communities, lawmakers and funders to make improvements to our natural resources. We still have our challenges, but the time is right to make significant progress as stewards of the land. While continuing to fill many of our traditional roles, NACD ... more.

Using Cover Crops to Facilitate the Transition to Continuous No-Till

... producers and four in Ohio — are transitioning a portion of their fields to continuous no-till, while incorporating cover crops into their rotation. Crop consultants provide technical and social support during the transition. Consultants meet regularly with their partner-farmers, assisting with equipment adjustments, timing, seed selection and other related decisions. “We know that the first five years of a no-till system can be the most challenging,” says Angie Williams, CTIC Project Director. “Using a cover crop, however, can make that transition easier and reveal the benefits of the system.” This project also offers educational and social opportunities — workshops, farmer network meetings and online communities — so that particip ... more.

Leading the way

... mines existing farmland to minimize habitat disturbance. However, if mining must be conducted in areas that may disturb native species, Mosaic’s team of biologists and geologists step into action, says Ron Olson, Mosaic research and development manager. “These teams have a very loving respect for the living creatures on our properties,” Olson says. “We want to know what they are and where they are. We will then relocate the species and continue building their population. And, when we are done mining, we will move those members of the species back onto their land.” Take, for example, the “friendliest bird in the field,” the Florida Scrub-jay. Although this highly social bird was listed as a threatened species by the U.S. Fish and W ... more.

CTIC Conservation in Action Tour Draws 130+ to Chesapeake Bay

... deep roots in the community and the eyes of Washington—and the world—focused on the Bay’s recovery, the farmers and fishermen of Maryland’s Eastern Shore are pushing conservation into a new era. Next year’s Conservation in Action Tour—CTIC’s 12th annual—will be held in the Des Moines area. Watch www.ctic.org/CIATours for details so you can mark your calendar and join us! Conservation in Action Tour participants fill the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center. Conservation in Action Tours provide a close-up look at BMPs. Alex Echols of Ecosystem Services Exchange describes controlled drainage management systems.

BUILDING INNOVATIVE INDUSTRY-PRODUCER PARTNERSHIPS TO REDUCE HYPOXIA IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

... on: developing consistent messages about nutrient management needs and practices in southeastern Minnesota, identifying and bringing the tools/ practices necessary for improving nutrient management, and obtaining funding to support direct technical assistance to help farmer understand, adopt and maintain nutrient management practices. Working in 14 counties within the Wabash Watershed (two in western Ohio and 12 in eastern Indiana), CTIC has facilitated the formation of a watershed stakeholder group to identify needs for nutrient management within the watershed, identify existing programs and assistance for meeting nutrient management needs, determine what additional tools are needed for success, and search for ptential funding sources. The project's web site, http:www.cti ... more.

INTRODUCTION TO WIIN

Take a tour of the new WIIN, an innovative website for watershed project managers in the Mississippi River Basin. The Great Rivers & Upstream Heroes Watershed Implementation & Innovation Network (WIIN) is an online resource for sharing detailed information about watershed projects throughout the Basin, including data and lessons learned.

Great Lakes Cover Crop Initiative Watershed Coordinators

A highly qualified crop consultant (watershed coordinator) has been identified in each watershed to provide one on one technical support to the producers who participate in this program. These people will meet with producers and help them make important decisions to ensure a successful transition to using a cover crop and conservation tillage system. Lake Michigan Coordina ... more.

A Watershed Approach to Urban Runoff: Handbook for Decisionmakers Guide

A Watershed Approach to Urban Runoff: Handbook for Decisionmakers Guide The watershed management approach to assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating, with an overview of assessment and management tools.This text provides detailed insights into structural and non-structural best management practices and sample site plans. Produced by the Terrene Institute in conjunction with EPA Region 5 (1996, 1 ... more.

Swine Manure Testing Project

The Upper Wabash Nutrient Management Coalition is working with the Grand Lake/Wabash Watershed Alliance (GLWWA) to collect data on swine manure nutrient content. The GLWWA’s watershed action plan, endorsed by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, includes objectives related to agriculture. Many focus on reducing nutrient loading to streams. Nutrient loads can be reduced by addressing erosion problems and using best management prac ... more.

Watershed Impovement Committee

The Watershed Improvement Committee operates the Middle Kaskaskia Watershed project. They are a world-leading group known for their research in NPS (Non-point Source Pollution).

Increasing Farmer Involvement in Watershed Projects: Indian Creek Watershed

WIIN Webinar on how to increase interaction with and involvement of producers in watershed project design and implementation. Click to get file.

What's New at CTIC

... and its partners lead projects at the local, regional, and national level to address agriculture’s pressing conservation needs. Each project includes public and private sector partners, shares information about new technology and tools, and promotes agricultural systems that are both economically viable and environmentally beneficial. Read more » Do YouKnow OpTIS? The Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) has been developed by Applied GeoSolutions and CTIC as a method for the automated use of remote sensing (satellite-based) data to monitor conservation practices in agricultural systems, including various forms of reduced tillage and the planting of winter cover crops. Read more »

2013 Tour Wrap-Up

... gallery and Facebook page. READ MORE about the tour stops, speakers and topics. As part of our tour preview, we showcased the farms highlighted during the tour. Check out the video below! 2013 TOUR SPONSORS Thank you to all sponsors of the 2013 Conservation in Action Tour. We appreciate your support and value your contributions. Tour Leader: Social Sponsor: Dinner Sponsor: Lunch Sponsor: Lunch c ... more.

Make it your New Year's resolution to get involved at CTIC

Whether it's collaborating on a project, joining a committee or just starting a conversation about your own conservation goals, we want to hear from you. Contact our Executive Director Chad Watts at watts@ctic.org or by calling 765-494-9555. Make sure you check us out onFacebookandTwitter!We look forward to working with you this year.

Make it your New Year's resolution to get involved at CTIC

Whether it's collaborating on a project, joining a committee or just starting a conversation about your own conservation goals, we want to hear from you. Contact our Executive Director Chad Watts at watts@ctic.org or by calling 765-494-9555. Make sure you check us out on Facebook and Twitter! We look forward to working with you this year.

Privacy Policy and Terms of Use

... visitors to be aware when they leave our site and to read the privacy statements of each and every web site that collects personally identifiable information. This privacy statement applies solely to information collected by this web site. Security This web site takes every precaution to protect our visitors’ information. When visitors submit sensitive information via the web site, your information is protected both online and off-line. All sensitive registration/order information (such as credit card number) is encrypted and protected with the best encryption software in the industry (SSL). While on a secure page, such as our order form, the lock icon on the bottom of web browsers such as Netscape Navigator and Microsoft Internet Explorer becomes locked, as opposed to unlock ... more.

TAKE THE 2016 COVER CROP SURVEY

Click here to take the survey online for a chance to win a $100 gift card! Whether you plant them now, used to plant them or never tried… your insight is important. Your opinions will help guide policy, research and education on cover crops nationwide..

CTIC BOARD MEETING JAN. 30

... Board meeting begins 12 p.m. - Lunch 1 p.m. - Board meeting resumes 4 p.m. - Board meeting adjourns Detailed agenda coming soon. This meeting is in conjunction with the National Association of Conservation Districts annual meeting. For more information, please click here. Hotel Information: Please note there are two Marriott hotels in San Antonio; be sure to make your reservation at the Rivercenter: Marriott Rivercenter Hotel 101 Bowie Street San Antonio, TX 78205 210-223-1000 The room rate for a single/double room is $179 per night. This rate may be available three days prior to and after NACD's meeting based solely upon the hotel's availability. Guestroom tax in San Antonio, TX is currently 16.75 percent. A dedicated website is n ... more.

Air Management Practices Tool - Iowa State University Extension

The purpose of this Air Management Practices Assessment Tool is to guide you through a process of determining which mitigation practices are best suited to your operation and your objectives. The website is organized into four air emissions of interest: dust (particulates), odor, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide. Within each gas or emittent, sources of emission are categorized by housing, manure storage, or land application.

Pasture Planting

... pasture or a steep, eroding cropland field. How it helps Heavy grass cover slows water flow, reducing soil erosion. Good pastures protect water quality by filtering runoff water and increasing infiltration. Lush pastures give cover and habitat for wildlife. As plants recycle and roots die, organic matter in the soil is improved. Planning ahead Are selected species suited to your soil types? Have you chosen species that will help you reduce the use of pesticides and herbicides? Have you chosen species that will meet the needs of your livestock? Tech notes Do not mix warm and cool season grasses in the same pasture. Selected grass and legumes should be compatible with the planned management. When only two grass species are selected, they should make up equa ... more.

Cover Crop Workshops

... topics vary from workshop to workshop, but are all very similar programs. Specifics for each workshop and links for online registration can be found below. Online registration is $20 or $30 at the door. The registration feel will cover morning snacks, facility rental and lunch. Click here to download a brochure containing information about the workshops. You may return the brochure with your registration information if you prefer to send your registration via mail. Workshop Details Lake Erie March 10, 2011 (Bowling Green, Ohio) Wood County Fairgrounds, Junior Fair Building 13800 West Poe Road Bowling Green, OH 43402 Get Directions View the Agenda with Speakers Register Here February 15, 2011 ... more.

Nutrients in Our Environment - Past, Present, and Beyond (February 18, 2010)

... can be managed efficiently with the latest techniques and technologies, to avoid the potential financial and environmental risks of nitrogen and phosphorus reaching surface and ground water. Learn about research developments and new tools for improving on-farm nutrient efficiency. Contact:brian.c.williams@state.mn.us Please register by calling 651-201-6141. Your fee of $10 at the door will cover your refreshments and lunch. Conference Presentations Speaker Contact Information and Biographies News Release Download Conference Brochure Agenda Poster Booth Abstracts Corporate Sponsor:

Crop Rotation - Core 4

... diseases. Grass and legumes in a rotation protect water quality by preventing excess nutrients or chemicals from entering water supplies. Meadow or small grains cut soil erosion dramatically. Crop rotations add diversity to an operation. Planning ahead Do you have use for other crops? Cover crops may help in crop rotation. Tech notes Crops must be suited to your soils. Design crop rotations to meet the residue needs of your crop residue management plans. Rotations that include small grains or meadow provide better erosion control. Small grains and meadow can always be used to replace any row crop or low residue crop to gain better erosion control. Corn (grains) can always be used to replace soybeans or any other low residue crop in the rotati ... more.

Fast vs. Fuel - The New No-Till Debate

... Gillespie points out. On a quarter-section, the three-trip conventional tillage program represents $17.90 per acre in costs and 37 hours of work. Outfitting that same tractor with a 90-foot spray boom and making a burndown pass for a no-till program prepares the seedbed in just two hours for $6.47 per acre. Sure, a $5 or $6 bushel of corn can help eat up those fuel costs, he acknowledges. But preparing a field in two hours instead of two long days, and planting a week or two earlier, can really tip the scales in favor of no-till. That's if the long-term benefits of healthier soil, better drainage, and timelier planting haven't sold you. For more information… Check out Dan Gillespie's comparison of three-pass, two-pass and no-ti ... more.

Smarter Fertilizer Use Yields Environmental Benefits

... Program, created by the 2008 Farm Bill, offers incentive payments to growers who adopt conservation-focused nutrient-management plans. Depending on farm location, Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) and other programs also provide support for these practices, including the use of slow- and controlled-release fertilizer products. To learn more about programs available in your area, contact your local Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) center. The demand for food, fuel and fiber will continue to grow unabated. So, too, will pressures to protect the environment. Balancing these competing demands will require creative conservation from agriculture, and smart nutrient use will be critical to our success. For more information on Agrium, visit www.a ... more.

A Look Back and a Glimpse into 2009

... it doesn't seem possible, we are nearing the end of another year. Soon we are giving thanks for the good things in our lives and making plans for new accomplishments and adventures for the year ahead. CTIC is thankful for each of our members and partners across the country. Thanks to your support, we have grown in 2008 and added to our list of successes. We welcomed 52 new members this year. We've added new member benefits this year, too, including the Conservation In Action Tour, a summer event that brought together nearly 100 members and partners to see first-hand how producers are making conservation profitable and sustainable. I hope you all will join us in 2009 for the To ... more.

Field Border

... lanes around the field. How it helps Vegetative cover reduces sheet and rill erosion by slowing water flow. Vegetation filters runoff to improve water quality. Grass and legume strips may be harvested in some cases and are easier to turn on than end rows. Vegetation provides cover and habitat for small birds and animals. Planning ahead Will the width be wide enough to turn your equipment? Can that land qualify for set aside? Tech notes Borders must be at least 16 feet wide, or wide enough for your equipment. * Borders need to be seeded or left in place when a meadow field is plowed. Seed with perennial grasses, legumes or a mixture of the two. Seed cool season grasses between March 1 and May 15 or during late summer seeding period, August 1 to September ... more.

Crop Residue Management

... from rain and wind until plants can produce a protective canopy. How it helps Ground cover prevents soil erosion and protects water quality. Residue improves soil tilth and adds organic matter to the soil as it decomposes. Fewer trips and less tillage reduces soil compaction. Time, energy and labor savings are possible with fewer tillage trips. Planning ahead Will your crop produce enough residue? Is crop residue management part of a planned system of conservation measures? Do you have the needed equipment? Tech notes Planning for residue cover begins at harvest. Ensure ample residues are spread evenly over the field by the combine. Reduce the number of unnecessary tillage passes. Every tillage pass buries more crop residue. Use straight ... more.

Gold Corporate Benefits

GOLD CORPORATE BENEFITS * Recognition in three issues of Partners magazine * 10% discount on CTIC products during your annual membership term * Special recognition at a CTIC Board of Directors meeting * Two gift memberships at the Individual Silver level * Ad space in two issues of Partners magazine ($600 value) * Recognition at two CTIC event during your annual membership term * Two complimentary registrations to CTIC’s Conservation In Action Tour * Recognition on CTIC’s ... more.

Integrated Manure Management: Good Neighbors, Good Business

... (N) they excrete. Similarly, adding the amino acid phytase to the ration helps pigs utilize the most common form of phosphorus (P) in their feed. That boosts the value of their ration and reduces the amount of (P) that has to be managed later in manure. Well-balanced rations can create well-balanced manure, says Beard. “You can get to the place where nitrogen might not be your limiting factor,” he notes. “You’re much more into balance of a typical corn/soybean rotation when you reduce the nitrogen.” Synthetic amino acids balance the ration more precisely than metering bulk feed ingredients in or out of the mix, Beard explains, adding that the benefits extend to the neighbors, too. “When you use synthetic amino acids in orde ... more.

CTIC Web Site Terms of Use

... visitors to be aware when they leave our site and to read the privacy statements of each and every web site that collects personally identifiable information. This privacy statement applies solely to information collected by this web site. Security This web site takes every precaution to protect our visitors’ information. When visitors submit sensitive information via the web site, your information is protected both online and off-line. All sensitive registration/order information (such as credit card number) is encrypted and protected with the best encryption software in the industry (SSL). While on a secure page, such as our order form, the lock icon on the bottom of web browsers such as Netscape Navigator and Microsoft Internet Explorer becomes locked, as opposed to unlocke ... more.

2018 Membership Drive

... has never been a better time to join CTIC. We’ve got great programs in the field and a clearinghouse full of information on everything from selecting the right cover crops to organizing watershed-wide conservation projects. In addition to the information below, a membership application is now available online at https://www.ctic.org/Membership/Join Here you will be able to pay your membership dues online with a credit card (available for memberships up to $2,000) request an invoice, or provide us with special billing instructions. You can find out even more about what CTIC has to offer atwww.ctic.org Should you have any questions, feel free to contact Crystal Hatfield at hatfield@ctic.org We hope to pull up a seat at the table for you in 2019! Sincerely, ... more.

…and looking forward to 2018!

We’re excited to continue supporting conservation agriculture in 2018 with your help. Here is what we are looking forward to (so far): Launching a brand new website and a modified logo. Our new website will have a sleek, fresh new look and retrieving information about conservation agriculture will be easier than ever. Our 2018 Conservation in Action Tour will be held in the Maryland/Washington D.C. area this summer. Plans are already underway, and we’re thrilled ... more.

...and looking forward to 2018!

We’re excited to continue supporting conservation agriculture in 2018 with your help. Here is what we are looking forward to (so far): Launching a brand new website and a modified logo. Our new website will have a sleek, fresh new look and retrieving information about conservation agriculture will be easier than ever. Our 2018 Conservation in Action Tour will be held in the Maryland/Washington D.C. area this summer. Plans are already underway, and we’re thrille ... more.

INDIAN CREEK WATERSHED PROJECT

Mark your calendars for the annual Indian Creek Summer Tour on July 16. Click here to download the tour flyer.

30th Anniversary Member Spotlight

... our members, CTIC has grown over the last three decades, expanded our focus, increased and diversified our partners and worked with thousands of people across the country to advance conservation. Throughout March, we recognize corporate member The Mosiac Company, institutional member The Fertilizer Insititute and individual member Joe Glassmeyer. Thanks for your membership! CORPORATE CTIC recognizes Gold Corporate Member, The Mosaic Company, in our member spotlight. The Mosaic Company sponsors our 30th Anniversary, the Indian Creek Watershed Project and serving as Tour Leader sponsor for the Conservation In Action Tour for the second year in a row. The Mosaic Company is the worl ... more.

CTIC News

... Bill Herz, The Fertilizer Institute; Bill Kuckuck, CropLife America; Ron Olson, The Mosaic Company; Jerry Snodgrass, National Association of Conservation Districts; Rod Snyder, National Corn Growers Association; John Redding, National Association of Conservation Districts; and Stephen Timmons, Case IH. Make plans to attend the CTIC Conservation In Action Tour 2010 Mark your calendar for the CTIC Conservation In Action Tour 2010, set for Aug. 3 in Williamsburg-Richmond, Va. This fourth-annual conservation tour will highlight farms and farmers of east central Virginia. The producers have built successful, profitable farming operations with conservation measures, and they provide their community with valuable ecosystem services. With producers, ag advisors, conservatio ... more.

Water Quality Monitoring Program

... or tile outlets through outreach and feedback event Determine the impacts of spring application and fall application of nitrogen on nutrient use efficiency on field site Three monitoring stations collect tile water at a Livingston County, IL farm field. These objectives help reach the ultimate goal of improving yields and/or reducing N loading into the Vermilion River Watershed as a result of implementing a better N management system. Project results will include water quality monitoring data associated with NUE in-field calculations as well as demonstrations of the usability of tile outlet monitoring by producers, the cost effectiveness of these monitoring solutions for measuring nutrient loss and the impact of associated outreach efforts to increase ado ... more.

Bioenergy Productions

Argonne National Laboratory found a home for its biomass test site on the Ray Popejoy farm in the Indian Creek watershed. Argonne is exploring the potential for farmers to employ underused or marginal land to produce crops for biomass energy. Factors studied include economic potential and water quality benefits. As this project moves forward, funding from the Department of Energy is expected to support the scientific investigation and field study. Agribusiness will assist with identifying potential supply ... more.

Sustainable Supply Chains

... footprint of their raw materials, stakeholders throughout the agri-food supply chain are working diligently to quantify and benchmark sustainability. CTIC is a partner in several initiatives to bring together participants from various points in the supply chain to develop metrics and processes that provide useful insight and fit into real-world, on-farm management systems. Big Pine Watershed Water Quality Metric Trial CTIC is assisting Field to Market with a small-scale pilot of an improved water quality metric for Field to Market's FieldPrint Calculator. This effort will leverage relationships developed through the Big Pine Watershed project to collect farm management data and farmer feedback on the new metric. Supporting Supply Chain Sustainability CTIC recently began a ne ... more.

Build Coalitions

CTIClinks private businesses, non-profit organizations, associations, and local, state, regional, and federal government agencies to address their common conservation agriculture issues. Our coalition-led initiatives range from small watershed projects to national events and conferences. With strength, wisdom, and knowledge in numbers, CTIC’s coalitions work to disseminate information on new technologies and tools, to ensure conservation agriculture works on the ground. The Conservation Agriculture Systems Alliance (CASA)unites voluntary producer organizations across North America that share similar missions and goals, encounter similar challenges and struggle with all too common problems. The CA ... more.

Cover crop impacts on watershed hydrology.

Cover crops alter many aspects of the hydrologic cycle. <span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%;Calibri" ,"sans-serif";times="" new="" roman";times="" roman";"="">Cover crop impacts on watershed hydrology.

THREE POSITIONS OPEN AT CTIC

... position of Project Director please click here. COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR The CTIC Communications Director will develop, deliver and monitor programs, messages and materials to promote conservation agriculture. He/she will communicate regularly with, among others, federal, state and local government agencies; agriculture industry, media and associations; conservation groups and watershed partnerships. This position will also be responsible for grant-funded projects that involve technology transfer, publications, information dissemination, media relations or other communication-related outcomes. For more information about the position of Project Director please click here. COMMUNICATIONS INTERN The CTIC Communications Intern will assist CTIC staff in creating comm ... more.

Watershed Networking Sessions (May 2009)

Integrating Watershed Planning and Implementation at the Local Level Click on the links below to see the presentations from the May Networking Sessions: Presentation Part 1 ... more.

GREAT LAKES COVER CROP INITIATIVE 2012 WORKSHOPS

Date Location Contact February 21 Ogemaw County Ogemaw Co MSU Extension Office Rifle River Watershed West Branch, MI Paul Gross 989-772-0911x302 grossp@msu.edu March 15 Allegan County Trestle Stop Restaurant Macatawa watershed Hamilton, MI Christina Currell 231-745-2732 curellc@msu.edu ... more.

NOW HIRING - COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR

... Chair, officers, and other board members. Regularly in contact with federal, state and local government agencies; agriculture industry, media and associations; conservation groups and watershed partnerships and other groups funding or participating in projects administered by CTIC. Qualifications Journalism or communications degree; or relative, adequate experience Knowledge of agriculture and conservation issues Ability to communicate effectively with a wide range of audiences Ability to manage multiple projects simultaneously and thrive in fast-paced environment Organizational and time management skills Proficiency in Microsoft Office 2010 and Adobe Design Premium CS4 Suite Familiarity with web site development and conte ... more.

Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Webinars

... view the agenda and topics to be discussed, click here. Sponsored by Conservation Technology Information Center, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Tetra Tech November 9th: Overview of Centralized and Decentralized Treatment Issues Summary of Centralized/Decentralized Treatment Approaches Water and Wastewater Resource Management ConsiderationsTMDLs, Watershed Planning, Antidegradation, and Wastewater Wastewater Capacity Development and Cost Issues View the November 9th presentation, Barry Tonning. Questions & Answers Links Mentioned in the Presentation: Rocky Mountain Institute Cost Benefit Analysis of Wastewater Options Guidance for Federal Land Management in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed U ... more.

CIA Tour Promo 2010

... of natural resources go hand in hand; •A visit to the Archer Ruffin farm, to learn about carbon markets and profitable conservation, and to engage in a farmer panel focused on conservation; •Lunch at the Shirley Plantation, the oldest family-owned business in North America, featuring presentations about the Chesapeake Bay watershed; •A stop at Carter farm to learn about successful no-till cotton production in cool soil temperatures; The Shirley Plantation, Charles City, Virginia. Photo Courtesy of Charles Carter. •A visit to the Paul Davis farm to take part in a series of presentations on how agriculture will play a significant role in re ... more.

Click for the Grand Lake St. Mary’s/Wabash Watershed Action Plan.

Click for the Grand Lake St. Mary’s/Wabash Watershed Action Plan.

Water Quality Trading Workshop Presentations (July 8-9, 2009)

Water Quality Credit Trading Workshop July 8-9, 2009 Sherrodsville, Ohio Speaker Presentations: Ohio's Water Quality Trading Rules - Gary Stuhlfauth, Ohio EPA Ohio's Great Miami River Watershed - Dusty Hall, The Miami Conservancy District Great Miami River Watershed Water Quality Credit Trading Program - Sarah Hippensteel Community-Based Water Quality Trading: The Alpine Water Quality Trading Plan - Dr. Richard Moore, The Ohio State University Water Quality Credit Trading Workshop - Jim Klang, Kieser & Associates WQT Workshop Role-playing Exercise - Jim Klang, Ki ... more.

What is a Watershed

What is a watershed video

Everyone Impacts a Watershed

Everyone Impacts a Watershed

Member Benefits

Join us at the basic membership level that fits you best – Individual, Institutional or Corporate. For additional benefits and recognition, increase your contribution. Each level includes additionalbenefits through Gold, Silver and Bronze. All CTIC members benefit from: One-year subscription to Conservation Partners and Member Mail e-newsletters Free access to higher-resolution data from the OpTIS Operational Tillage Information System database Recognition on CTIC’s web page Please identify which category applies to y ... more.

2010 Tour Wrap-Up

... about the most valuable part of the Tour... “Today’s tour has been the highlight of my professional training for this year! I not only gained very useful CEU’s in Soil and Water Management…I got to network with people I have not be introduced to before….this was a great experience.” "We utilize cover crops on our farm knowing how important they are. I learned so much more today and look forward to putting it into practice. THANK YOU!" "I thought this year’s tour was focused much more on solutions than merely on practices and that was GREAT!" "Meeting new friends in our business and seeing beautiful parts of the country. Great to see people out ... more.

2011 Tour Wrap-Up

CTIC welcomed participants from Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Ontario, South Dakota, Washington D.C., and Wisconsin. And more than 15 agribusinesses shared their knowledge, expertise and product information. Rex Martin, CTIC board chair and Syngenta Crop Protection head of industry affairs, shares his thoughts. “This tour really shows the value of CTIC – bringing together a diverse group of people to learn about, talk about and explore new opportunities for conservation in agriculture. Excellent farms, important dialogue and ... more.

Join the conservation community!

CTIC members play a critical role when it comes to spreading and championing the message of conservation agriculture. Keep growing and learning with us by renewing your CTIC membership!To renew, please email Crystal Hatfield at hatfield@ctic.org or call 765-494-9555.

Don't forget to renew your membership

Have you checked your mailbox for CTIC’s annual membership renewal notice? Renewing your membership helps us continue to make a difference in conservation agriculture and helps us continue to grow our organization. CTIC members play a critical role in spreading the message about how conservation practices can help improve soil and water quality, boost profitability and more. We couldn’t do it without yo ... more.

Happy New Year from your friends at CTIC!

Here are some updates and reminders as the new year gets underway.

What's Happening at CTIC?

2018 Conservation in Action Tour dates and location Mark your calendars! We are thrilled to announce that our 11th annual Conservation in Action Tour will take place on July 11 and 12 near the beautiful Chesapeake Bay in the Maryland and Washington D.C. area. More information will be announced as it is finalized in the coming months. We're excited to continue bringing together people from across the country with different perspectives on conservation ag ... more.

Happy New Year from your friends at CTIC!

Here are some updates and reminders as the new year gets underway.

Thank you sponsors

... Social John Deere Diamond Bayer CropScience Monsanto Platinum Dow AgroSciences Syngenta The Fertilizer Institute Click hereto see a complete list of 2017 Tour sponsors. Why attend the Tour? This is one of the most well-organized multi-stop tours I've ever been on - I'm hoping to take some of your great ideas and implement them. ~Anonymous, 2016 Tour Participant I loved every second of the tour. Networking and meeting new people, experiencing the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA), learning new facts and being inspired by the passion of the EAA researchers and growers all contributed to making the tour an incredible experience. I am so glad I was able to attend. I am already planning f ... more.

Thank you sponsors

... Social John Deere Diamond Bayer CropScience Monsanto Platinum Dow AgroSciences Syngenta The Fertilizer Institute Click hereto see a complete list of 2017 Tour sponsors. Why attend the Tour? This is one of the most well-organized multi-stop tours I've ever been on - I'm hoping to take some of your great ideas and implement them. ~Anonymous, 2016 Tour Participant I loved every second of the tour. Networking and meeting new people, experiencing the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA), learning new facts and being inspired by the passion of the EAA researchers and growers all contributed to making the tour an incredible experience. I am so glad I was able to attend. I am already planning f ... more.

Sponsorship Details

Join Us in Celebrating Our 10th Conservation in Action Tour! Now is the time to sign on as a sponsor of CTIC's 2017 Conservation in Action Tour and position your company as a leader in conservation farming. Contact Chad Watts atwatts@ctic.orgor call 765-494-9555 for sponsorship details.(Click on the chart below to download a sponsorship flyer.) Tour sponsors receive: National recognition and exposure; Interaction with 200 tour participants, including policy makers, government agency representatives, producers ... more.

HOTEL DEADLINE FOR TOUR IS FRIDAY, JULY 22

Book your hotel room today for the Conservation in Action Tour! Deadline is Friday, July 22. Click here for direct link to hotel or here to visit travel section on the tour website.

FACILITATING CONSERVATION FARMING PRACTICES AND ENHANCING ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY WITH AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY

... The web site also include audio interviews, an executive summary highlighting the information in the publication and the ability to download the full publication. For More Information For more information, contact Tammy Taylor at 765-494-1814 or taylor@ctic.org. Get Involved Distribute copies of the free publication and executive summary to your colleagues and constituents Contact CTIC for printed copes or download from www.ctic.org/BiotechSustainability.

TAKE CTIC'S NEW SURVEYS ON CROPPING DECISIONS

Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) and the Howard G. Buffett Foundation want to learn more about producer cropping decisions. We invite producers to spend a few minutes answering two short surveys about their agricultural operations. Participants could win one of several prizes, including two $100 gift cards. You can double your chances of winning by completing both surveys. Please click here to take Cropping Decisions Survey #1 Please click here to take Cropping Decisions Survey #2 The answers provided in these surveys are held strictly confidential and used only in combination with all others for industry percents and averages. Thank you for participating in these surveys. ... more.

Take our SARE/CTIC Cover Crop Survey

Make a difference! Take our SARE/CTIC Cover Crop Survey and share your thoughts on cover crops. You’ll help guide cover crop research, and be eligible for a $100 gift card drawing!

Corporate Benefits

Recognition in three issues of Partners magazine 10% discount on CTIC products during your annual membership term Special recognition at a CTIC Board of Directors meeting

Conservation Agriculture Carbon Offset Consultation - The Results

... provides background and supporting information about the importance of soil carbon sequestration in conservation agriculture. It is designed to accompany the one-pager and provide additional information to the reader. What You Can Do Share both documents with people who can help us put conservation agriculture into action to help address greenhouse gas emissions. Send it to your local, regional and national political leaders with a personal note urging them to get more information and to take action. Request personal meetings with decision makers and review the documents with them. Contact CTIC to view the presentations delivered during the Consultationand complete proceedings. Organized by: Conservation Technology Information Center ... more.

CTIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING

... 31 - Feb. 1, 2012 Las Vegas, NV Tuesday (Jan. 31) -- 12:00 - 5:00 pm Room: Brera 4, Third Level (Mezzanine) Wednesday (Feb. 1) -- 8:00 am - 12:00 pm Room: Brera 2, Third Level Hotel Information: The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas 3708 Las Vegas Blvd. South Las Vegas, NV 89109 702-698-7000 Deadline to reserve rooms is Jan. 9, 2012. To reserve your room online please click here.

Contour Buffer Strip

... reducing siltation and filtering nutrients and chemicals from runoff, grass strips improve water quality. Planning ahead Have you decided whether you want parallel crop strips or parallel buffer strips? Are other conservation measures such as crop residue management installed or planned to help reduce siltation of grass strips? Will planned acres in row crops meet your production objectives? Tech notes Buffer strips must be at least 15 feet wide. * Either crop strips or grass strips may be parallel. Parallel crop strips are easier to farm with no point rows, but that results in less of the slope in row crops. Grass buffer strips commonly make up 20% to 30% of the slope. * Maintenance Control weeds and brush in grass filter strips. ... more.

Conservation In Action Tour 2011 A Success

CTIC welcomed participants from Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Ontario, South Dakota, Washington D.C., and Wisconsin. And more than 15 agribusinesses shared their knowledge, expertise and product information. Rex Martin, CTIC board chair and Syngenta Crop Protection head of industry affairs, shares his thoughts. “This tour really shows the value of CTIC – bringing together a diverse group of people to learn about, talk about and explore new opportunities for conservation in agriculture. Excellent farms, important dialogue and ... more.

AQUATIC RESOURCES WORKSHOPS

... to conduct a wetlands training workshop in October 2010 and a lakes workshop for the first week of November. For More Information Contact Tammy Taylor at Tel: 765-494-1814 or Email: taylor@ctic.org. Get Involved Host a meeting for leaders of state and tribal programs for wetlands, lakes, coastal, rivers and streams at a research center or other facility in your area.

Winter 2011 CTIC Board of Directors

The Winter 2011 CTIC Board of Directors meeting will take place Feb. 2, 2011, at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel and Convention Center in Nashville, Tenn. During this meeting, CTIC will elect Directors and Officers to the CTIC Board of Directors. All paid CTIC members are encouraged to vote, however, you must be present at the meeting to cast your ballot. CTIC’s Winter meeting is held in conjunction with the NACD Annual Meeting, which will be held Jan. 30 – Feb. 2 at Opryland. For more information, click here.

Understanding Conservation Tillage Systems Resources

... assists producers and their advisors in selecting a conservation tillage system for corn in a corn-soybean rotation. Conservation Tillage Series provides information on crop rotation, weed management, soil compaction, nutrient management, cover crops and economic statistics. NO-TILL Energy Estimator for Tillage estimates diesel fuel use and costs in production of your area’s key crops and compares the potential energy savings of conventional tillage and alternative tillage systems. 60 Ways Farmers Can Protect Surface Water provides ideas on how producers can protect water quality without sacrificing production. NUTRIENT EFFICIENCY 4R Nutrient Stewardship emphasizes four central components: applying the right fertilizer source at th ... more.

Conservation In Action Tour 2010 "Best Tour Yet"

... about the most valuable part of the Tour... “Today’s tour has been the highlight of my professional training for this year! I not only gained very useful CEU’s in Soil and Water Management…I got to network with people I have not be introduced to before….this was a great experience.” "We utilize cover crops on our farm knowing how important they are. I learned so much more today and look forward to putting it into practice. THANK YOU!" "I thought this year’s tour was focused much more on solutions than merely on practices and that was GREAT!" "Meeting new friends in our business and seeing beautiful parts of the country. Great to see people out ... more.

JOIN CTIC

... are CTIC's strength. With our solid, active and dedicated membership, we've demonstrated the value of public/private partnerships, and we've proven that collaboration works. Join our national public/private partnership at the basic membership level that fits you best –
Individual, Institutional or Corporate. For additional benefits and recognition, increase your contribution to support the important work of CTIC. Each membership category includes additional giving levels of Gold, Silver and Bronze. See our Membership Brochure for detailed information about each membership level.

 JOIN TODAY! Download a Membership Form and send it back to CTIC.

Conservation Tillage Photos and Graphics

... small grain seeds like wheat and rye. Farmers also use them to plant soybeans and take advantage of the (ultra narrow) 7.5-inch rows to provide natural weed protection and higher yielding crops. 1000 x 671 pixels Size: 329k Source: Farm Journal The farmer on the lead tractor is mowing cotton stalks following harvest while another farmer follows him with a type of planter known as a drill. The drill is planting rye grass into the cotton stalks and other crop residues that have been left from past harvests. These crop residues slowly decompose, helping to protect and build the soil in the field while helping nourish the newly planted seeds. 1000 x 701 pixels Size: 474k Source: CTIC/Mitchell Pretty, green cotton plants emerge from a field that ... more.

A Dozen Do's for Successful No Till Corn Following Soybeans

Equip Your Combine to Chop and Evenly Spread Residue..more

Cover Crop Workshop (August 25, 2009)

... from the meeting are below: Cover Crops, No-till, and Soil Quality, Dan Towery Indiana Specific Niches, Dave Robison You have heard about the benefits of cover crops, now learn how to make them work! Spend the day with an all star cast of speakers from Purdue University, NRCS, Michigan State University, CISCO seeds and Ag Conservation Solutions and learn how to use cover crops on your operation. The Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) has partnered with Madison County SWCD, Purdue University, NRCS, Michigan State University, the Midwest Cover Crops Council , CISCO seeds and Ag Conservation Solutions to bring you a full day workshop on How to Use Cover Crops. First, you will learn about the economic and environmental benefits of using cover crops. As t ... more.

Success Story June 2010

... cost-share rates). Limited Resource Producers, Beginning Farmers, Tribal Farmers and Socially Disadvantaged Producers are eligible for a higher payment rate. For example, these farmers would receive $108.19 per acre/year through EQIP to introduce winter hardy cereals to their operation. For more information about establishing, managing, and overall benefits of cover crops, visit your local NRCS office, or find “Cover Crops: A guide for Iowa Producers” online at www.ia.nrcs.usda.gov/news/brochures/publications.html. About the Writer: Jason Johnson is the Public Affairs Specialist with USDA-NRCS in Des Moines, IA

Livestock Waste Management June 2010

... Renewable Energy Dave Dunn, Central Vermont Public Service “Cow Power Program” teams up with Dr. Paul Patterson, Professor of Poultry Science, Penn State Department of Poultry Science to present exciting developments on-farm for innovations in waste-to-energy generation and linking farmers to the grid. What’s ahead for Manure du jour? Mark your calendar for this upcoming Manure du jour topic (NOTE: Participation in the live session will require a free Friends of Penn State digital identity in advance of the session. Recordings can be viewed at anytime at the Penn State Agriculture and Environment.) Emerging Policy Issues for Pesticide Use on the Farm Thursday, July 1, 2010, 1:30 to 2:30 PM. John Becker, P ... more.

Date and Location Set for 2009 Conservation in Action Tour

... Set for 2009 Conservation in Action Tour By Rachel Doctor The 2008 Conservation in Action Tour was a great success. Nearly 100 members and partners attended to see the latest conservation practices of five farms in central Indiana. The photos below show highlights of the tour. We hope you will join us again in 2009. Mark your calendars for July 29, where the tour will feature stops in western Illinois! An engrossed group of Conservation In Action Tour participants listens to a discussion at one of the Beck's Hybrids seed company's greenhouses. Photo Courtesy of Purity Mason Side-by-side demonstration models at Ru ... more.

Research & Technology Briefs

Research & Technology Briefs What’s Your Fieldprint? Corn, cotton, soybean, and wheat growers now have access to a free, confidential online tool that will assess how some operational decisions affect natural resource conservation and sustainability. The Fieldprint Calculator, available at www.fieldtomarket.org, provides an easy way to analyze and assess their current land use, energy use, water use, greenhouse gas emissio ... more.

Turning Manure into Energy

... of ash. That's less than two percent of the solids in the manure. “The only other alternatives out there were anaerobic digestion and composting,” he says of his family's decision to build an Elimanure power plant on their farm. “Each one of those options still left us with liquid effluent to deal with. That means you still have 93 to 94 percent of your initial problems, and you still have the expenses of having to land-apply all that liquid.” Turkey producer Greg Langmo of Litchfield, Minn., spearheaded the development of a manure-to-energy plant in Benson, Minn., that draws litter from 300 Minnesota turkey operations. He says manure-fueled power plants are exciting because they represent a scalable, regional solution to a r ... more.

Wetland Enhancement

... for waterfowl and many other species of wildlife. Wetlands add beauty and value to a farm. Planning ahead Will soil hold water? Is there an adequate water supply? Is there adequate upland wildlife habitat available? What wildlife do you want to attract? Will plugging drains or breaking tile lines to enhance the wetland have adverse effects on other parts of your farm, or a neighboring farm? Tech notes Remove trees and brush from embankments and the vegetative spillway area. Protective vegetative cover should be established on exposed surfaces of embankments and spillways. Obtain any necessary permits. Keep livestock from the area, unless it is included in a planned grazing management plan. Dikes and levees should meet NRCS or US Army ... more.

Pest Management

... Precaution is taken to keep any chemicals from leaving the field by leaching, runoff or drift. How it helps Scouting and spot treatment for only those pests that are threatening can save money. Using fewer chemicals improves water quality. Specific treatments for specific pests on specific areas of a field prevents over-treatment of pests. Planning ahead Which soils on your farm are likely to leach pesticides? Did you establish filter strips along streams? Did you consider pest control alternatives? Did you use records of crops and pest control for reference? Did you rotate crops to reduce the chance of pest problems? Tech notes Following are guidelines to follow for applying and mixing pesticides: Complete a pesticide risk assessment of potential ... more.

Nutrient Management

... for nutrients to go unused and wash or infiltrate into water supplies. How it helps Sound nutrient management reduces input costs and protects water quality, by preventing over-application of commercial fertilizers and animal manure. Correct manure and biosolids application on all fields can improve soil tilth and organic matter. Planning ahead Have you tested your soil and livestock manure for their nutrient levels? Are organic wastes or sludge available for you to use? Have you determined realistic yield goals? Are proper soil conservation measures installed? Have you accounted for nitrogen credits produced by legume crops? Tech notes Choose best application method. Use broadcast, starter, surface band or injection. Use the late ... more.

Filter Strip

... it helps Grass, trees and shrubs provide cover for small birds and animals. Ground cover reduces soil erosion. The vegetative strip moves rowcrop operations farther from a stream. Vegetation prevents contaminants from entering water bodies, protecting water quality. Planning ahead Are adequate soil conservation measures installed above filter strips? Are plants adapted to your soil types? Have you selected the correct species of vegetation for the control you need? For example, are you establishing the filter strip around a sinkhole, to control runoff from a feedlot or to filter runoff from cropland? Tech notes Filter strips are most effective on slopes of 5% or less. Filter strips for cropland must be at least 15 feet wide. Steeper slopes require wider ... more.

Wildlife Food Plot

... or other crops standing after harvest to provide food for wildlife over the winter. Or you may plant a small plot elsewhere. These plots help wildlife through the winter when food supplies are in short supply. How it helps Standing crops with unharvested grain give food to wildlife that may otherwise not be accessible after heavy snows or ice. A food plot helps maintain wildlife on your farm by providing food. Planning ahead Will the crop you plan to plant or leave standing in the field attract the wildlife you want? Is there adequate cover and water near the food plot to support wildlife? Are you endangering wildlife by placing the food plot too close to high traffic areas? Tech notes Planting dates range from March 1 to June 15 depending on the crop. ... more.

What are Conservation Buffers?

... we improve our understanding of how to manage for better soil, cleaner water, greater profits and a brighter future. We call this management approach the Core 4. The four fundamental components integrated into this approach are: Conservation Tillage; Crop Nutrient Management; Weed and Pest Management; and Conservation Buffers. If you’d like to learn more about the Core 4 approach, call your local agronomic and/or natural resources professional: * Agricultural Retailer * Certified Crop Advisor * Conservation District * Extension Agent * Independent Crop Consultant * Natural Resources Conservation Service

Topics A-Z

For over 28 years, CTIC has been collecting and disseminating information on agricultural conservation. From air quality to yield, we have information to share. Click on the first letter of your topic to see the resources we have available. Don't see what you're looking for? E-mail us at ctic@ctic.org.

Institutional Membership Benefits

Recognition in two issues of Partners magazine 10% Discount on CTIC products during your annual membership term

Timothy J. Healey, Agrotain International, LLC

... conservation practice that truly minimizes the impact of agriculture on the environment – continuous no-till. Continuous no-till agriculture is smart agriculture. It reduces air and water pollution associated with tillage, improves soil quality and results in higher profits to producers. If you are a company that consumes agricultural products, CTIC is an organization deserving your support. Most businesses involved in processing ag products to produce consumer goods have to comply with air and water regulations. A company can take their commitment to product stewardship one step further by supporting the only organization that promotes continuous no-till agriculture, CTIC.

Past Tours

... training for this year! I not only gained very useful CEU’s in Soil and Water Management…I got to network with people I have not been introduced to before….this was a great experience.” "I thought this year’s tour was focused much more on solutions than merely on practices and that was GREAT!" "We utilize cover crops on our farm knowing how important they are. I learned so much more today and look forward to putting it into practice. THANK YOU!" Conservation in Action Tour 2009 The Conservation In Action Tour 2009 was a success! More than 80 people from 15 states joined CTIC in Western Illinois for a one-day tour visiting three farms and three agricultural facilities. We visited with successful farmers who ... more.

Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS)

... of remote sensing (satellite-based) data to monitor conservation practices in agricultural systems, including various forms of reduced tillage and the planting of winter cover crops. While the OpTIS calculations are performed and validated at the farm-field scale, the privacy of individual producers is fully protected by distributing only spatially-aggregated results – at the county and watershed (8-digit HUC) scale. CTIC has been the primary source of this type of conservation practice monitoring data for nearly 30 years. In partnership with USDA and many others, the CTIC curates and distributes the National Crop Residue Management (CRM) Survey, collected using validated transect methods – annually in most states from 1989 through 2004, and again in 2006 and 2008. When fully imp ... more.

Study Links Best Management Practices To Cleaner Watershed

Environmental Change Initiative, June 2016

What We Do

CTIC champions, promotes, and provides information on technologies and sustainable agricultural systems that conserve and enhance soil, water, air and wildlife resources and are productive and profitable. Lead Projects CTIC is a leader and collaborator in projects that address conservation agriulture's most important topics. Funded by public investments, foundation grants, agribusiness and private dona ... more.

Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico

Mississippi River Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico--Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium USGS Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico Studies National Ocean Service Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Watch

Application Timing Back Button

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project « Application Timing

Strip Tillage Fall Nitrogen Application

... fertilizer in the fall, in a strip-tilled area. He harvested the plots with his yield-monitor-equipped combine. We analyzed his yield data along with fertilizer rate and other data including field observations and soil and plant analysis and we used the Crop Nutrient Response Tool* to determine the maximum economic rate of nitrogen: 212 pounds per acre. We encourage other farmers in the watershed to adopt this approach to collecting information critical to making fully informed nitrogen management decisions. *International Plant Nutrition Institute designed the Crop Nutrient Response Tool to assist interpretation and record-keeping for on-farm field crop trials involving multiple rates of any added nutrient. It provides the an estimate of optimum rate for a single-year response - t ... more.

Webinar Back Button

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project « Webinar

SUPERU Back Button

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project « SUPERU

Strip-till Nitrogen

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project « Strip-till Nitrogen

Strip Tillage Fall Nitrogen Application

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project « Strip Tillage Fall Nitrogen Application

Slow Release Fertilizer Back Button

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project « Slow Release Fertilizer

Phosphorus Sidedress

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project « Phosphorus Sidedress with MicroEssentials®

Nitrogen Application Timing

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project « Nitrogen Application Timing

Connection People Back Button

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project

Agrium Back Button

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project « Agrium's ESN® v. Urea

Tour Agenda

... am Purdue Dairy –West Lafayette, Indiana Managing manure and nutrients to protect water quality Nutrient recycling strategies and management plan Herd/dairy management and research 10:00 am – 1:00 pm Muller Farm –Oxford, Indiana Drainage water management Big Pine Creek watershed project Drainage water management system Absentee landowner Lunch(Muller Farm) 1:30 – 3:00 pm DeSutter Farm –Attica, Indiana Fundamentals of soil health Principles of a soil health system Agronomic and economic benefits of soil health Soil pit and rainfall simulator demonstration ... more.

CTIC in the News

... Farmer, August 2018 Landowners Support Cover Crops Corn and Soybean Digest, August 2018 Time Is Money Corn and Soybean Digest, July 2018 Nitrogen Cycling and Cover Crops Corn and Soybean Digest, June 2018 All In On Cover Crop Corn and Soybean Digest, April 2018 Study Links Best Management Practices To Cleaner Watershed Environmental Change Initiative, June 2016

Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS)

... of remote sensing (satellite-based) data to monitor conservation practices in agricultural systems, including various forms of reduced tillage and the planting of winter cover crops. While the OpTIS calculations are performed and validated at the farm-field scale, the privacy of individual producers is fully protected by distributing only spatially-aggregated results – at the county and watershed (8-digit HUC) scale.

FROM THE FIELD

The Indian Creek Watershed Project demonstrated the power of voluntary conservation practices to impact local water quality. Hear local farmers explain how their community banded together to put conservation systems into action.

2014 Achievements

... The first-ever CTIC Dialogues briefed Washington, DC, staffers on how good policy yields good conservation. • The 6th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture brought people from 51 countries to Winnipeg to share their insight and BMPs. • We hosted a hypoxia panel for leading farm journalists at the Agricultural Media Summit. • Our Indian Creek Watershed Project yielded a highly successful tour and three great presentations at the 2014 International Soil and Water Conservation Society Annual Conference. • We kicked off our 2.5-year Economic, Agronomic and Environmental Benefits of Cover Crops CIG project. • Our 7th annual Conservation in Action Tour brought more than 150 conservation-minded participants to Florida for a look at cutt ... more.

Dow AgroSciences

... AgroSciences also provides educational tools on environmental stewardship. Along with technical explanations of the science behind nitrogen stabilizers on its website, the company provides information on how the nitrogen stabilizers are part of environmental stewardship. In the company's work with CTIC, Dow AgroSciences supports the Indian Creek Watershed Project and served as a Platinum Sponsor for the 6th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture.

REGISTRATION OPEN FOR 2013 TOUR

Registration has opened for the 2013 Conservation In Action Tour! Join us on July 9 and 10 in Livingston, Ill., as we explore innovative conservation practices in and around the Indian Creek watershed. Celebrating the theme of Community 4 Conservation, this year's tour will bring together agriculture leaders from all over the country – including farmers, crop advisors, regulators and lawmakers – to learn and share conservation practices.

Illinois Environmental Protection Agency

Illinois EPA and other partners will conduct water quality monitoring in the watershed to document and determine if conservation practices are making a difference. This project funded in part by IL EPA through Section 319 of the Clean Water Act.

WABASH RIVER BASIN WATER QUALITY TRADING FEASIBILITY STUDY

... Often, these facilities find that it is less expensive to pay producers to implement conservation practices than it is to expand the facility or install new treatment technologies. Through water quality trading, producers, regulated facilities and local water quality all benefit. CTIC’s market feasibility analysis will determine if the necessary conditions exist in the Wabash River watershed to support the development and implementation of a viable, sustainable water quality trading program. Partners U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Agri Drain, Duke Energy, Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts, Indiana Farm Bureau, Indiana Soybean Alliance, and Purdue University Extension Read the Final Report For Mor ... more.

CONSERVATION IN ACTION TOUR 2013

Plan on joining us summer 2013 in Fairbury, Ill. at the Indian Creek Watershed for another unforgettable Tour.

INDIAN CREEK FIELD TOUR

CTIC and farmer leaders will host an informative field tour on July 10, 2012 for participants interested in learning more about products, practices, equipment and technology that are both profitable and responsible. The tour, a funtion of the Indian Creek Watershed Project, will showcase Livingston County farms and field trials in Fairbury, Illinois.

Strip Tillage Fall Nitrogen Application

... application afforded the highest yields Spring application revealed most efficient nitrogen use Fall application displayed lower economic return on nitrogen, due to nitrogen losses Fall timing had lowest yield Split timing was better than fall but not as good as spring application We encourage other farmers in the watershed to adopt this approach to collecting information critical to making fully informed nitrogen management decisions. *International Plant Nutrition Institute designed the Crop Nutrient Response Tool to assist interpretation and record-keeping for on-farm field crop trials involving multiple rates of any added nutrient. It provides the an estimate of optimum rate for a sing ... more.

Economic Benefits with Environmental Protection

Economic Benefits with Environmental Protection Explores many of the challenges, opportunities management tactics and successful marketing efforts that helped shape promotion of conservation in the Great Lakes watershed and North Central region.

PROMOTING COLLABORATIVE, INNOVATIVE LIVESTOCK WASTE MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

Today there are thousands of Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) nationally that require an National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)permit. Producers and their technical service providers need specialized informationand assistance with new technologies to resolve livestock waste management issues and address water quality concerns. Collaborative watershed effortsfocused on managing livestock waste need resourcesto help inform the public and the producers. Project Partner Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 5 Activities This project employs information technology transfer through published articles in CTIC's Partners online magazine, a manure management web site with links toinnovative techn ... more.

Urban Stream Restoration Field Manual

Urban Stream Restoration Field Manual This manual contains urban stream rehabilitation techniques, measured in-stream enhancements of fisheries, habitat, and bethnos, fluvial geomorphic analysis of streams and resulting effects of watershed and stream alterations, and rural applications of the selected stream rehabilitation techniques. These are all described using a straight-forward approach. The manual is full color and 143-pages.

Great Lakes Cover Crop Initiative

Great Lakes Cover Crop Initiative The Great Lakes Cover Crop Initiative (GLCCI) is a regional effort to establish 15 thousand acres of cover crops in the Lake Michigan, Lake Erie and Lake Huron watersheds in three years. This goal will be accomplished through extensive outreach through field days, workshops and other conservation events. In addition to the outreach events, GLCCI coordinators are working in each watershed to give farmers one on one consultations to help them establish successful cover crops and learn to manage their systems to include growing acres of cover crops. ... more.

Conservation In Action Tour 2011 Post-Tour News Release

... Northwest Ohio farms while participants learned how the producers make conservation an integral part of their operations. CTIC welcomed participants from Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Ontario, South Dakota, Washington D.C., and Wisconsin. And more than 15 agribusinesses shared their knowledge, expertise and product information. Rex Martin, CTIC board chair and Syngenta Crop Protection head of industry affairs, shares his thoughts. “This tour really shows the value of CTIC – bringing together a diverse group of people to learn about, talk about and explore new opportunities for conservation in agriculture. Excellent farms, important dialogue and a great mi ... more.

COMMUNICATIONS INTERN WANTED

... and monitor programs, messages and materials to promote conservation agriculture. He/she will assist CTIC staff in creating communications and information material that supports CTIC projects, promotes CTIC and provides value to our membership. Audiences include, among others, federal, state and local government agencies; agriculture industry, media and associations; conservation groups and watershed partnerships. This paid position is available June 1, 2011, for full-time (40-hour week) work through the summer. Qualified interns may extend the work period, at part-time status, through December 2011. See the job description (here) to learn more. Contact Amber Gritter (gritter@ctic.org) to apply.

Upstream Heroes: CTIC Spreads Nutrient Management Success Stories from along the Mississippi River

... practices themselves is wise. Watering cups cut water waste by 50 percent, reducing the volume of manure and increasing its nutrient concentration. Photo courtesy of Steve Werblow "We have been hard at work to reach farmers in Missouri's Bootheel, in south-central and southeastern Minnesota, and in the upper Wabash River watershed, which flows from Ohio through 12 counties in Indiana," Jones says. "At a meeting in early March, I met with representatives of Bootheel Resource Conservation and Development, Inc. and experts from the University of Missouri, the Missouri Corn Growers Association, and others, to look at the latest tools and techniques in farm nutrient management. There is a lot to talk about that makes ... more.

Ecocommerce: The Next Generation Ecoservice Market

... land management. Photo courtesy of USDA-NRCS. Ecocommerce: The Next-Generation Ecoservice Market Today’s ecoservice markets By Tim Gieseke Seventy-five years ago, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) placed value on soil resources with the creation of the Soil Conservation Service, now known as the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), creating incentive programs to encourage producers to conserve soil. Several decades later, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency implemented a regulatory approach to resource conservation. Both efforts succeeded to a point. However, their shortcomings have initiated ecoservice markets. After a decade of progress, ... more.

4R Nutrient Stewardship: Why Now?

... fertilization, seeding and secondary application of nutrients. Additional BMPs, including no-till and low-till systems, conservation buffers and nitrate reducers, are being implemented. Cover crops are also being used to hold the soil in place and prevent erosion, while reducing a crop’s overall nitrogen needs through bacterial fixation. Whether farmers rely upon their own knowledge or the agronomic expertise of a fertilizer retailer, certified crop advisor (CCA), farm manager or extension services specialist, BMPs that incorporate one or more elements of the 4R nutrient stewardship system are maximizing profits per acre, while minimizing impacts on the environment. Many roles in promoting the 4R system Each agricultural stakeholder may be tied to the social, ec ... more.

Stream Protection

... water quality results from reducing amounts of nutrients, chemicals, animal waste and sediment entering the stream. Buffer zones provide cover and habitat for birds and small animals. Planning ahead Have you planned to install an offstream water system for livestock or limited livestock access to the stream? Are proper soil conservation measures installed in the stream watershed to prevent siltation of buffer zones and streambed? Will a stream crossing be needed for livestock? Tech notes Fence livestock out of the stream. Smooth streambanks to provide an adequate seedbed for vegetation. The vegetation area along streambanks should be between 15 and 25 feet wide. * Remove fallen trees, stumps and debris that might cause turbulence in the stream. Remove t ... more.

NPS Monitoring Workshop Presentations

Intro to Watershed Planning & 9 Elements Getting the Big Picture Purposes of Chemical, Physical, and Biological Monitoring Common Monitoring Parameters Accessing Existing and Web Based Data Using Hoosier RiverWatch Data for Assessment and Planning Observational Approaches to Monitoring and Assessment Characterizing Baseline Water Body Conditions Interpreting and Using Existing Data to Identify P ... more.

Don't miss the CTIC Conservation In Action Tour 2008

... practices in their profitable operations. Starkey Farms Partnership , Brownsburg, Indiana • 8 years of continuous no-till • Gradually incorporated 200 acres of annual ryegrass as cover crop • Gypsum added as a soil amendment to improve soil structure and infiltration • Tile Nitrogen outflow monitored by a local university because the farm is within a watershed that supplies drinking water to nearby Indianapolis Lamb Farms , Lebanon, Indiana • 84% of corn and soybeans are no-till or strip-till • RTK systems used to apply and manage nutrients • 98 percent of compost produced is used on their farm for fertilizer and soil amendment • Nearly 50 acres of conservation buffers along ditches Meadowlane Farms , Frankfort, ... more.

Planning Now Can Avoid Permit Later

... an NPDES permit. Clearly, the bottom line is that anyone helping livestock producers navigate the regulatory straits will need to keep a close eye on the words used in the regulation, as well as EPA guidance on manmade devices “similar to” ditches. The stakes, and the potential benefits, are high for both the medium-sized producer and the rest of the stakeholders in their watershed. Applying for an NPDES permit can be expensive and time-consuming—a particular challenge for relatively modest-sized farms—and compliance can require expensive modifications to a farm operation. Clear-eyed assessment and a clear sense of water quality regulations can help medium AFO operators protect water quality while reducing their regulatory burden. CAFO vs. AFO At their m ... more.

National Soil Tilth Laboratory

National Soil Tilth Laboratory USDA Agricultural Research Service Established 1989 Research laboratory within the USDA-ARS organization charged with conducting research on farming systems and their impact on air, soil, and water quality. Multidisciplinary research teams address problems using multiple scales of studies that range from basic laboratory analyses of soils to watershed and regional assessment of farming systems impacts on environmental quality and production efficiency. Mission, Goals and Contact Information www.ars.usda.gov/mwa/ames/nstl

COVER CROPS AND CONSERVATION TILLAGE REDUCE NONPOINT SOURCE POLLUTION

This project, funded by EPA's Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, will demonstrate the effectiveness of cover crops and conservation tillage systems to decrease agricultural nonpoint source pollution and inform producers about the economic benefits of the systems. CTIC and partners will assist agricultural producers in the Lake Michigan, Lake Erie, and Lake Huron watersheds with implementation of cover crops and conservation tillage systems on 15,000 acres by April 2013. Producers will receive technical, educational and social support to fully understand the benefits of cover crops and conservation tillage, to correctly incorporate the practices into their operation, to evaluate the changes and adapt management to optimize yield and resource protection. By providin ... more.

Putting Producers in the Driver's Seat

... can help to increase soil organic matter, eliminate compaction problems and reduce nitrate loss to nearby waterways. Smart Drainage System™ Photo courtesy of Agri Drain Putting Producers in the Driver's Seat By Lisa Newby The public is becoming more aware of what agricultural producers have always known – the cornerstone of environmental conservation is good resource management, and working together is essential. The Agricultural Drainage Management Coalition (ADMC) realizes cooperation is critical to environmental success. ADMC members serve as a resource on the latest technologies in drainage water management systems. Together, they utilize a public/private approach to qu ... more.

Field Days Featured Tools for Farm Profitability

... Scott Crumpecker spoke to field day participants, including area high school students. He highlighted nitrogen management, issues related to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, and how agricultural producers can fine tune their nitrogen application practices to save money and benefit water quality. Mike Milam, University of Missouri Extension Service, spoke with high school students about how watersheds work and how we all have an impact on water quality downstream. For more information on efficient use of nitrogen, or future educational opportunities, contact David Dunn, University of Missouri Delta Center, at 573-379-5431 or dunnd@missouri.edu. Profitability Through Nitrogen Efficiency was provided through efforts of the Bootheel Nutrient Management Committee funded in part by Ass ... more.