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Additional Resources

... Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) Demonstration Projects Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) Grazing and Rangeland Hypoxia Know Your Watershed Leadership Mississippi River Basin Initiative (MRBI) No-Till National Aquatic Resource Survey (NARS) National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) Nutrient Management Operational Tillage Assessment System (OpTIS) Pasture Ridge Till Soil Health Strip Till Tours Training Water Quality Watershed Groups Watershed Implementation and Innovation Network (WIIN) Weed Management Wetlands

Crop Residue Management

Leaving last year's crop residue on the soil surface by limiting tillage. Includes no-till, mulch-till and ridge till. How it works Leaving last year's crop residue on the surface before and during planting operations provides cover for the soil at a critical time of the year. The residue is left on the surface by reducing tillage operations and turning the soil less. Pieces of crop residue shield soil particles from rain and wind until plants can produce a protective canopy. How it help ... more.

Tillage Type Definitions

... the use of cover crops after low residue producing crops. CRM includes all field operations that affect residue amounts, orientation and distribution throughout the period requiring protection. Site-specific residue cover amounts needed are usually expressed in percentage but may also be in pounds. CRM is an “umbrella” term encompassing several tillage systems including no-till, ridge-till, mulch-till, and reduced-till. Conservation Tillage Types (30 percent or more crop residue left, after planting). Any tillage and planting system that covers 30 percent or more of the soil surface with crop residue, after planting, to reduce soil erosion by water. Where soil erosion by wind is the primary concern, any system that maintains at least 1,000 pounds per acre of flat, smal ... more.

Fast vs. Fuel - The New No-Till Debate

... will be a more regulatory approach," he predicts. "I'd rather be part of a preemptive movement." Drainage Water Management Is Part of the Conservation Agriculture Continuum Grower Tony Thompson of Windom, Minn., sees his drainage water management system as an integral part of his broad approach to conservation agriculture, which includes ridge-till, cover cropping, closed tile intakes and other best management practices. "The farmer has to think about water before the rain droplets strike the soil," Thompson notes. "The first thought is how to try to prevent the raindrop from striking bare soil. Once it's on the soil surface, we want it seeping into the ground and not running off the field, so we'r ... more.

Using Cover Crops to Facilitate the Transition to Continuous No-Till

Using cover crops and continuous no-till together in a conservation system over time maximizes soil health and may lead to yield increases and other benefits. Photo courtesy of CTIC Using Cover Crops to Facilitate the Transition to Continuous No-Till Why this project? Using cover crops and continuous no-till together in a conservation ... more.

Lessening the Pain

The residue left on the field and the soil structure improved with a no-till cropping system may also give producers an advantage in this cold, wet harvest season. Photo courtesy of CTIC Lessening the Pain For farmers choosing no-till, this fall’s wet harvest has been a bit less painful By Christy Couch Lee What a year it’s been. It began with a cold, wet planting seas ... more.

Conservation Tillage Photos and Graphics

... a large (12-row) planter through a field, depositing seeds in the soil while hardly disturbing the surface of the field (no-till). The field is covered with stalks and other crop residues from a past corn harvest. These crop residues will protect the soil while nourishing the new crop. Size: 997 x 1000 pixels (566k) Source: Case The rows in this field have been ridged by farming equipments system known as ridge-till. The farmer then plants new seeds on top of each ridge while keeping the stalks and other crop residues on the surface of the field. Size: 1000 x 679 pixels (417k) Source: CTIC This graphic explains some of the benefits of no-till and illustrates the no-till planting method. (this graphic most appropriate for use in corn growing ... more.

USING COVER CROPS TO FACILITATE THE TRANSITION TO CONTINUOUS NO-TILL

This project, funded by a 2008 Conservation Innovation Grant, promotes the use of cover crops to ease farmers’ transition to use of continuous no-till. Continuous no-till (CNT) has been around long enough that there is little doubt among experts of its many advantages. Despite the proven economic and environmental benefits of CNT, some farmers remain hesitant to fully adopt the system. In 2004, the National Crop Residue Management survey indicated that only 22.6 percent of farmers were no-tilling. Attempting CNT without proper technical knowled ... more.

Diversion

... the outlet planned in a location which will not cause erosion? Is the diversion and outlet large enough to handle the runoff amount for that location? Tech notes Diversions cannot substitute for terraces used for erosion control. Diversions must be built to carry at least the peak amount of runoff generated by a 10-year, 24-hour storm. * Minimum top width for a diversion ridge is four feet. * Each diversion must have an outlet. A grassed waterway, grade stabilization structure, or underground outlet is acceptable. Establish vegetative outlets before a diversion is constructed. Diversions should not be built in high sediment producing areas unless other conservation measures are installed too. Maintenance Keep outlet clear of debris. Keep burrowing anima ... more.

Conservation Reserve Program - Exit Strategies

A group of agriculture and conservation stakeholders in the Pacific Northwest is working to devise strategies that will ease the transition of land protected under the Conservation Reserve Program to no-till production system. Photo courtesy of CTIC Conservation Reserve Program – Exit Strategies By Russ Evans In the rain-fed region of the inland Pacific Northwest (PNW) – especially the dryer, low rainfall regions that rely on summer fallow – the regular calls for Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) signup were m ... more.

CROP RESIDUE MANAGEMENT SURVEY

... Survey is a valuable tool that can be used to measure adoption of important soil-saving practices, demonstrate energy cost savings and monitor efforts to improve the environment. The Survey has been compiled and tracked by CTIC since 1982 and is the only survey in the U.S. to measure and track the type of tillage used by crop at the county level. Tillage methods tracked include no-till, ridge-till, reduced-till and intensive/conventional tillage, according to NRCS definitions. Project Partners State offices of the Natural Resources Conservation Service, local NRCS field offices, Conservation Districts and Extension offices Project Description The nationwide survey of conservation tillage practices started as a partnership effort between CTIC and the U ... more.

Strip Till Nitrogen Application

Keep nutrients in the Right Place, where crops can use them. The farmer uses real-time kinematic precision guidance to apply N fertilizer in fall or early spring in a closely-controlled location relative to where the seed will be sown. Strip-till conservation systems use minimal tillage. They combine soil drying and warming benefits of conventional tillage and soil-protecting advantages of no-till by disturbing only the portion of soil that will contain the seed row. Here we are using fall applied N with an RTK strip-till system and comparing it to a conventional chisel plow system. A special feature at this site is the demonstratio ... more.

Strip-till Nitrogen

Keep nutrients in the Right Place, where crops can use them. The farmer uses real-time kinematic precision guidance to apply N fertilizer in fall or early spring in a closely-controlled location relative to where the seed will be sown. Strip-till conservation systems use minimal tillage. They combine soil drying and warming benefits of conventional tillage and soil-protecting advantages of no-till by disturbing only the portion of soil that will contain the seed row. Here we are using fall applied N with an RTK strip-till system and comparing it to a conventional chisel plow system. A special featu ... more.

Experts Dispute Study That Relates No-Till to Algae Problem

Phosphorus runoff contributes to the shoreline of Lake Erie accumulating algae. Photo courtesy of EPA Experts Dispute Study That Relates No-Till to Algae Problem Rachel Doctor Last spring, a study conducted by Hiedelberg College's water lab in Tiffin, Ohio, reported that no-till farming was contributing to the dissolved phosphorus that enters the water supply and causes an accumulation of algae in Lake Erie. According to Norm Widman, national agronomist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), ... more.

No-Till 2011 Conference

The No-Till 2011 Conference is a program of innovative speakers providing for maximum interaction between agriculture professionals ranging from producers to industry experts. No-Till 2011 is a conference designed to bring the latest developments in no-till cropping systems to interested farmers and ranchers from Oklahoma and surrounding states. For more details, view the conference brochure. ... more.

The Great Crop Rotation Cover-Up

Josh Lloyd tries to do "what Mother Nature does" on his farm near Clay Center, Kansas. That means a no-till system combined with the planting of a polyculture of cover crops -- turnips, radishes and canola -- in rotation with his sorghum and wheat acres. Caldwell, Jeff. 2009. The great crop rotation cover-up. Agriculture Online. Using Cover_crops SAG 08 09 This is a literature review of cover crop benefits from Dabney et al. 2001 and Dabney 1996. Oilseed_Radish ... more.

Don't miss the CTIC Conservation In Action Tour 2008

... see first-hand how conservation works on Indiana farms. We invite you to be a part of this informative and noteworthy event. The tour, sponsored by Specialty Fertilizer Products (SFP), showcases successful farmers who have mastered innovative conservation practices in their profitable operations. Starkey Farms Partnership , Brownsburg, Indiana • 8 years of continuous no-till • Gradually incorporated 200 acres of annual ryegrass as cover crop • Gypsum added as a soil amendment to improve soil structure and infiltration • Tile Nitrogen outflow monitored by a local university because the farm is within a watershed that supplies drinking water to nearby Indianapolis Lamb Farms , Lebanon, Indiana • 84% of corn and soybeans are no-till o ... more.

Southern Plains Agricultural Resources Coalition (SPARC)

Southern Plains Agricultural Resources Coalition (SPARC) Established 2006 The Southern Plains Agricultural Resources Coalition will spark rural sustainability and profitability through greater use of no-till practices and conservation systems for producers, consumers, and communities by promotion of market based incentives, education, demonstration, participation, and research. Mission, Goals and Contact Information Mission Statement The Southern Plains Agricultural Resources Coalition will spark rural sustainability and profitability through greater use of no-till practices and conse ... more.

Timothy J. Healey, Agrotain International, LLC

CTIC Member since 2003 Initially, Agrotain International joined CTIC to be affiliated with an organization that promoted no-till agriculture directly to farmers, to increase name recognition of our products with producers, and to provide product for demonstration purposes in areas where CTIC was promoting no-till agriculture. We win farmers as customers one at a time, and we were hoping that the affiliation with CTIC would give us more opportunity for direct contact with more producers. Heretofore we saw the benefits ... more.

Agricultural Drainage Management: Benefits Could Range from the Bin to the Gulf

... will be a more regulatory approach," he predicts. "I'd rather be part of a preemptive movement." Drainage Water Management Is Part of the Conservation Agriculture Continuum Grower Tony Thompson of Windom, Minn., sees his drainage water management system as an integral part of his broad approach to conservation agriculture, which includes ridge-till, cover cropping, closed tile intakes and other best management practices. "The farmer has to think about water before the rain droplets strike the soil," Thompson notes. "The first thought is how to try to prevent the raindrop from striking bare soil. Once it's on the soil surface, we want it seeping into the ground and not running off the field, so we'r ... more.

Crop Nutrient Management Facts

Crop Nutrient Management Facts What is it? It is a system of crop production with little, if any, tillage. It increases the residue from the crop that remains in the field after harvest through planting. This results in increased natural recycling of crop residues. Used on 38% (109 million acres) of all U.S. cropland (293 million planted acres). Goal is 50% (146 million acres) of the planted cropland in the U.S. by 2004. Where is the use of conservation tillage expected t ... more.

Conservation Tillage

Conservation Tillage Facts What is it? It is a system of crop production with little, if any, tillage. It increases the residue from the crop that remains in the field after harvest through planting. This results in increased natural recycling of crop residues. Used on 38% (109 million acres) of all U.S. cropland (293 million planted acres). Goal is 50% (146 million acres) of the ... more.

More Acres Can Also Mean More Conservation

Schroeder planted corn into soybean residue without disturbing the soil. No-till helps reduce erosion, saves time and money, and improves water and soil quality. Photo courtesy of Jason Johnson More Acres Can Also Mean More Conservation By Jason Johnson As the number of Iowa farmers decreases and the average farm size increases, that can mean more conservation on the ground – especiall ... more.

No-Till Farming Systems & Companion CD

No-Till Farming Systems The highly anticipated World Association of Soil and Water Conservation - Special Publication No. 3 - No-Till Farming Systems book has been released in the United States. As co-publisher, CTIC is honored to be the designated U.S. distributor. "No-till farming systems have been developed and applied around the world over several decades. The technology is dynamic: it ... more.

Conservation In Action Tour 2011 Post-Tour News Release

... quality. And these farmers, who make a profit while protecting resources, share their stories and offer advice to others wanting to make similar changes.” Tour stops included The Andersons, where participants learned how this company aids the region’s producers in applying the right fertilizer source at the right rate, at the right time and in the right place. At Bridgewater Dairy, owner Dr. Leon Weaver discussed how his 4,000 head family-run dairy recycles manure – using a methane digester and targeted application – and grows its own cow feed on 2,300 acres of corn. Joe Nester, independent crop consultant, described agricultural technology used at the dairy and methods for improving production efficiency and profitability. Participants ... more.

Success Story June 2010

... Crops Work with Various Crop Production Systems By Jason Johnson According to a panel of Iowa farmers, agronomists and soil conservationists, cover crops such as rye, wheat and clover are environmentally beneficial and with proper management won’t inhibit yields on various crop production systems, including no-till and organic farming. At a recent Cover Crops Workshop in Jefferson, Iowa, dozens gathered to discuss and learn more about the many benefits and varieties of cover crops, and ways to successfully plant and manage them. Research by the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment (NLAE) shows cover crops planted in the fall between h ... more.

CTIC Welcomes New Members

... catalytic reduction systems in its facilities and has implemented projects to reduce toxic emissions of ammonia, nitrate and methanol. Currently, the company is installing low-NOx burners and greenhouse abatement systems to further reduce NOx and carbon dioxide emissions. www.terraindustries.com INSTITUTIONAL Alberta Reduced Tillage LINKAGES (RTL) The Alberta Reduced Tillage LINKAGES (RTL) program is a partnership with broad-based farmer, industry, educational, wildlife and government support. RTL's mission is to be a reliable and trustworthy resource focused on increasing the adoption of sustainable production systems by Alberta farmers and ranchers. www.reducedtillage.ca/ ... more.

What is a Crop Nutrient Management Plan?

... Soil test. How much of each nutrient (N-P-K and other critical elements such as pH and organic matter) is in the soil profile? The soil test is a key component needed for developing the nutrient rate recommendation. 3. Crop sequence. Did the crop that grew in the field last year (and in many cases two or more years ago) fix nitrogen for use in the following years? Has long-term no-till increased organic matter? Did the end-of-season stalk test show a nutrient deficiency? These factors also need to be factored into your plan. 4. Estimated yield. Factors that affect yield are numerous and complex. Your field’s soils, drainage, insect, weed and disease pressure, rotation and many other factors differentiate one field from another. This is why using historic yields is im ... more.

National Crop Residue Management Survey

The National Crop Residue Management (CRM) Survey is the only survey in the U.S. to measure at the county level the type of tillage used by crop. Tillage methods tracked are: no-till, mulch-till, reduced-till, and conventional tillage. Click here to see the tillage definitions. Available Data Data is available online from 1989 to 2008. Some of the data can be accessed without a password (unsecured data) and the rest requires a log in and password (secured data). Passwords are given to institutional and corporate memb ... more.

Adding Cover Crops to a No-Till System

Dan Forgey, farm manager at Cronin Farms in South Dakota, has been using no-till management for more than 17 years. Over that time, Forgey has developed a keen understanding of how his farming system works and where new challenges and opportunities exist. The Next Step: Adding Cover Crop to a No-Till System (Video)

Soil Agronomy-No-Till Management

During the first 3-4 years of a no-till system, the soil biology and chemistry undergoes several significant changes. No-Till Management- Nitrogen Management

COVER CROPS AND CONSERVATION TILLAGE REDUCE NONPOINT SOURCE POLLUTION

This project, funded by EPA's Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, will demonstrate the effectiveness of cover crops and conservation tillage systems to decrease agricultural nonpoint source pollution and inform producers about the economic benefits of the systems. CTIC and partners will assist agricultural producers in the Lake Michigan, Lake Erie, and Lake Huron watersheds with implementation of cover crops and conservation tillage systems on 15,000 acres by April 2013. Producers will receive technical, educational and social supp ... more.

No-till Farmer

CTIC Institutional Member, No-Till Farmer, provides the management information for farmers interested in and practicing reduced tillage techniques. To learn more about No-Till Farmer, visit www.no-tillfarmer.com/

CONSERVATION AGRICULTURE SYSTEMS ALLIANCE (CASA)

... and partners Promote consistent messages about conservation agriculture Share information about conservation agriculture Endorse adoption of "the ideal" conservation agriculture systems Facilitate removal of barriers and support member organizations Influence policy on a broad level Current CASA Members Conservation Tillage Workgroup (California) Delta Conservation Demonstration Center (Mississippi) Georgia Conservation Tillage Alliance Innovative Cropping Systems (Virginia) Manitoba-North Dakota Zero Tillage Farmers Association Mexican Conservation Tillage Association No-Till on the Plains Ohio No-Till Council Pacific Northwest Direct Seed Association Pennsylvania No-Till Alli ... more.

Soil Quality: More than a Soil Test

... and which management practices will improve soil function. SOIL BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS Respiration All soil breathes. The rate of respiration, which is determined by measuring carbon dioxide production in the soil, indicates biological activity. High respiration does not always indicate good soil quality. When oxygen is added to the plow depth, as in conventional tillage methods, biological activity increases temporarily and microorganisms rapidly decompose organic matter. Mike Hubbs (left), agronomist with NRCS, collecting core sample for bulk density while waiting on respiration test. This high rate of biological activity in a system of low residue inputs decreases soil organic matter. Less organic matter degrades overall soil qu ... more.

CTIC News

... owned and operated by the Hula family, living proof that profitability and natural resources conservation go hand in hand; the Archer Ruffin farm for discussions about agriculture’s responsibility for stewardship, carbon markets and profitable conservation; lunch at the Shirley Plantation, the oldest family-owned business in North America; the Carter farm where no-till cotton grows successfully in cool soil temperatures; and a series of presentations at the Paul Davis farm. These will include how agriculture will play a significant role in removing water quality impairments in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and what Clean Water Act and Total Maximum Daily Load regulations could mean to agriculture and the region. The day will end with a stea ... more.

Research and Technology Briefs

... field conditions and with a wide range of crops. To learn more, or to download or purchase a copy of this manual, visit www.sare.org/publications/croprotation.htm. Farmers can take steps to reduce manure pathogens in runoff Scientists with The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center say farmers who apply manure as a fertilizer to their no-till field can decrease the chance that pathogens end up in runoff, which can pose environmental and health hazards. These researchers studied the transport of Cryptosporidium – a parasite present in animal waste – through no-till and tilled fields. They found that a greater amount of the parasite moved along with excess water through no-till fields and into tile drains than in till ... more.

Apply gypsum to your fields to balance soil structure, Improve nutrient uptake, and yield heartier, healthier crops

... thinner, many growers are getting back to basics by applying gypsum (calcium sulfate), which helps improve the structure and balance of their soil. Improving your business from the ground up—and down Gypsum has been used for centuries as a soil additive. Its use has been widespread in Europe, and it is growing in popularity in the United States. Gypsum is especially popular in no-till systems, because of the marked improvement in soil structure and decrease in soil compaction. There are three ways to obtain gypsum. It can be mined, but this method is not usually readily available or cost-effective. The second method is to reclaim and recycle gypsum products, including drywall from new construction projects. The final method is to collect the calcium sulfate that is the b ... more.

Research and Technology Briefs Dec 2008 II

... just the beginning, Kladivko says. MCCC plans to add a cover crop selection tool — a hands-on learning module to help farmers select the cover crop that would benefit them the most. CTIC is assisting MCCC in the development of the cover crop selection tool. That tool is part of a three-year, two-state project, called Using Cover Crops to Facilitate the Transition to Continuous No-Till, funded by a 2008 Conservation Innovation Grant awarded to CTIC by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. CTIC and MCCC, along with The Ohio State University, Ohio No-Till Council, Purdue University, Michigan State University, Ag Conservation Solutions and the Owen County Soil and Water Conservation District will work with four farmers in Indiana and four farmers in Ohio to assist them ... more.

2009 Tour Wrap-Up

... a fantastic day! It's wonderful to see so many groups working together for a great cause. Great housts, great food, great conversation. I hope this tour continues and grows every year!" Learning from the land stewards who share their experiences." "In-field look at practices implemented by farmers doing no-till and strip-till. Networking with other growers." "Great day! Very informative and everyone was well prepared and organized." "Interaction between different groups and views with the same goal in mind." "Getting the chance to learn about efficiency practices in development and practice." "Interacting w ... more.

Strip-till Nitrogen

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project « Strip-till Nitrogen

FACILITATING CONSERVATION FARMING PRACTICES AND ENHANCING ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY WITH AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY

CTIC, with funding provided by the United Soybean Board, updated its 2003 publication on conservation tillage and biotechnology. CTIC's new publication, "Facilitating Conservation Farming Practices and Enhancing Environmental Sustainability with Agricultural Biotechnology", explores the environmental benefits of conservation tillage practices, which are facilitated significantly by biotechnology crops. The publication, reviewed by a panel of experts, shows the dramatic improvements in en ... more.

Biological and biochemical soil properties in no-till corn with different cover crops.

... in many positive ways. These include higher total carbon, which usually contributes to increased cation exchange capacity and water-holding capacity. <span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%;Calibri" ,"sans-serif";times="" new="" roman";times="" roman";"="">Biological and biochemical soil properties in no-till corn with different cover crops.

Understanding Conservation Tillage Systems Resources

Find the following CTIC resources in the Free Download section of CTIC’s Online Store. Better Soil, Better Yields is a guidebook to improving soil organic matter and infiltration with continuous no-till. Facilitating Conservation Farming Practices and Enhancing Environmental Sustainability with Agricultural Biotechnology explores environmental benefits of conservation tillage, facilitated significantly by biotechnology crops. A Review of BMPs for Managing Crop Nutrients and Conservation Tillage to Improve Water Quality reviews research on nutrient best management practices (BMPs) ... more.

Switching to Conservation Tillage

Biotech crops have reduced the risks and challenges of switching to conservation tillage or no-till practices. Since glyphosate-tolerant crops were introduced in 1996, acreage of no-till full-season soybeans in the U.S. has increased by nearly 70%. Click here to see the data.

Top 10 Conservation Tillage Benefits

Conservation tillage systems offer numerous benefits that intensive or conventional tillage simply can’t match: 1. Reduces labor, saves time As little as one trip for planting compared to two or more tillage operations means fewer hours on a tractor and fewer labor hours to pay ... or more acres to farm. For instance, on 500 acres the time savings can be as much as 225 hours per year. T ... more.

CASA Conference Call February 2010

... about how to tie into FAO message. Purdue University approached CTIC and CASA to be a partner on a new proposal to CSREES for a 2-year, $200,000 planning grant. Brian will talk with Chuck Rice to discuss possibility for nationwide proposal using all of CASA network. Karen to draft letter of interest for Acgo; get comments from members and then send to Dave Brandt to present to Acgo. Still want to work together (Brian and Peter) on working paper of what research should look like and direction it should take. Want to work on CASA PowerPoint that each member can use to promote CASA at their meetings, etc. Community of Practice in support of Conservation Agriculture – Karen to resend to group. Member Updates Reduced Tillage LINKAGES: Finished FarmTech conference; 1 ... more.

Research and Tech Briefs June 2010

... it's easy to use and gives instant results that invite users to try out alternatives and ask 'what if' questions. The University of Aberdeen, commissioned by Unilever, designed the tool for farmers, supply chain managers and companies interested in quantifying their agricultural carbon footprint and finding practical ways of reducing it. Study Demonstrates No-Till Improves Soil Stability A joint Agricultural Research Service (ARS)-multi-university study across the central Great Plains, on the effects of more than 19 years of various tillage practices, shows that no-till makes soil much more stable than plowed soil. The study was led by Humberto Blanco-Canqui at Kansas State Universityat Hays, Kan., and Maysoon Mikha at the ARS Central Gre ... more.

Date and Location Set for 2009 Conservation in Action Tour

... Illinois! An engrossed group of Conservation In Action Tour participants listens to a discussion at one of the Beck's Hybrids seed company's greenhouses. Photo Courtesy of Purity Mason Side-by-side demonstration models at Rulon Enterprises show how ground water appears in a conventional tilled field (left) versus a no-till field (right) with residue on the soil surface. Photo Courtesy of Purity Mason At Lamb Farms, drywall scrap from construction projects is ground into gypsum and spread on fields as a soil amendment. Photo courtesy of Randall Reeder Participants in the Conservat ... more.

Conservation In Action Tour 2009

... a fantastic day! It's wonderful to see so many groups working together for a great cause. Great hosts, great food, great conversation. I hope this tour continues and grows every year!" "Learning from the land stewards who share their experiences." "In-field look at practices implemented by farmers doing no-till and strip-till. Networking with other growers." "Great day! Very informative and everyone was well prepared and organized." "Interaction between different groups and views with the same goal in mind." "Getting the chance to learn about efficiency practices in development and practice." "Interacting w ... more.

John Deere Advances Stewardship in Agriculture

... low-disturbance injection technology to place anhydrous ammonia beneath the soil surface. It uses 30 percent less fuel and disturbs the soil less than traditional shank and knife application. “The 2510H gives producers a way to apply nitrogen closer to the time of crop need and uptake,” Bradley says. “This is a big piece of the sustainability picture. And, for no-till producers, this is great. Many no-till producers haven’t been able to use the lowest-cost form of nitrogen – anhydrous ammonia – because conventional methods of applying anhydrous can cause too much soil disturbance.” “Coupled with Deere’s PitStop Pro™ tendering system, the 2510H makes planned side-dress applications more feasible and profitable th ... more.

4R Nutrient Stewardship: Why Now?

... such as global positioning systems, satellite or aerial images, and information management tools help farmers assess the variability of a field and, in turn, allow for a more accurate determination of fertilizer and agricultural input needs. Variable rate technology allows different rates of fertilization, seeding and secondary application of nutrients. Additional BMPs, including no-till and low-till systems, conservation buffers and nitrate reducers, are being implemented. Cover crops are also being used to hold the soil in place and prevent erosion, while reducing a crop’s overall nitrogen needs through bacterial fixation. Whether farmers rely upon their own knowledge or the agronomic expertise of a fertilizer retailer, certified crop advisor (CCA), farm ma ... more.

International Meeting Spotlights Conservation Agriculture's Role in Mitigating Climate Change

... Bringing experts from an array of disciplines, from soil science to economics, to focus on carbon sequestration was a bold move to use science and markets to promote opportunities for farmers around the world. “To create working markets for farmers' efforts to capture atmospheric carbon, we need to understand the science of how carbon acts in the soil, and the science behind no-till systems,” said Karen Scanlon, executive director of CTIC. “With that insight, we can quantify the effect that farmers have with specific practices and on specific soils, and create a fair compensation structure for those effects.” A Working Meeting After sharing their research results and field experiences from six continents, the participants spent several hours at the ... more.

Conservation in Action Tour 2009

... a fantastic day! It's wonderful to see so many groups working together for a great cause. Great housts, great food, great conversation. I hope this tour continues and grows every year!" Learning from the land stewards who share their experiences." "In-field look at practices implemented by farmers doing no-till and strip-till. Networking with other growers." "Great day! Very informative and everyone was well prepared and organized." "Interaction between different groups and views with the same goal in mind." "Getting the chance to learn about efficiency practices in development and practice." ... more.

Wildlife Food Plot

... 1 to June 15 depending on the crop. * Food plots should be planted on the least erosive areas of the selected field. Plots on slopes steeper than 5% should be planted on the contour. A plot can be planted on the same area each year as long as soil loss does not exceed acceptable limits. Accepted crops include: corn, sorghum, oats, barley, wheat, sunflower, buckwheat, millet, partridge pea and soybeans. * Soybeans and sunflowers can not be used in Conservation Reserve Program food plots. * Reduced till or no-till planting in encouraged. Maintenance Exclude livestock Don't control weeds with herbicides unless noxious weeds persist. If herbicides are needed, spot spray. Avoid using herbicides that would endanger adjacent seedings. * Criteria may need ... more.

No Tillage: The relationship between no tillage, crop residues, plants and soil nutrition

No Tillage: The relationship between no tillage, crop residues, plants and soil nutrition In his second book on no-till farming, Chilean farmer Carlos Crovetto has delved into the inner workings of the soil and meticulously explained the relationship between no-till, crop residues, soil nutrition and crop production.

Brian Lindley, No-Till on the Plains, Inc.

CTIC Member Since 2001 Initially, No-Till on the Plains, Inc., joined CTIC for the information exchange, networking and notification of pertinent meetings. I believe these have been great benefits of our membership. In addition, I enjoy and utilize the articles and research and technology information found in CTIC’s online magazine, Partners. The benefits far exceed the cost of membership in CTIC. What a beneficial organizatio ... more.

CTIC Launches New Conservation Information Website

... Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC), a clearinghouse of information on conservation farming practices, has launched its brand-new website at www.ctic.org. The easy-to-search, simple-to-navigate site contains thousands of documents and links to information on conservation farming systems. Among the highlights are: A searchable database from the Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS), which uses satellite imagery to provide detailed data on tillage practices and cover crops at the county or watershed (HUC-8) scale; Cover crop insight, including details of the economic and environmental benefits of cover crops and the results of five annual farmer surveys on cover crop use; Tips on organizing watershed groups and multi-stakeholder conservation ... more.

Past Tours

... farmers are using for soil, water and air quality conservation. Highlights included the importance of water management on diversified crop operations, how a feedlot manages their pens, manure, and composting, plus an engineered wetland, the soil building strategies in potato rotations and how one family farm is building the thin soils on their sloping operation through cover cropping, no-till and the reintroduction of livestock to the operation. Find out more on our tour wrap-up page. Conservation in Action Tour 2015 From the cover crops of the Hmong American Farmers Association farm near Hastings to Northfield farmer Dave Legvold’s saturated buffers and the impeccable dairy and manure handling system at Burfeind Dairy Farm near Goodhue, participants in the Conservati ... more.

Project Farmers in the News

Penton Agriculture Magazines: "Cover Crop Success"-Berger "With Each Season Comes New Lessons"-Eilers, Scott Stick With It"-Berger "A Seed Corn, Covers Duet"-Schirm "Farmers Join Nat'l Study on Cover Crops"-McKenzie Other Sources: "No-Till, Cover Crops from a Farmer's Point of View"-Scott

2010 Tour Wrap-Up

... thought this year’s tour was focused much more on solutions than merely on practices and that was GREAT!" "Meeting new friends in our business and seeing beautiful parts of the country. Great to see people out of Washington on Tour to learn more about agriculture." "The farmers — seeing and hearing how no-till works, the media hearing our story, the government officials having the 'live' experience." Conservation In Action Tour 2011 Mark your calendars for next year's Conservation In Action Tour, scheduled to take place in Northwest Ohio during the second week of August. Many thanks to this year's Conservatio ... more.

Sidedress Phosphorus + MicroEssentials

... uniform nutrient distribution and provides essential nutrients crops need in one granule. It has two forms of sulfur for season-long nutrition. Operation Herb and Aaron Steffen, of Cropsey, Ill., operate a 900 acre grain farm in southern Livingston and northern Mclean counties. Two thirds of the acreage is devoted to continuous corn with one third in a corn/soybean rotation. Minimum tillage practices are used to leave at least 30% residue on the soil surface. Nitrogen is applied after the corn has emerged, and when the plant needs are the greatest, to minimize loss of nitrogen through leaching. Currently there are three test plots on the Steffen farm. Resource: Steffen Corn on Corn No-till Mosaic Microssentials® MESZ Right Source Mat ... more.

Strip Tillage Fall Nitrogen Application

We designed this study to demonstrate differences in nitrogen rates and yields under the same nitrogen product, where the producer planted corn for two consecutive growing seasons. We conducted this trial to: demonstrate strip till application of anhydrous ammonia, a proven conservation practice. demonstrate how the farmer can conduct his own on-farm NUE using field-scale equipment with minimal disruption of his normal field operations. show how RTK guidance and variable-rate application equipment can improve nitrogen application efficiency. show how RTK yield monitoring equipment works at harvest time. show how the ... more.

Demonstrations

... relative to... Read more. SUPERU SUPERU®, a urea based product, contains urease and denitrification inhibitors within the fertilizer granule. Koch Agronomic Services created SUPERU® to increase crops’ nitrogen uptake and efficiency.... Read more. Webinar: Engaging Non-operator Landowners in Conservation PowerPoint slides from Jamie Ridgely, chief operating officer of Agren, Inc. and presenter of Aug. 29 WIIN webinar on "Engaging Non-operator Landowners in Conservation." Read more.

SUPERU®

... Agronomic Services created SUPERU® to increase crops’ nitrogen uptake and efficiency. We designed this trial to determine the Most Economical Rate of Nitrogen (MERN) and to compare spring, surface applied urea verses spring applied SUPERU®. SUPERU® showed the highest agronomic efficiency of all the products compared in our NUE trials. When surface applied on no-till corn after corn, SUPERU®'s returned $106.00 more than the untreated urea. Take Home Lessons: In this demonstration, SUPERU® improved surface applied nitrogen uptake. Profits from nitrogen application increased by $106.00 with SUPERU®. SUPERU® improved economic yield. SUPERU® showed best agronomic efficiency of all products in trial.

SUPERU®

... Agronomic Services created SUPERU® to increase crops’ nitrogen uptake and efficiency. We designed this trial to determine the Most Economical Rate of Nitrogen (MERN) and to compare spring, surface applied urea verses spring applied SUPERU®. SUPERU® showed the highest agronomic efficiency of all the products compared in our NUE trials. When surface applied on no-till corn after corn, SUPERU®'s returned $106.00 more than the untreated urea. Take Home Lessons In this demonstration, SUPERU® improved surface applied nitrogen uptake. Profits from nitrogen application increased by $106.00 with SUPERU®. SUPERU® improved economic yield. SUPERU® showed best agronomic efficiency of all products in trial.

Cover Crops - An Essential Tool for Sustainable Cropping Sys

The use of cover crops is steadily increasing throughout the United States. Many no-till farmers consider cover crops to be the next step in conservation agriculture. Leaving the soil undisturbed and keeping something growing as many days as possible restores the natural cycles of the soils. Residues and roots create more organic matter in the soils. Increased organic matter serves as a food source to various soil organisms and increases the biological activity. Higher biological ... more.

Cover Crops - An Essential Tool for Sustainable Cropping Sys

The use of cover crops is steadily increasing throughout the United States. Many no-till farmers consider cover crops to be the next step in conservation agriculture. Leaving the soil undisturbed and keeping something growing as many days as possible restores the natural cycles of the soils. Residues and roots create more organic matter in the soils. Increased organic matter serves as a food source to various soil organisms and increases the biological activity. Higher biological ... more.

What’s happening at CTIC?

... Oregon Illinois Corn Growers Association Indiana Corn Marketing Council Indiana Soybean Alliance Innovation Center for U.S.Dairy Iowa Farm Bureau Federation IPNI James Lake John Deere Joseph Glassmeyer Land Pro LLC Larry Heatherly Michael Adsit Monsanto National Association of Conservation Districts National Corn Growers Association National Council of Farmer Cooperatives No-Till Farmer Scott Fritz Soil & Water Conservation Society Steve Bruere The Fertilizer Institute The Nature Conservancy Timothy Healey Truax Company, Inc. To renew, please email Crystal Hatfield at hatfield@ctic.org or call 765-494-9555.

Build Coalitions

... focus onimproving nutrient managementin Mississippi River Basin watersheds. CTIC led the formation of three collaborative groups, all including public and private members, to develop and oversee projects and programs in three regions: southern Minnesota, Missouri Bootheel and Upper Wabash River Watershed. To help producersintegrate cover crops and adopt a continuous no-till system, CTIC connected producers with crop consultants for customized assistance and brought in expertise from the Midwest Cover Crops Council.

Cover Crops - An Essential Tool for Sustainable Cropping Systems

The use of cover crops is steadily increasing throughout the United States. Many no-till farmers consider cover crops to be the next step in conservation agriculture. Leaving the soil undisturbed and keeping something growing as many days as possible restores the natural cycles of the soils. Residues and roots create more organic matter in the soils. Increased organic matter serves as a food source to various soil organisms and increases the biological activity. Higher biological ... more.

Strip Till Fall N Application

Keep nutrients in the Right Place, where crops can use them.

CTIC Exhibits at Ag Media Summit

... writers, editors,publishers, students and other exhibitors in conversation about conservation. David came prepared to share the insight he’s gained from attending all the Congressional Farm Bill markup sessions and talking with key players on both sides of the aisle. Several ag journalists took advantage of the opportunity to interview David. Farm Industry News, DTN, No-Till Farmer, Meister Media, AgWired, Progressive Farmer, Prairie Farmer and more stopped by to visit and learn more about our current projects as well as our upcoming anniversary celebration. CTIC members also exhibiting at InfoExpo proudly joined in celebrating our 30th year by displaying the CTIC logo at their booth. Thanks, Members! Many visit ... more.

SUPERU

... SUPERU® to increase crops’ nitrogen uptake and efficiency. We designed this trial to determine the Most Economical Rate of Nitrogen (MERN) and to compare spring, surface applied urea verses spring applied SUPERU®. SUPERU® showed the highest agronomic efficiency of all the products compared in our NUE trials. When surface applied on no-till corn after corn, SUPERU®'s returned $106.00 more than the untreated urea. Take Home Lessons In this demonstration, SUPERU® improved surface applied nitrogen uptake. Profits from nitrogen application increased by $106.00 with SUPERU®. SUPERU® improved economic yield. SUPERU® showed best agronomic efficiency of all produc ... more.

Strip Tillage Fall Nitrogen Application

We designed this study to demonstrate differences in nitrogen rates and yields under the same nitrogen product, where the producer planted corn for two consecutive growing seasons. We conducted this trial to: demonstrate strip till application of anhydrous ammonia, a proven conservation practice demonstrate how the farmer can conduct his own on-farm NUE using field-scale equipment with minimal disruption of his normal field operations show how RTK guidance and variable-rate application equipment can improve nitrogen application efficiency show how RTK yield monitoring&nb ... more.

Strip Tillage Fall Nitrogen Application

We designed this study to demonstrate differences in nitrogen rates and yields under different application times of the same nitrogen product, in an area where the producer planted corn for two consecutive growing seasons. We conducted this trial to: demonstrate strip till application of anhydrous ammonia, a proven conservation practice demonstrate how the farmer can conduct his own on-farm NUE using field-scale equipment with minimal disruption of his normal field operations show how RTK guidance and variable-rate application equipment can improve nitrogen application efficiency show how RTK yield monitoring equipmen ... more.

Pasture Planting

... not mix warm and cool season grasses in the same pasture. Selected grass and legumes should be compatible with the planned management. When only two grass species are selected, they should make up equal proportions of the seeding mixture. Add legumes to improve forage quality and extend the grazing season. Drill seed uniformly to a depth of 1/4 to 1/2 inch. Leave residues and till on the contour. If erosion is a problem, leave at least 30% residue cover after planting. Plant a nurse crop on steeper slopes or where weeds are a problem to get a good stand. NRCS recommends seeding oats at 1 to 1 1/2 bu./acre as a nurse crop. * Graze or closely chop pastures before reseeding. Apply a burndown herbicide. Maintenance Wait until pasture is well established to graze. ... more.

INDIAN CREEK FIELD TOUR JULY 7, 2011

... church then board a bus to visit the tour sites. Farmers and corporate sponsors at the sites will focus on effective agricultural systems while they showcase products, practices and technology that can boost profitable farming and improve water quality. Tour demonstrations will include nitrogen fertilizer split-application, slow release products, strip-till N application systems, and fertilizer use efficiency studies. These practices can improve both the farmer’s bottom line and water quality. Practices shown will emphasize the 4R cornerstones of nutrient management: use the Right source at the Right time, in the Right place at the Right rate. Producers can implement the four Rs and substantially reduce the amount of N fertil ... more.

15,000 ACRES OF COVER CROPS

CTIC recently received a Grant from EPA’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative that will fund the promotion of cover crops and conservation tillage in the Lake Erie, Lake Huron and Lake Michigan Watersheds. Agricultural producers will be provided with technical, educational and social support which will work together to create strong cover crop and conservation tillage systems that can be sustained after the project ends. Education CTIC will work with partners to host 18 workshops in the three watersheds (Lake Michigan Watershe ... more.

Better Soil, Better Yields

Better Soil, Better Yields This publication serves as a guidebook to improving soil organic matter and infiltration using continuous no-till.

Conservation In Action Tour 2010 "Best Tour Yet"

... thought this year’s tour was focused much more on solutions than merely on practices and that was GREAT!" "Meeting new friends in our business and seeing beautiful parts of the country. Great to see people out of Washington on Tour to learn more about agriculture." "The farmers — seeing and hearing how no-till works, the media hearing our story, the government officials having the 'live' experience." Conservation In Action Tour 2011 Mark your calendars for next year's Conservation In Action Tour, scheduled to take place in Northwest Ohio during the second week of August. Many thanks to this year's Conservatio ... more.

CTIC Cover Crop Initiatives

Using Cover Crops to Facilitate the Transition to Continuous No-Till Project Description Farmer Profiles

A Dozen Do's for Successful No Till Corn Following Soybeans

Equip Your Combine to Chop and Evenly Spread Residue..more

CIA Tour Promo 2010

... Archer Ruffin farm, to learn about carbon markets and profitable conservation, and to engage in a farmer panel focused on conservation; •Lunch at the Shirley Plantation, the oldest family-owned business in North America, featuring presentations about the Chesapeake Bay watershed; •A stop at Carter farm to learn about successful no-till cotton production in cool soil temperatures; The Shirley Plantation, Charles City, Virginia. Photo Courtesy of Charles Carter. •A visit to the Paul Davis farm to take part in a series of presentations on how agriculture will play a significant role in removing water quality impairments in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and what the Clean Water Act and ... more.

Tree Planting

... from surface runoff and increasing infiltration rates. Healthy, well-managed woodlands provide long-term wildlife habitat. Planning ahead Is the soil suitable for producing wood crops? Is the soil suitable for the tree species you have selected? Is there a market for the species you want to plant? Do you need this land for crops or livestock? Tech notes Remove brush and till the strips of pasture or sod where trees will be planted the fall before planting. Complete spring planting by May 15. Fall planting should begin between September 1-15. * Standard forest planting spacings are 6'x6', at a rate of 1,210 trees per acre; 6'x7', 1,037 trees per acre; 6'x8', 908 trees per acre. Tree seedlings should be planted within seven days of their a ... more.

Cover Crop Workshop (August 25, 2009)

Tuesday, August 25th 9am to 5pm East Main Street Christian Church Elwood, Indiana Presentations from the meeting are below: Cover Crops, No-till, and Soil Quality, Dan Towery Indiana Specific Niches, Dave Robison You have heard about the benefits of cover crops, now learn how to make them work! Spend the day with an all star cast of speakers from Purdue University, NRCS, Michigan State University, CISCO seeds and Ag Conservation Solutions and learn how to use cover crops on your operation. The Conservation Technology Inform ... more.

Partners Contribution June 2010

... improvements in environmental quality. Conservation districts’ work results in clean air, clean water, healthy habitat and productive soil. As you well know, it’s an exciting time for conservation in this country. Projects abound, and there is significant commitment from individual landowners, communities, lawmakers and funders to make improvements to our natural resources. We still have our challenges, but the time is right to make significant progress as stewards of the land. While continuing to fill many of our traditional roles, NACD and our member conservation districts are also exploring new opportunities and addressing new challenges. Earlier this year, I appointed a task force to study the issue of herbicide resistant weeds and the potential impact on conservat ... more.

A Look Back and a Glimpse into 2009

... water quality credit trading. The positive feedback we received on the format and content of the workshop was inspiring and will help us to deliver three more workshops in 2009. In September, CTIC was awarded a Conservation Innovation Grant from the Natural Resources Conservation Service(NRCS) for a project that promotes the use of cover crops to transition producers to a continuous no-till farming system. Working with partners in Ohio and Indiana, we are pairing producers and crop consultants to work together to identify and incorporate cover crops into their new system. We will track progress and report results as producers begin the transition in spring. Next year, we'll offer workshops and networking meetings to spark new ideas and information exchange among producers, consu ... more.

No Tillage: The relationship between no tillage, crop residues, plants and soil nutrition

No Tillage: The relationship between no tillage, crop residues, plants and soil nutrition Expands the breadth and depth of knowledge of the no-till system offers new ideas to those who are ready to move into the next level of conservation tillage systems. To order online, click here.

Webinar: TARGETED BMPS TO MAXIMIZE RUNOFF REDUCTION

... of conservation, agricultural lands for The Nature Conservancy, and Pat Sutter, county conservationist for the Dane County Land Conservation Division, will detail the process of targeting farms most likely to contribute the greatest phosphorus runoff into the Pecatonica, recruiting farmers, gathering baseline data and implementing conservation practices. Richter and Sutter will describe how no-till grew to encompass one-third of the watershed and document how nutrient management plans appealed to local producers by promising increased profitability while decreasing phosphorus runoff. The presentation will describe the project partners' roles, how the project started and lessons learned. Visit WIIN to learn more about the Pacatonica River project: www.ctic.org/WIIN/Project/109/home. The we ... more.

Corey Leis

Location Cashton, WI Documents No-tilling alfalfa into rye improves erosion control, Wisconsin Agriculturist, November 2, 2018 Images $(document).ready(function(){ $('#Corey_Leis_img img').on('click', function() { $('.enlargeImageModalSource').attr('src', $(this).attr('src')); $('#enlargeImageModal4').modal('show'); }); }); × Click the below images to enlarge them ... more.

Andy Shireman

Location Chapin, IL Documents No-tilling alfalfa into rye improves erosion control, Prairie Farmer, October 31, 2018 Images $(document).ready(function(){ $('#andy_shireman_img img').on('click', function() { $('.enlargeImageModalSource5').attr('src', $(this).attr('src')); $('#enlargeImageModal5').modal('show'); }); }); × Click the below images to enlarge them ... more.

Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS)

Automated Use of Remote Sensing Data to Monitor Conservation Practices The Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) has been developed by Applied GeoSolutions (AGS) and the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) as a method for the automated use of remote sensing (satellite-based) data to monitor conservation practices in agricultural systems, including various forms of reduced tillage and the planting of winter cover crops. While the OpTIS calculations are performed an ... more.

Data on Conservation Practices

... on the adoption of conservation practices across the U.S. Though federal support of the popular crop residue management transect survey ended in 2004, scientists, policy makers and marketers have continued to tap CTIC's databases. Now, we're at the forefront of using remote sensing to bring back state, regional and national data on crop residue and cover crop management. Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) The Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) has been developed by Applied GeoSolutions and CTIC as a method for the automated use of remote sensing (satellite-based) data to monitor conservation practices in agricultural systems, including various forms of reduced tillage and the planting of winter cover crops. Crop Residue Management Survey Data Sinc ... more.

No-tilling alfalfa into rye improves erosion control

Wisconsin Agriculturist, November 2, 2018

OpTIS: Where Technology Drives Conservation Results

... is estimated to exceed 9 billion people by 2050, placing unprecedented pressure on American farmers to grow even more of the crops that clothe, fuel and feed the world. One way to help alleviate this pressure is to significantly improvesoil healthon cropland. By adopting practices like planting winter cover crops and reducing—or better yet eliminating—tillage practices, farmers can significantly improve productivity of their fields, reduce soil erosion, improve water quality and increase carbon storage. In fact, agricultural soils are among the planet's largest reservoirs (orsinks) of carbon. Improving soil on American croplands has the potential to mitigate 25 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions. That’s the equivalent t ... more.

OpTIS: Plot Study and Next Step

Indiana Pilot Study Ten years of tillage-transect data collected by the State of Indiana were used to verify the ability of OpTIS algorithms to automatically process publicly-available remote sensing data, in order to accurately characterize tillage practices and the presence of winter cover crops. View Resource Next Step Building on the success of the Indiana Pilot, CTIC is now again partnering wit ... more.

Mission

CONNECT CTIC brings people together. We build coalitions. We connect farmers, researchers, policymakers, agribusiness, and lead discussions that move conversations ahead. INFORM CTIC is a clearinghouse for convservation information, from Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) regional trend data to how to implement practices on your farm. CHAMPION CTIC helps farmers, advisers, and ag retailers tap conservation resources. We promote conservation practices and advocate for policies that make them economically sustainable.

About

... negative effects on water quality in Indian Creek and downstream. Indian Creek Watershed The 82-square mile drainage area (52,480 acres) of Indian Creek Watershed flows to the South Fork of the Vermilion River, one of USDA’s Mississippi River Basin Initiative focus areas. Agriculture dominates the watershed – 95 percent of the land is tillable, most in a corn/soybean rotation, although there are numerous livestock operations. The average farm size is 500 acres. The City of Fairbury, the only urban population within the watershed, consists of approximately 4,000 people. The major resource concern for Indian Creek watershed is water quality, particularly nitrate levels. Located in the southern portion of Livingston County ... more.

2015 Tour Wrap-Up

... Crop Interseeding in Rice County" Stop #3 - Dave Legvold Farm, Northfield, Minn. Drainage water management, including a saturated buffer demonstration, and SWCD's role in buffers, highlighting Dakota County's Farmland and Natural Areas Program (FNAP) Download the handout Saturated Buffers: A new approach to water quality Impacts of reduced tillage on soil health and a demonstration of Soil Warrior strip-tillage equipment Download the handout Fine-Tuning Nitrogen Rates for Strip-Tilled Corn Download the handout Reduce Wind Erosion for Long Term Productivity Download the handout Considerations for Corn Residue Harvest in Minnesota Stop #4 - Phil and Nate ... more.

Demonstration: Slow Release Fertilizer

Herb and Aaron Steffen manage a 900-acre grain farm in southern Livingston and northern McLean counties. They hosted a demonstration and two nutrient use efficiency (NUE) trials. The Steffens plant corn continuously on two-thirds of the acres and rotate planting of corn and soybeans on the rest of the land. Their minimum tillage practices leave at least 30% of the previous crops’ residue on the soil surface. This residue decreases soil erosion and feeds nutrients back to the soil. They apply nitrogen after the corn plants emerge, when nutrient needs are the greatest. This minimizes nitrogen lost to air and water. To maximize efficiency, farmers must select the right nutrient source. A controlled-release ni ... more.

Demonstration: Nitrogen Application Timing

... Time Make nutrients available when crops need them Time the application Consider controlled release technologies and inhibitors Choose fertilizer product Right Place Keep nutrients where crops can use them Choose application method Incorporate fertilizer Use buffer strips Use conservation tillage Implement cover crop systems Right Rate Match amount of fertilizer to crop needs Test soils Yield goal analysis Crop removal balance Nutrient management planning Plant tissue analysis Record keeping Variable rate technology Site-specific management Sponsors ... more.

Strip Tillage Fall Nitrogen Application

CTIC Projects « Connecting People « Indian Creek Watershed Project « Strip Tillage Fall Nitrogen Application

CTIC project updates

Cover Crop Math The outcomes of our Cover Crop Math project, which was completed in September, are still being shared widely.Corn & Soybean Digestused one of the fourteen feature stories produced by CTIC as the publication’s cover story in April. The story features Illinois farmers John and Dean Werries. Several more of those feature stories are scheduled to run inCorn & Soybean Digestin the coming months, which includes their website. CTIC will also publish th ... more.

CTIC project updates

Cover Crop Math The outcomes of our Cover Crop Math project, which was completed in September, are still being shared widely.Corn & Soybean Digestused one of the fourteen feature stories produced by CTIC as the publication’s cover story in April. The story features Illinois farmers John and Dean Werries. Several more of those feature stories are scheduled to run inCorn & Soybean Digestin the coming months, which includes their website. CTIC will also publish th ... more.

CTIC project updates

... fits this description, contact Tammy Taylor attaylor@ctic.org OpTIS: CTIC is currently working with Applied GeoSolutions, a data analytics company based out of New Hampshire, to refine and implement a remote sensing-based system that estimates crop residue amounts and determines the presence or absence of cover crops on cropland. Through this technology, called the Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS), CTIC will lead the next phase of the Crop Residue Management (CRM) survey, which CTIC operated between 1989 and 2004. The current OpTIS project will collect crop residue and cover crops data from the U.S. Corn Belt between 2005 and 2017, filling gaps in tillage records that have widened since CTIC’s last national survey in 2004. In addition to d ... more.

CTIC project updates

... fits this description, contact Tammy Taylor attaylor@ctic.org OpTIS: CTIC is currently working with Applied GeoSolutions, a data analytics company based out of New Hampshire, to refine and implement a remote sensing-based system that estimates crop residue amounts and determines the presence or absence of cover crops on cropland. Through this technology, called the Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS), CTIC will lead the next phase of the Crop Residue Management (CRM) survey, which CTIC operated between 1989 and 2004. The current OpTIS project will collect crop residue and cover crops data from the U.S. Corn Belt between 2005 and 2017, filling gaps in tillage records that have widened since CTIC’s last national survey in 2004. In addition to d ... more.

CTIC Project Updates

... fits this description, contact Tammy Taylor at taylor@ctic.org. OpTIS: CTIC is currently working with Applied GeoSolutions, a data analytics company based out of New Hampshire, to refine and implement a remote sensing-based system that estimates crop residue amounts and determines the presence or absence of cover crops on cropland. Through this technology, called the Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS), CTIC will lead the next phase of the Crop Residue Management (CRM) survey, which CTIC operated between 1989 and 2004. The current OpTIS project will collect crop residue and cover crops data from the U.S. Corn Belt between 2005 and 2017, filling gaps in tillage records that have widened since CTIC's last national survey in 2004. In addition to ... more.

Ag Consulting Trainings

... and donuts at Stuttgart Public Library 8:30 AM—Bus departs for Terry Dabbs’ farm Outdoors on the farm Discovery Farms: Water quality monitoring as a driver of voluntary conservation adoption - Mike Daniels, Arkansas Discovery Farms (30 mins.) Dabbs Farm: Conservation practices used on the farm including a tail water recovery system and conservation tillage, experience with adopting them, and on-farm benefits - Terry Dabbs, Farmer & Michele Reba, ARS (75-90 min) 12:00 PM ~ (boxed lunch provided @ the farm) Return to Stuttgart Public Library around noon Topics of discussion The Stevens Farm: Precision irrigation and its place in a practical system. Impacts on productivity and water quality, including results ... more.

Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS)

The Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) has been developed by Applied GeoSolutions (AGS) and the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) as a method for the automated use of remote sensing (satellite-based) data to monitor conservation practices in agricultural systems, including various forms of reduced tillage and the planting of winter cover crops. While the OpTIS calculations are performed an ... more.

Projects side column (Cover Crop)

Ag Consultant Training in Systems that Protect Water Quality National Aquatic Resources Workshop National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) Cover Crop Surveys

Projects submenu (optis)

Ag Consultant Training in Systems that Protect Water Quality National Aquatic Resources Workshop National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) Operational Tillage Information System (OpTIS) Cover Crop Surveys

Indiana Pilot Study

Ten years of tillage-transect data collected by the State of Indiana were used to verify the ability of OpTIS algorithms to automatically process publicly-available remote sensing data, in order to accurately characterize tillage practices and the presence of winter cover crops.

Workshop

... and donuts at Stuttgart Public Library 8:30 AM—Bus departs for Terry Dabbs’ farm Outdoors on the farm Discovery Farms: Water quality monitoring as a driver of voluntary conservation adoption - Mike Daniels, Arkansas Discovery Farms (30 mins.) Dabbs Farm: Conservation practices used on the farm including a tail water recovery system and conservation tillage, experience with adopting them, and on-farm benefits - Terry Dabbs, Farmer & Michele Reba, ARS (75-90 min) 12:00 PM ~ (boxed lunch provided @ the farm) Arrive back at Stuttgart Public Library around noon Topics of discussion The Stevens Farm: Precision irrigation and its place in a practical system. Impacts on productivity and water quality, including res ... more.

Workshops

... AM - Check-in, coffee and donuts at Stuttgart Public Library 8:30 AM—Bus departs for Terry Dabbs’ farm Outdoors on the farm Discovery Farms: Water quality monitoring as a driver of voluntary conservation adoption - Mike Daniels, Arkansas Discovery Farms (30 mins.) Dabbs Farm: Conservation practices used on the farm including a tail water recovery system and conservation tillage, experience with adopting them, and on-farm benefits - Terry Dabbs, Farmer & Michele Reba, ARS (75-90 min) 12:00 PM ~ (boxed lunch provided @ the farm) Return to Stuttgart Public Library around noon Topics of discussion The Stevens Farm: Precision irrigation and its place in a practical system. Impacts on productivity and water quality, including results of on-farm ... more.

Stochastic dominance analysis of winter cover crop and nitrogen fertilizer systems for no-tillage corn.

This study evaluated how winter cover crops with various applied nitrogen rates affect net revenue and risk from no-tillage corn production. <span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%;Calibri" ,"sans-serif";times="" new="" roman";times="" roman";"="">Stochastic dominance analysis of winter cover crop and nitrogen fertilizer systems for no-tillage corn.

Economic analysis of the effects of winter cover crops on no-tillage corn yield response to applied nitrogen.

... through 1995 were used to estimate corn yield response functions for hairy vetch, crimson clover, winter wheat, and no cover alternatives. <span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%;Calibri" ,"sans-serif";times="" new="" roman";times="" roman";"="">Economic analysis of the effects of winter cover crops on no-tillage corn yield response to applied nitrogen.

WinMax

... for the national Farming for Maximum Efficiency program (The MAX®) sponsored byCTICand Successful Farming magazine. WinMax manages crop input data, calculates crop fertilizer recommendations, generates production cost and nutrient management worksheets, and allows sets of custom input costs to be created and used in all calculations. Various management options, such as tillage, pest control and fertilizer strategies, can be compared to help assess which practices are both economically efficient and environmentally sound. Visit WinMax site.

Nitrogen Application Timing

... Time the application + Consider controlled release technologies and inhibitors + Choose fertilizer product Right Place Keep nutrients where crops can use them + Choose application method + Incorporate fertilizer + Use buffer strips + Use conservation tillage + Implement cover crop systems Right Rate Match amount of fertilizer to crop needs + Test soils + Yield goal analysis + Crop removal balance + Nutrient management planning + Plant tissue analysis + Record keeping ... more.

Great Lakes Cover Crop Initiative Watershed Coordinators

A highly qualified crop consultant (watershed coordinator) has been identified in each watershed to provide one on one technical support to the producers who participate in this program. These people will meet with producers and help them make important decisions to ensure a successful transition to using a cover crop and conservation tillage system. Lake Michigan Coordinator Christina Curell Central Region Water Quality Educator, Mecosta 14485 Northland Drive Big Rapids, MI, 49307 Phone: (231) 592-0792 Cell: (231) 287-8617 Email: curellc@msu.edu Christina graduated from Michigan State University with ... more.

Slow Release Fertilizer

Herb and Aaron Steffen manage a 900-acre grain farm in southern Livingston and northern McLean counties. They hosted a demonstration and two nutrient use efficiency (NUE) trials. The Steffens plant corn continuously on two-thirds of the acres and rotate planting of corn and soybeans on the rest of the land. Their minimum tillage practices leave at least 30% of the previous crops’ residue on the soil surface. This residue decreases soil erosion and feeds nutrients back to the soil. They apply nitrogen after the corn plants emerge, when nutrient needs are the greatest. This minimizes nitrogen lost to air and water. To maximize efficiency, farmers must select the right nutrient source. A controlled-r ... more.

CONSERVATION TILLAGE SYSTEMS

Agricultural conservation systems produce good yields and strong profits while responsibly managing environmental resources. These systems efficiently manage nutrients and pests, control irrigation and drainage water flows, use cover crops, rotate crops to maximize conservation benefits and minimize equipment wear. See CTIC's conservation systems information sheet HERE.

Sidedress Phosphorus + MicroEssentials

... nutrition. It was side-dressed at two rates with a control plot where it was not applied. Operation Herb and Aaron Steffen, of Cropsey, Ill., operate a 900 acre grain farm in southern Livingston and northern Mclean counties. Two thirds of the acreage is devoted to continuous corn with one third in a corn/soybean rotation. Minimum tillage practices are used to leave at least 30% residue on the soil surface. Nitrogen is applied after the corn has emerged, and when the plant needs are the greatest, to minimize loss of nitrogen through leaching. Currently there are three test plots on the Steffen farm. >>More study details ... more.

Phosphorus Sidedress with MicroEssentials®

A soil test of the field showed a relatively low phosphorus level, so we demonstrated The Mosaic Company's MicroEssentials applied as a side-dress (plant nutrients placed on or in the soil near the roots of a growing crop to provide an additional boost in available phosphorus) in a corn after corn no-tilled field. The Mosaic Company designed MicroEssentials ® to allow uniform nutrient distribution and provide essential nutrients crops need in one granule, with two forms of sulfur for season-long nutrition. The MicroEssentials

A Review of BMPs for Managing Crop Nutrients and Conservation Tillage to Improve Water Quality

A Review of BMPs for Managing Crop Nutrients and Conservation Tillage to Improve Water Quality This publication will review research on nutrient management BMPs for the two nutrients of major concern, Nitrogen and Phosphorus, with an emphasis on integrating BMPs with conservation tillage.

Conservation Tillage and Plant Biotechnology

Conservation Tillage and Plant Biotechnology: How New Technologies Can Improve the Environment By Reducing the Need to Plow Introduces and outlines environmental benefits of conservation tillage, while highlighting trends that like biotechnology with conservation tillage.

Facilitating Conservation Farming Practices and Enhancing Environmental Sustainability with Agricultural Biotechnology

CTIC's new publication, Facilitating Conservation Farming Practices and Enhancing Environmental Sustainability with Agricultural Biotechnology. This publication explores the breadth of the environmental benefits of conservation tillage practices, which are facilitated significantly by biotechnology crops. Access the full document or executive summary to learn about the dramatic improvements in environmental sustainability and productivity over the past several years.

Remote Sensing Resources/links

Spying on Residue Remote Sensing of Crop Residue Cover and Soil Tillage Intensity Remote Sensing the Spacial Distribution of Crop Residues

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

... values each member,” says Karen Scanlon, executive director. “All of our successes, past and present, depend on the participation, input and support of our members.” In 1982, a group of agribusiness leaders, together with the National Association of Conservation Districts, formed CTIC to promote and provide information about conservation tillage. In the three decades since, CTIC has expanded its focus, increased and diversified its membership and worked with thousands of people across the country to advance conservation. Our members make it all possible. Thank you!

Great Lakes Cover Crop Initiative

... events. In addition to the outreach events, GLCCI coordinators are working in each watershed to give farmers one on one consultations to help them establish successful cover crops and learn to manage their systems to include growing acres of cover crops. In 2012 we have several events planned. We will be hosting a Farmer Networking Session at the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference in Ada, Ohio on March 6th. The Networking session will be at the end of a full day of cover crop presentations. Farmers and speakers are invited to gather at the Inn and discuss the information that has been presented throughout the day. Link to the CTC conference http://fabe.osu.edu/ctc/ If you are interested in sponsoring this event please contact Angie Williams 765 ... more.

UNDERSTANDING CONSERVATION TILLAGE SYSTEMS

... primary hypothesis is that the way in which information is presented will significantly affect farmers’ interest in and eventual adoption of offset-eligible practices. In many cases,it isbelieved thatthis framing effect will be as strong as or stronger than the effect of a modest offset payment. The information presented promotes conservation tillage with an environmental stewardship frame versus a neutral, control frame, and discussing the potential for offset payments for conservation tillage or not. As noted, we intend to determine if the framed treatments will generate greater interest in conservation tillage than unframed treatments, including unframed treatments that mention potential offset opportunities. Partner Purdue Univ ... more.

Trading Up for Water Quality

... think that when you try to encourage producers to implement water quality practices on their land, there’s some downside for producers,” Schafer says. “They need to apply for the practice, in terms of cost-share and technical assistance, they need to construct the practices themselves or hire it done, and they need to pay their portion of the cost-share. They sacrifice tillable acres, and they have to manage and maintain these systems and farm around them. There are significant issues that the producer could view as negative, yet these systems are largely for an off-farm, downstream benefit to the public.” However, he says, by providing credits for these systems, producers may be more likely to jump on board. “In order to encourage these pr ... more.

Cover Crops and Conservation Tillage

Cover Crops and Conservation Tillage Reduce NPS Pollution Project Description

Protecting the Environment

By facilitating the switch to conservation tillage, biotech crops have helped dramatically reduce soil erosion and water pollution, increase carbon sequestration, and lower the use of crop protection chemicals by millions of pounds per year.

Biotechnology

CTIC's new publication, Facilitating Conservation Farming Practices and Enhancing Environmental Sustainability with Agricultural Biotechnology, explores the breadth of the environmental benefits of conservation tillage practices, which are facilitated significantly by biotechnology crops. Access the full document and executive summary to learn about the dramatic improvements in environmental sustainability and productivity over the past several years. According to Dr. Norman Borlaug, the father of the Green Revolution, farmers must produce more food in the next 50 years than has been produced in the pa ... more.

National Tillage Trends 1990-2004

Conservation Tillage Types - over 30% cover after planting..more

Weed and Pest Management

... that allow for better control, with minimum risk to the environment. Resistant plants, cultural controls, soil amendments, beneficial insects, natural enemies, barriers, physical treatments, behavioral disruptants, biological and conventional pesticides are some of these management strategies. Increases Profits Inputs such as mechanical cultivation, pesticides, fertilizers and tillage trips cost money. By using best management practices to apply these inputs when they are actually needed, growers can reduce costs. Weed and pest management can help match the best method of control with the optimum time to maximize benefits of the control. Thus, weed and pest management can improve the bottom line for growers. Reduces Risks Weed and pest management results in fewe ... more.

Trading Up for Water Quality

... think that when you try to encourage producers to implement water quality practices on their land, there’s some downside for producers,” Schafer says. “They need to apply for the practice, in terms of cost-share and technical assistance, they need to construct the practices themselves or hire it done, and they need to pay their portion of the cost-share. They sacrifice tillable acres, and they have to manage and maintain these systems and farm around them. There are significant issues that the producer could view as negative, yet these systems are largely for an off-farm, downstream benefit to the public.” However, he says, by providing credits for these systems, producers may be more likely to jump on board. “In order to encourage these produc ... more.

Contour Farming

Farming with row patterns nearly level around the hill—not up and down hill. How it works Crop row ridges built by tilling and/or planting on the contour create hundreds of small dams. These ridges or dams slow water flow and increase infiltration which reduces erosion. How it helps Contouring can reduce soil erosion by as much as 50% from up and down hill farming. * By reducing sediment and runoff, and increasing water infiltration, contouring promotes better water quality. Planning a ... more.

April Research & Technology Briefs

Research & Technology Briefs Calculating Economic Returns for Conservation Tillage and Cotton Scientists at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) have improved the precision of calculating the costs and benefits of using conservation tillage in cotton production. Learn more at this web site: www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2009/090317.htm. EPA Announces Video Contest The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will award $2,500 to the winning video that ... more.

New Publication on Biotechnology

CTIC's new publication, Facilitating Conservation Farming Practices and Enhancing Environmental Sustainability with Agricultural Biotechnology, explores the breadth of the environmental benefits of conservation tillage practices, which are facilitated significantly by biotechnology crops. Access the full document and executive summary to learn about the dramatic improvements in environmental sustainability and productivity over the past several years. According to Dr. Norman Borlaug, the father of the Green Revolution, farmers must produce more food in the next 50 years than has been produced in the pas ... more.

Windbreak

... feet beyond that area. * Don't plant trees on the south or east side of a road. At mature height the trees will cast a shadow and prolong icy road conditions. * Keep plantings 20 to 30 feet away from phone or utility lines. Plant trees according to spacing recommendations for the species. Do not plant over septic leach fields. Maintenance Control competing vegetation with tillage or herbicides before planting and for the first three years after planting. Fence livestock out. Inspect regularly to help control damage. * Check local recommendations.

Water and Sediment Control Basin

... acres. * Build the basin large enough to control the runoff from a 10-year storm without overtopping. Install a tile or infiltration outlet. * Use fill material free if sod, roots, frozen materials and stones larger than 6 inches in diameter. It should also have correct moisture content for adequate compaction. Spacing for water and sediment control basins depends on the land slope, tillage and management system. Consult NRCS for recommended spacing. Maintenance Reseed and fertilize as needed to maintain vegetative cover. Check the basin after each large storm, and make any needed repairs. * Check local recommendations.

Grassed Waterway

... nurse crop, temporary cover or mulching may be necessary until permanent cover is established. Maintenance Lift implements out of the ground and shut off spray equipment when crossing. Don't use the waterway as a roadway. Fertilize as needed. Mow periodically, but wait until July 15 so young birds have a chance to leave the nest. * Maintain the width of the grass area when tilling surrounding fields. Avoid planting end rows along the waterway. This prevents a new gully forming on the outside edges of the waterway. * Check for local recommendations.

Cover Crop

... not allow cover crops to grow large enough to survive the winter. * Seed from the end of August until mid-September. * Cover crops may be air seeded prior to harvesting soybeans and other crops, or seeded conventionally after silage harvest. Many crops can be used for cover crops. Cereal rye is common. Kill cover crops in the spring. Mowing or herbicide application is acceptable. Tillage is not recommended because it will bury residue. Early kill is important to reduce the risk of depleting moisture needed for the grain crop. Legume cover crops add nitrogen to the soil, providing a low-cost fertilizer for grain crops. Follow the NRCS recommended seeding rates for the cover crop you select: * Crop lb./ac. Oats 70 Cereal rye 90 Winter wheat 90 Alfalfa 12 Sweet ... more.

Weed and Pest Management (IPM) Benefits

Weed & Pest Management (IPM) Benefits Increases Profits Inputs such as mechanical cultivation, pesticides, fertilizers and tillage costs money. By using best management practices to apply these inputs when they are actually needed, growers can reduce costs. Weed and pest management can help schedule required controls at the right time to maximize the benefits of the practice. Weed and pest management can improve the bottom line for growers. Reduces Risks Weed and pest management results in fewer pesticide applicat ... more.

Questions and Answers

... than abundant food, fiber and energy. They also expect agriculture to protect air, soil, water and wildlife. What do farmers need to do? Core 4 Conservation farmers all strive toward these goals and will achieve the results in the best way possible for their particular land and management abilities. Four of the key systems likely to be involved crop production include: Conservation Tillage Crop Nutrient Management Pest Management (IPM) Conservation Buffers What is different about this? Core 4 Conservation goes beyond talking about what agriculture is doing to protect the environment. It is a public way of showing that agriculture is taking responsibility to build on the environmentally sound management practices already used on the farm. This will be done by tracki ... more.

Conservation Tillage Systems and Management Handbook

Conservation Tillage Systems and Management Handbook The 29 chapters not only cover a broad range of topics, but the authors represent all regions of the United States. The right book for those with a basic understanding of conservation tillage who want to expand their technical knowledge.

What are Conservation Buffers?

... http://www-agecon.ag.ohio-state.edu/faculty/bsohngen/bmp/filter.htm#grass Conservation planning with the Core 4 approach. As each year passes, we improve our understanding of how to manage for better soil, cleaner water, greater profits and a brighter future. We call this management approach the Core 4. The four fundamental components integrated into this approach are: Conservation Tillage; Crop Nutrient Management; Weed and Pest Management; and Conservation Buffers. If you’d like to learn more about the Core 4 approach, call your local agronomic and/or natural resources professional: * Agricultural Retailer * Certified Crop Advisor * Conservation District * Extension Agent * Independent Crop Consultant * Natural Resources Conservation Service

Georgia Conservation Tillage Alliance

Georgia Conservation Tillage Alliance The mission of the Georgia Conservation Tillage Alliance is to promote the adoption of conservation tillage and other economically viable and environmentally sound agricultural and natural resource management practices through research, education, and communication. Contact Information www.gcta-ga.org

California Conservation Tillage Workgroup

Established 1998 The purpose of the Conservation Tillage Workgroup is to 1) develop knowledge and exchange information on conservation tillage production systems, 2) coordinate related research and extension programs, 3) respond to needs for information on reduced tillage production alternatives, and 4) plan and conduct statewide and regional conferences, workshops and training demonstrations as well as produce UC Division of Agriculture and Natural ... more.

Alberta Reduced Tillage LINKAGES

Established 1994 Reduced Tillage LINKAGES (RTL) is an extension organization that focuses on increasing the adoption of sustainable production systems, based on reduced tillage, by Alberta farmers and ranchers. The program is a partnership with broad-based farmer, industry, educational, wildlife, and government support and employs five agronomists. Mission, Goals and Contact Information Mission Statement: To be th ... more.

Integrated Manure Management: Good Neighbors, Good Business

... of manure. They’ve designed and built application equipment to deliver manure to the soil as directly and odor-free as possible, with minimal disturbance of surface crop residues. When Dave and Chris get going, they can cover 6 to 11 acres an hour, delivering as much as 7,500 gallons of manure per acre at up to 3.5 mph. On a 22-foot toolbar, they mounted heavy Genesis Tillage aeration tines at a 7-degree offset in front of huge nozzles to create what Dave Beard calls a “poke, lift, squirt” surface-application system. On another toolbar, the family mounted 11 straight coulters on 22-inch centers, each followed by a 12-inch Dietrich sweep with an injector. The result: quick, accurate placement of manure 4 to 6 inches below the soil surface. ... more.

Anaerobic Digesters: A Community Approach

Three thousand cows in Tillamook, Ore., power 150 homes with their manure, collected and processed through the Port of Tillamook Bay’s community digester. Leftover liquid is returned to participating farms for land application. Photo courtesy of Steve Werblow Anaerobic Digesters: A Community Approach by Steve Werblow Three thousand cows in Till ... more.

Exploring Biotechnology

Agricultural biotechnology delivers more than just streamlined pest management options or the promise of healthier, higher quality crops. Biotech-derived crops allow growers to adopt sustainable farming practices ranging from conservation tillage to integrated pest management. Those practices protect soil, water and air quality and allow producers to sustain our natural resources as well as our lives and lifestyles. The Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC), with funding from the United Soybean Board, has produced Facilitating Conservation Farming Practices and Enhancing Environmental Sustainability with Agricultural B ... more.

Illinois Soybean Association

We live our values by making sustainability goals part of everything we do throughout the soybean lifecycle - from soil to seed to marketplace. Our environmental stewardship programs encourage reduced tillage as well as other tactics to improve energy efficiency, water conservation, water and air quality, and a variety of best management practices.