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Search result for keyword "No-Till". 101 results found.

No-tilling alfalfa into rye improves erosion control

Wisconsin Agriculturist, November 2, 2018

Adding Cover Crops to a No-Till System

Dan Forgey, farm manager at Cronin Farms in South Dakota, has been using no-till management for more than 17 years. Over that time, Forgey has developed a keen understanding of how his farming system works and where new challenges and opportunities exist. The Next Step: Adding Cover Crop to a No-Till System (Video)

Biological and biochemical soil properties in no-till corn with different cover crops.

... in many positive ways. These include higher total carbon, which usually contributes to increased cation exchange capacity and water-holding capacity. <span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%;Calibri" ,"sans-serif";times="" new="" roman";times="" roman";"="">Biological and biochemical soil properties in no-till corn with different cover crops.

Stochastic dominance analysis of winter cover crop and nitrogen fertilizer systems for no-tillage corn.

This study evaluated how winter cover crops with various applied nitrogen rates affect net revenue and risk from no-tillage corn production. <span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%;Calibri" ,"sans-serif";times="" new="" roman";times="" roman";"="">Stochastic dominance analysis of winter cover crop and nitrogen fertilizer systems for no-tillage corn.

Economic analysis of the effects of winter cover crops on no-tillage corn yield response to applied nitrogen.

... 1986 through 1995 were used to estimate corn yield response functions for hairy vetch, crimson clover, winter wheat, and no cover alternatives. <span style="font-size:11.0pt;line-height:115%;Calibri" ,"sans-serif";times="" new="" roman";times="" roman";"="">Economic analysis of the effects of winter cover crops on no-tillage corn yield response to applied nitrogen.

Soil Agronomy-No-Till Management

During the first 3-4 years of a no-till system, the soil biology and chemistry undergoes several significant changes. No-Till Management- Nitrogen Management

USING COVER CROPS TO FACILITATE THE TRANSITION TO CONTINUOUS NO-TILL

This project, funded by a 2008 Conservation Innovation Grant, promotes the use of cover crops to ease farmers’ transition to use of continuous no-till. Continuous no-till (CNT) has been around long enough that there is little doubt among experts of its many advantages. Despite the proven economic and environmental benefits of CNT, some farmers remain hesitant to fully adopt the system. In 2004, the National Crop Residue Management survey indicated that only 22.6 percent of farmers were no-tilling. Attempting CNT without proper technical knowled ... more.

No-Till Farming Systems & Companion CD

No-Till Farming Systems The highly anticipated World Association of Soil and Water Conservation - Special Publication No. 3 - No-Till Farming Systems book has been released in the United States. As co-publisher, CTIC is honored to be the designated U.S. distributor. "No-till farming systems have been developed and applied around the world over several decades. The technology is dynamic: it ... more.

No-till Farmer

CTIC Institutional Member, No-Till Farmer, provides the management information for farmers interested in and practicing reduced tillage techniques. To learn more about No-Till Farmer, visit www.no-tillfarmer.com/

No-Till 2011 Conference

The No-Till 2011 Conference is a program of innovative speakers providing for maximum interaction between agriculture professionals ranging from producers to industry experts. No-Till 2011 is a conference designed to bring the latest developments in no-till cropping systems to interested farmers and ranchers from Oklahoma and surrounding states. For more details, view the conference brochure. ... more.

Fast vs. Fuel - The New No-Till Debate

Tilling this quarter section of cornstalks in a three-pass program could consume 404 gallons of diesel and take 37 hours. Spraying with a burndown herbicide for a no-till program cuts it back to 20 gallons of fuel and two hours of time. Photo courtesy of Steve Werblow Fast vs. Fuel - The New No-Till Debate By Steve Werblow Skyrocketing fuel and fertilizer bills have tempered some of the enthusiasm over unprecedented commodity prices. It seems like the perfect storm to push a no-till agenda – the ... more.

Using Cover Crops to Facilitate the Transition to Continuous No-Till

Using cover crops and continuous no-till together in a conservation system over time maximizes soil health and may lead to yield increases and other benefits. Photo courtesy of CTIC Using Cover Crops to Facilitate the Transition to Continuous No-Till Why this project? Using cover crops and continuous no-till together in a conservation ... more.

Experts Dispute Study That Relates No-Till to Algae Problem

Phosphorus runoff contributes to the shoreline of Lake Erie accumulating algae. Photo courtesy of EPA Experts Dispute Study That Relates No-Till to Algae Problem Rachel Doctor Last spring, a study conducted by Hiedelberg College's water lab in Tiffin, Ohio, reported that no-till farming was contributing to the dissolved phosphorus that enters the water supply and causes an accumulation of algae in Lake Erie. According to Norm Widman, national agronomist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), ... more.

Brian Lindley, No-Till on the Plains, Inc.

CTIC Member Since 2001 Initially, No-Till on the Plains, Inc., joined CTIC for the information exchange, networking and notification of pertinent meetings. I believe these have been great benefits of our membership. In addition, I enjoy and utilize the articles and research and technology information found in CTIC’s online magazine, Partners. The benefits far exceed the cost of membership in CTIC. What a beneficial organizatio ... more.

2024 Conservation in Action Tour

Conservation Technology Information Center's Conservation in Action Tour Join us June 10-11 in Arkansas! Are you ready to embark on a journey through the lush landscapes of Arkansas, where conservation comes to life? Join us for the Conservation Technology Information Center's (CTIC) Conservation in Action Tour, an immersive experience showcasing cutting-edge practices and innovatio ... more.

Helpful Links

... Tillage Conservation Practices—Adoption Crop Residue Management (CRM) Survey Drainage Water Management Cover Crops Cover Crop Survey Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) Demonstration Projects Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) Grazing and Rangeland Hypoxia Know Your Watershed Leadership Mississippi River Basin Initiative (MRBI) No-Till National Aquatic Resource Survey (NARS) National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) Nutrient Management Operational Tillage Assessment System (OpTIS) Pasture Ridge Till Soil Health Strip Till Tours Training Water Quality Watershed Groups Watershed Implementation and Innovation Network (WIIN) Weed Management Wetlands

PLUS-UP

... in the Western Lake Erie Basin (Maumee, Sandusky, and Cedar-Portage watersheds, see map). Growers within the indicated watersheds are now being sought to participate in this pilot market. The “Phosphorus Load-Reduction Stimulation Program” (PLUS-UP) payments now being offered to growers are intended to help offset their costs for the use of in-field practices—cover crops and no-till—which yield quantifiable reductions in the amount of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) delivered to the adjacent surface water bodies that drain to Lake Erie. CTIC’s partner in the program, Heidelberg University, is quantifying the reductions for each participating grower using the Nutrient Tracking Tool (NTT) model and reporting this to CTIC. CTIC will provide cash payments to the ... more.

NEW COVER CROP SURVEY DATA CHALLENGES ASSUMPTIONS

... educational programs, policy planning and even testimony to Congress. "The National Cover Crop Survey goes beyond acreage statistics by providing insights into what farmers want to achieve with cover crops, what motivates them to try and continue the process, how cover crops relate to other soil-building practices like no-till, and their approaches to using the practice," says Ryan Heiniger, executive director of CTIC. "We are also just as interested in the perspectives of non-users of cover crops. Understanding their concerns and information needs provide direction for developing better outreach materials, and can help policymakers clear obstacles that hamper adoption or create more attractive incentives.&qu ... more.

Cover Crops - An Essential Tool for Sustainable Cropping Sys

The use of cover crops is steadily increasing throughout the United States. Many no-till farmers consider cover crops to be the next step in conservation agriculture. Leaving the soil undisturbed and keeping something growing as many days as possible restores the natural cycles of the soils. Residues and roots create more organic matter in the soils. Increased organic matter serves as a food source to various soil organisms and increases the biological activity. Higher biological ... more.

Past Tours

... with their crop adviser, Clint Nester, CCA. This video was featured in the American Society of Agronomy's Sustainable Agronomy Conference on August 20, 2020. Cover Crop Lessons Over the years, the Vollmer and Sanders families have learned valuable lessons about making cover crops work on their fields. Watch the video below for their insights. No-Till: Worth the Wait Learning to no-till the cool, heavy soils of the Western Lake Erie Basin can be frustrating, but Kenny Vollmer and Clint Nester describe how the challenge has been worth the wait. Inspiration from Off the Farm Both Ryan and Carrie work off the farm, too, and find that visiting other operations has provided inspiration and ideas for conservation systems at ho ... more.

The Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) Inducts Frank Lessiter Into Its Hall of Fame

... of Fame during the 16th Annual CTIC Conservation in Action Tour on Tuesday night, July 11, 2023 in Frankenmuth, Michigan. CTIC is a hub for information and ideas that advance and promote conservation agriculture systems that help people along the agricultural supply chain achieve their economic and environmental sustainability goals. Hall of Fame Frank Lessiter has served as editor of No-Till Farmer for 51 years, since the publication was launched in 1972. He and wife, Pam, acquired No-Till Farmer and established Lessiter Media in Brookfield, Wis., to acquire the magazine in 1981. Today, the 40-person company also publishes Strip-Till Farmer and Cover Crop Strategies and has run the National No-Tillage Conference since 1993. The Conservation in Action tour is a homecoming for Lessi ... more.

COPY

... future is so bright we've got to wear shades! Membership Drive: Reach New Horizons With CTIC In 2022, the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) celebrated 40 years of Conservation in Action. That's four decades of bringing a wide range of people to the table to advance conservation agriculture...from our early projects promoting no-till to our current programs that help farmers, conservationists, agribusiness professionals, academics and policymakers protect soil health, water quality and the atmosphere. In 2023, CTIC will continue that legacy as the trusted source for data on conservation farming practices, the coordinator of demonstration projects, a builder of local capacity, and a partner in developing high-impa ... more.

Membership

Membership Drive: Reach new horizons with CTIC In 2022, the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) celebrated 40 years of Conservation in Action. That's four decades of bringing a wide range of people to the table to advance conservation agriculture...from our early projects promoting no-till to our current programs that help farmers, conservationists, agribusiness professionals, academics and policymakers protect soil health, water quality and the atmosphere.In 2023, CTIC will continue that legacy as the trusted source for data on conservation farming practices, the coordinator of demonstration projects, a builder of local capacity, and a partner in developing high-impact education o ... more.

Plus-UP News 4Rs Training Newsletter

... the value of a pound of DRP at $100, a measure of the environmental damage it can cause and the cost of trying to remove it from water supplies to prevent it from enlarging the harmful algal blooms (HABs) that plague Lake Erie. DRP also feeds plants, so every pound of DRP that leaves a field is depriving the crop of vital nutrients. By piloting PLUS-UP, we demonstrated that no-till and cover crops can significantly reduce the off-farm movement of DRP into surface waters. Judy Smith and Dr. Laura Johnson at Heidelberg University's National Water Quality Research Center demonstrated with their models that slope and soil type dramatically impact DRP loss from a field—a vital insight that can help us target DRP credits and BMP (best management practice) efforts where ... more.

Conservation in Action NEWS August 2022

... details the PLUS-UP program by overlaying facts about the pilot project over an ArcGIS map of the Western Lake Erie Basin. The story map, created by Roger Meyer and Kevin Stark of Geospatial Services team at St. Mary's University of Minnesota, is a dynamic exploration of the challenges of nutrient enrichment in the basin, the PLUS-UP pilot project, and the role of cover crops and no-till in reducing the off-target flow of DRP. Click here to explore the map on the CTIC website. This project has been funded wholly or in part by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under assistance agreement 00E02797 to the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC). The contents of this document do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the E ... more.

CTIC Celebrates 40th Anniversary

CTIC will be celebrating its 40th Anniversary this year, looking back at the evolution of the organization—and of conservation agriculture in America—and looking forward to the next 40 years of the organization's mission. Over the years, CTIC has progressed from a strong focus on no-till and reduced tillage to a broader approach to economic and environmental sustainability that grew to include water and air quality, soil health, and climate-smart agriculture. Through it all, CTIC has been a clearinghouse for information and a hub for bringing a wide range of people together to share insights and ideas on making conservation farming systems more successful. The 40th A ... more.

PLUS-UP Program Pays; Ohio Meetings Aug. 22 and 23

The Phosphorus Load-Reduction Stimulus (PLUS-UP) Program is paying 10 growers this summer for reducing dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) loads in the Western Lake Erie Basin on 104 fields covering more than 5,300 acres. Payments average $9.12 per acre. The program, which emphasizes the role of no-till and cover crops in reducing the off-farm movement of DRP into surface waters, is detailed in this interactive story map. CTIC and The Andersons will host a 4Rs Nutrient Stewardship meeting in Maumee, Ohio, on August 23. A PLUS-UP stakeholder workshop will be held the following day in Toledo, Ohio. Watch this link for details. With a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protec ... more.

From the Project Director

... costs like drinking water treatment and indirect ones like damage to tourism and the fishing industry. To help drive this pilot effort to develop a procedure for understanding, incentivizing and reducing DRP in surface waters, The Bayer Carbon Program stepped up to underwrite the DRP credits. In turn, we are delivering those funds to program farmers as stimulus payments for no-till and cover crops—two practices that can significantly reduce the off-farm movement of dissolved reactive phosphorus. PLUS-UP is driven by science. Our partners at Heidelberg University's National Center for Water Quality Research are using data from each participating farm to model the amount of DRP that is being retained on PLUS-UP fields. Based on those results, the farmer ... more.

From the Project Director - Komp

... costs like drinking water treatment and indirect ones like damage to tourism and the fishing industry. To help drive this pilot effort to develop a procedure for understanding, incentivizing and reducing DRP in surface waters, The Bayer Carbon Program stepped up to underwrite the DRP credits. In turn, we are delivering those funds to program farmers as stimulus payments for no-till and cover crops—two practices that can significantly reduce the off-farm movement of dissolved reactive phosphorus. PLUS-UP is driven by science. Our partners at Heidelberg University's National Center for Water Quality Research are using data from each participating farm to model the amount of DRP that is being retained on PLUS-UP fields. Based on those results, the farmer ... more.

PLUS-UP Progress

... Quality Research at Heidelberg University. The Heidelberg team will use those details to calculate the effect of each farmer's conservation practices on dissolved reactive phosphorus loading in the watershed. Farmers will be paid according to the amount of DRP their conservation practices retained on their land. For our inaugural year, we chose to focus on cover cropping and no-till. We also encourage farmers to apply the 4Rs of Nutrient Stewardship—the right source, right rate, right time and right place—which can also significantly reduce the off-target movement of phosphorus and other nutrients. CTIC is accepting wait list applications for future years of the PLUS-UP program. Click here to learn more or sign up.

‘Farmers in the Western Lake Erie Basin Can Earn Money in New CTIC Phosphorus Reduction Pilot Program’

... Lake Erie Basin—including parts of Ohio, Michigan and Indiana—can earn money through a phosphorus load reduction pilot program. The “Phosphorus Load-Reduction Stimulation Program” (PLUS-UP) program, coordinated by the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC), will pay farmers in the project area $5 to $10 per acre in 2022 to reduce P loads using practices such as no-till or cover crops. "The PLUS-UP program will provide a financial incentive for conservation practices that help farmers reduce phosphorus loading in the Lake Erie watershed, keep their nutrients where their crops can use them, and build soil health," says Hans Kok, CTIC program director. "Bayer Crop Science has purchased phosphorus credits to provide these PLUS-UP incentives, a ... more.

JOIN CTIC OR RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP TODAY!

For four decades, CTIC has brought a remarkable range of people to the table to talk about conservation agriculture. Nowhere else is there such a great opportunity to meet policy makers, agribusiness leaders, farmers, researchers, conservation specialists, crop consultants and others...all drawn together by a mutual interest in conservation technologies that are better for farmers and be ... more.

2019 Members

... throughout the entire corn industry, the U.S. government, and consumers and throughout the world. National Council of Farmer Cooperatives ncfc.org Made up of regional and national farmer cooperatives, the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives works to advance the business and policy interests of America's cooperatives and other farmer-owned enterprise. No-Till Farmer www.no-tillfarmer.com Since 1972, No-Till Farmer has been delivering the latest information through magazines, newsletters, books, reports and conferences. No-Till Farmer provides valuable ideas, services and products to help farmers that are interested in any aspect of no-tillage farming. Ohio No-till Council ohionotillcouncil.com The Ohio No-Till Council was formed in ... more.

OpTIS Data Available for Iowa, Illinois and Indiana

... program manager, Iowa Corn Growers Association. “Utilizing remote sensing technology that is ground-truthed allows us to see the entire picture of conservation practice adoption, and the results show that we are making progress.” Data Results Using publicly-available, remote sensing data from Landsat and Sentinel 2 satellites to monitor the adoption rate of no-till, conservation tillage, and cover crops, the current round of OpTIS analysis for Illinois, Indiana and Iowa represents about 1 billion acre-years of agricultural conservation practices. The data show: Adoption of winter cover crops—non-cash crops growing over the winter—is increasing. Across the three states, cover crops planted after corn and soy increased by nearly 2 million ac ... more.

IPCC Land Report Highlights Importance of Implementing and Tracking Conservation Practices

By adopting conservation practices like cover crops and reduced tillage or no-till, farmers can help reduce the effects of climate change, including soil erosion, declining land productivity and desertification, according to Climate Change and Land, a report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released today. More than 100 experts from 52 countries contributed to the report. Mike Komp, executive director of the Conservation Technology Informatio ... more.

Parting Thoughts On The Future of Conservation Agriculture

... I pass the CTIC reins to Mike, I offer some parting thoughts on the future of conservation in US row crop agriculture. In doing so, I realize some of what I have to say could be regarded as controversial, so let me be very clear that these are my words alone, and not those of CTIC. There’s good news and bad news. The good news is that practices like cover crops and continuous no-till have tremendous potential to deliver a future of improved soil and water conservation outcomes. But the bad news is that this future is now imperiled by rising levels of aggressive litigation targeted against agriculture, such as (1) the 2015 Des Moines Water Works lawsuit (eventually dismissed in 2017 after two years of costly legal wrangling); (2) a second March 2019 lawsuit against the State o ... more.

OpTIS Data for Indiana Available; More States' Data Coming Soon

A massive new data set chronicling residue management and winter cover crop use in Iowa, Illinois and Indiana from 2005 through 2018 is now in the final stages of preparation for release on CTIC's website. The resource—the Operational Tillage Information System, or OpTIS—uses publicly available remote sensing data to monitor the adoption of no-till, conservation tillage, and winter cover crops. Data covering the rest of the Corn Belt, extending from eastern Ohio to eastern Kansas and Nebraska and from the Missouri Bootheel to the Red River Valley of North Dakota, will be available in the next few weeks. Analyzing satellite images of the landscape through software devel ... more.

Project Farmers in the News

Corn and Soybean Digest: All In On Cover Crops Nitrogen Cycling and Cover Crops Time Is Money Landowners Support Cover Crops Penton Agriculture Magazines: Cover Crop Success With Each Season Comes New Lessons Stick With It A Seed Corn, Covers Duet Farmers Join Nat'l Study on Cover Crops Other Sources: No-Till, Cover Crops from a Farmer's Point of View

2010 Tour Wrap-Up

... YOU!" "I thought this year’s tour was focused much more on solutions than merely on practices and that was GREAT!" "Meeting new friends in our business and seeing beautiful parts of the country. Great to see people out of Washington on Tour to learn more about agriculture." "The farmers — seeing and hearing how no-till works, the media hearing our story, the government officials having the 'live' experience." Conservation In Action Tour 2011 Mark your calendars for next year's Conservation In Action Tour, scheduled to take place in Northwest Ohio during the second week of August. Many thanks to this year's Conservation In Action Tour sponsors. Tou ... more.

2009 Tour Wrap-Up

... the diversity of the group attending." "What a fantastic day! It's wonderful to see so many groups working together for a great cause. Great hosts, great food, great conversation. I hope this tour continues and grows every year!" Learning from the land stewards who share their experiences." "In-field look at practices implemented by farmers doing no-till and strip-till. Networking with other growers." "Great day! Very informative and everyone was well prepared and organized." "Interaction between different groups and views with the same goal in mind." "Getting the chance to learn about efficiency practices in development and practice." "Interacting with people from many different sta ... more.

Strip Till Nitrogen Application

... in the Right Place, where crops can use them. The farmer uses real-time kinematic precision guidance to apply N fertilizer in fall or early spring in a closely-controlled location relative to where the seed will be sown. Strip-till conservation systems use minimal tillage. They combine soil drying and warming benefits of conventional tillage and soil-protecting advantages of no-till by disturbing only the portion of soil that will contain the seed row. Here we are using fall applied N with an RTK strip-till system and comparing it to a conventional chisel plow system. A special feature at this site is the demonstration of N use efficiency (NUE) rate comparison, done with field-scale equipment, so that the farmer can apply the rate treatments and harvest the plots with ... more.

Corey Leis

Location Cashton, WI Documents No-tilling alfalfa into rye improves erosion control, Wisconsin Agriculturist, November 2, 2018 Images $(document).ready(function(){ $('#Corey_Leis_img img').on('click', function() { $('.enlargeImageModalSource').attr('src', $(this).attr('src')); $('#enlargeImageModal4').modal('show'); }); }); × Click the below images to enlarge them ... more.

CTIC Launches New Conservation Information Website

... they have all brought to the table." Gustafson adds that the internet offers a perfect tool for CTIC's information-sharing efforts. "Back in the early '90s, before the world wide web and browsers, we were trying to craft systems that would use dial-in messaging capabilities of the time to allow people to find the information they were looking for on no-till and crop residue management," he notes. "At the time, it was cutting edge, though now it seems so primitive. Today, we can use the web to deliver documents, videos, data—anything people could want to know about conservation systems. It's the perfect time for us to create a new site and put people in touch with our treasure trove of information." # ... more.

Andy Shireman

Location Chapin, IL Documents No-tilling alfalfa into rye improves erosion control, Prairie Farmer, October 31, 2018 Images $(document).ready(function(){ $('#andy_shireman_img img').on('click', function() { $('.enlargeImageModalSource5').attr('src', $(this).attr('src')); $('#enlargeImageModal5').modal('show'); }); }); × Click the below images to enlarge them ... more.

CROP RESIDUE MANAGEMENT SURVEY

... Management Survey is a valuable tool that can be used to measure adoption of important soil-saving practices, demonstrate energy cost savings and monitor efforts to improve the environment. The Survey has been compiled and tracked by CTIC since 1982 and is the only survey in the U.S. to measure and track the type of tillage used by crop at the county level. Tillage methods tracked include no-till, ridge-till, reduced-till and intensive/conventional tillage, according to NRCS definitions. Project Partners State offices of the Natural Resources Conservation Service, local NRCS field offices, Conservation Districts and Extension offices Project Description The nationwide survey of conservation tillage practices started as a partnership effort between CTIC an ... more.

Sidedress Phosphorus + MicroEssentials

... to continuous corn with one third in a corn/soybean rotation. Minimum tillage practices are used to leave at least 30% residue on the soil surface. Nitrogen is applied after the corn has emerged, and when the plant needs are the greatest, to minimize loss of nitrogen through leaching. Currently there are three test plots on the Steffen farm. Resource: Steffen Corn on Corn No-till Mosaic Microssentials® MESZ Right Source Match fertilizer type to crop needs Select appropriate nutrient sources for cropping system Test soils Consider N, P, K secondary and micronutrient Consider enhanced efficiency fertilizers Plan nutrient regimen Right Time Make nutrients available when crops need them ... more.

SUPERU®

... Agronomic Services created SUPERU® to increase crops’ nitrogen uptake and efficiency. We designed this trial to determine the Most Economical Rate of Nitrogen (MERN) and to compare spring, surface applied urea verses spring applied SUPERU®. SUPERU® showed the highest agronomic efficiency of all the products compared in our NUE trials. When surface applied on no-till corn after corn, SUPERU®'s returned $106.00 more than the untreated urea. Take Home Lessons: In this demonstration, SUPERU® improved surface applied nitrogen uptake. Profits from nitrogen application increased by $106.00 with SUPERU®. SUPERU® improved economic yield. SUPERU® showed best agronomic efficiency of all products in trial.

SUPERU®

... Agronomic Services created SUPERU® to increase crops’ nitrogen uptake and efficiency. We designed this trial to determine the Most Economical Rate of Nitrogen (MERN) and to compare spring, surface applied urea verses spring applied SUPERU®. SUPERU® showed the highest agronomic efficiency of all the products compared in our NUE trials. When surface applied on no-till corn after corn, SUPERU®'s returned $106.00 more than the untreated urea. Take Home Lessons In this demonstration, SUPERU® improved surface applied nitrogen uptake. Profits from nitrogen application increased by $106.00 with SUPERU®. SUPERU® improved economic yield. SUPERU® showed best agronomic efficiency of all products in trial.

Cover Crops - An Essential Tool for Sustainable Cropping Sys

The use of cover crops is steadily increasing throughout the United States. Many no-till farmers consider cover crops to be the next step in conservation agriculture. Leaving the soil undisturbed and keeping something growing as many days as possible restores the natural cycles of the soils. Residues and roots create more organic matter in the soils. Increased organic matter serves as a food source to various soil organisms and increases the biological activity. Higher biological ... more.

What’s happening at CTIC?

... Oregon Illinois Corn Growers Association Indiana Corn Marketing Council Indiana Soybean Alliance Innovation Center for U.S.Dairy Iowa Farm Bureau Federation IPNI James Lake John Deere Joseph Glassmeyer Land Pro LLC Larry Heatherly Michael Adsit Monsanto National Association of Conservation Districts National Corn Growers Association National Council of Farmer Cooperatives No-Till Farmer Scott Fritz Soil & Water Conservation Society Steve Bruere The Fertilizer Institute The Nature Conservancy Timothy Healey Truax Company, Inc. To renew, please email Crystal Hatfield at hatfield@ctic.org or call 765-494-9555.

National Crop Residue Management Survey

The National Crop Residue Management (CRM) Survey is the only survey in the U.S. to measure at the county level the type of tillage used by crop. Tillage methods tracked are: no-till, mulch-till, reduced-till, and conventional tillage. Click here to see the tillage definitions. Available Data Data is available online from 1989 to 2008. Some of the data can be accessed without a password (unsecured data) and the rest requires a log in and password (secured data). Passwords are given to institutional and corporate members of CTIC. Read more information about how to become ... more.

Build Coalitions

... groups focus onimproving nutrient managementin Mississippi River Basin watersheds. CTIC led the formation of three collaborative groups, all including public and private members, to develop and oversee projects and programs in three regions: southern Minnesota, Missouri Bootheel and Upper Wabash River Watershed. To help producersintegrate cover crops and adopt a continuous no-till system, CTIC connected producers with crop consultants for customized assistance and brought in expertise from the Midwest Cover Crops Council.

Cover Crops - An Essential Tool for Sustainable Cropping Systems

The use of cover crops is steadily increasing throughout the United States. Many no-till farmers consider cover crops to be the next step in conservation agriculture. Leaving the soil undisturbed and keeping something growing as many days as possible restores the natural cycles of the soils. Residues and roots create more organic matter in the soils. Increased organic matter serves as a food source to various soil organisms and increases the biological activity. Higher biological ... more.

FACILITATING CONSERVATION FARMING PRACTICES AND ENHANCING ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY WITH AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY

... are facilitated significantly by biotechnology crops. The publication, reviewed by a panel of experts, shows the dramatic improvements in environmental sustainability and productivity over the past several years. Among many important statistics, the document describes: The projected growth of the global population to 9 billion by 2040 The 69 percent increase in no-till farming since the 1996 introduction of herbicide-resistant crops A drop in herbicide usage of 47.4 million pounds of active ingredient where herbicide-tolerant soybeans or cotton were planted in the U.S. in 2007 The replacement of 8.67 million pound of insecticide active ingredient in 2007 where U.S. growers planted insect-resistant cotton and corn varieties Reductions in soil l ... more.

The Great Crop Rotation Cover-Up

Josh Lloyd tries to do "what Mother Nature does" on his farm near Clay Center, Kansas. That means a no-till system combined with the planting of a polyculture of cover crops -- turnips, radishes and canola -- in rotation with his sorghum and wheat acres. Caldwell, Jeff. 2009. The great crop rotation cover-up. Agriculture Online. Using Cover_crops SAG 08 09 This is a literature review of cover crop benefits from Dabney et al. 2001 and Dabney 1996. Oilseed_Radish ... more.

Strip-till Nitrogen

... crops can use them. The farmer uses real-time kinematic precision guidance to apply N fertilizer in fall or early spring in a closely-controlled location relative to where the seed will be sown. Strip-till conservation systems use minimal tillage. They combine soil drying and warming benefits of conventional tillage and soil-protecting advantages of no-till by disturbing only the portion of soil that will contain the seed row. Here we are using fall applied N with an RTK strip-till system and comparing it to a conventional chisel plow system. A special feature at this site is the demonstration of N use efficiency (NUE) rate comparison, done with field-scale equipment, so that the farmer can apply the rate tre ... more.

CTIC Exhibits at Ag Media Summit

... writers, editors,publishers, students and other exhibitors in conversation about conservation. David came prepared to share the insight he’s gained from attending all the Congressional Farm Bill markup sessions and talking with key players on both sides of the aisle. Several ag journalists took advantage of the opportunity to interview David. Farm Industry News, DTN, No-Till Farmer, Meister Media, AgWired, Progressive Farmer, Prairie Farmer and more stopped by to visit and learn more about our current projects as well as our upcoming anniversary celebration. CTIC members also exhibiting at InfoExpo proudly joined in celebrating our 30th year by displaying the CTIC logo at their booth. Thanks, Members! Many visit ... more.

COVER CROPS AND CONSERVATION TILLAGE REDUCE NONPOINT SOURCE POLLUTION

... into their operation, to evaluate the changes and adapt management to optimize yield and resource protection. By providing this three-tiered support, this project builds producer capacity to effectively manage, adapt and commit to the long-term implementation of these conservation practices. Partners U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Midwest Cover Crops Council, Ohio No-Till Council, The Ohio State University, Purdue University, Michigan State University, Indiana Conservation Cropping Systems Initiative Activities The project includes the following activities: CTIC will host 18 workshops promoting the use of cover crops with continuous no-till. The first workshops will be in January 2011. Three crop consultants will contact producers ... more.

Phosphorus Sidedress with MicroEssentials®

A soil test of the field showed a relatively low phosphorus level, so we demonstrated The Mosaic Company's MicroEssentials applied as a side-dress (plant nutrients placed on or in the soil near the roots of a growing crop to provide an additional boost in available phosphorus) in a corn after corn no-tilled field. The Mosaic Company designed MicroEssentials ® to allow uniform nutrient distribution and provide essential nutrients crops need in one granule, with two forms of sulfur for season-long nutrition. The MicroEssentials

SUPERU

... SUPERU® to increase crops’ nitrogen uptake and efficiency. We designed this trial to determine the Most Economical Rate of Nitrogen (MERN) and to compare spring, surface applied urea verses spring applied SUPERU®. SUPERU® showed the highest agronomic efficiency of all the products compared in our NUE trials. When surface applied on no-till corn after corn, SUPERU®'s returned $106.00 more than the untreated urea. Take Home Lessons In this demonstration, SUPERU® improved surface applied nitrogen uptake. Profits from nitrogen application increased by $106.00 with SUPERU®. SUPERU® improved economic yield. SUPERU® showed best agronomic efficiency of all produc ... more.

Conservation In Action Tour 2011 Post-Tour News Release

Two Hundred Visited Northwest Ohio Farms Mark Scarpitti, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, left, demonstrates how no-till soil (in container on right) absorbs water while heavily tilled soil erodes quickly under water. This absorption capability protects no-till ground from erosion. CTIC photo. More than 200 farmers, government officials, agribusiness, university and non-profit organization representatives toured Northwest Ohio on Aug. 9, 2011, to see agricultural conservation in action. ... more.

CONSERVATION AGRICULTURE SYSTEMS ALLIANCE (CASA)

... member organizations Influence policy on a broad level Current CASA Members Conservation Tillage Workgroup (California) Delta Conservation Demonstration Center (Mississippi) Georgia Conservation Tillage Alliance Innovative Cropping Systems (Virginia) Manitoba-North Dakota Zero Tillage Farmers Association Mexican Conservation Tillage Association No-Till on the Plains Ohio No-Till Council Pacific Northwest Direct Seed Association Pennsylvania No-Till Alliance Saskatchewan Soil Conservation Association Soil Conservation Council of Canada Southern Plains Agricultural Resources Coalition (Oklahoma) Vantage Activities This year, CTIC has facilitated monthly teleconferences for CASA, maintained the CASA web page and ... more.

Understanding Conservation Tillage Systems Resources

Find the following CTIC resources in the Free Download section of CTIC’s Online Store. Better Soil, Better Yields is a guidebook to improving soil organic matter and infiltration with continuous no-till. Facilitating Conservation Farming Practices and Enhancing Environmental Sustainability with Agricultural Biotechnology explores environmental benefits of conservation tillage, facilitated significantly by biotechnology crops. A Review of BMPs for Managing Crop Nutrients and Conservation Tillage to Improve Water Quality reviews research on nutrient best management practices (BMPs) ... more.

Better Soil, Better Yields

Better Soil, Better Yields This publication serves as a guidebook to improving soil organic matter and infiltration using continuous no-till.

Conservation In Action Tour 2010 "Best Tour Yet"

... thought this year’s tour was focused much more on solutions than merely on practices and that was GREAT!" "Meeting new friends in our business and seeing beautiful parts of the country. Great to see people out of Washington on Tour to learn more about agriculture." "The farmers — seeing and hearing how no-till works, the media hearing our story, the government officials having the 'live' experience." Conservation In Action Tour 2011 Mark your calendars for next year's Conservation In Action Tour, scheduled to take place in Northwest Ohio during the second week of August. Many thanks to this year's Conservatio ... more.

CTIC Cover Crop Initiatives

Using Cover Crops to Facilitate the Transition to Continuous No-Till Project Description Farmer Profiles

Switching to Conservation Tillage

Biotech crops have reduced the risks and challenges of switching to conservation tillage or no-till practices. Since glyphosate-tolerant crops were introduced in 1996, acreage of no-till full-season soybeans in the U.S. has increased by nearly 70%. Click here to see the data.

Tillage Type Definitions

... may include the use of cover crops after low residue producing crops. CRM includes all field operations that affect residue amounts, orientation and distribution throughout the period requiring protection. Site-specific residue cover amounts needed are usually expressed in percentage but may also be in pounds. CRM is an “umbrella” term encompassing several tillage systems including no-till, ridge-till, mulch-till, and reduced-till. Conservation Tillage Types (30 percent or more crop residue left, after planting). Any tillage and planting system that covers 30 percent or more of the soil surface with crop residue, after planting, to reduce soil erosion by water. Where soil erosion by wind is the primary concern, any system that maintains at least 1,000 pounds per acre of fla ... more.

Conservation Tillage Photos and Graphics

... These soybeans were planted in narrower (15-inch) rows because as they mature their big leaves will quickly shade the ground, making it harder for the sun to warm weed seeds that may lie between the rows. This natural canopy from the growing soybean plants can help farmers reduce the need for herbicides (weed killers). Size: 671 x 1000 pixels (253k) Source: CTIC/ Dan Towery No-till: Anchor farmer is using a drill (another name for a very narrow row planter) to plant a new crop amid the corn stalks left from the old harvest (no-till). Drills are used to plant small grain seeds like wheat and rye. Farmers also use them to plant soybeans and take advantage of the (ultra narrow) 7.5-inch rows to provide natural weed protection and higher yielding crops. 1000 x 671 pixels&nbs ... more.

Soil Quality: More than a Soil Test

... activity increases temporarily and microorganisms rapidly decompose organic matter. Mike Hubbs (left), agronomist with NRCS, collecting core sample for bulk density while waiting on respiration test. This high rate of biological activity in a system of low residue inputs decreases soil organic matter. Less organic matter degrades overall soil quality. A no-till system with crop rotations and/or cover crops balances decomposition with organic matter inputs from crop roots and residues, providing a more stable system. As a result, organic matter levels are maintained, or even increased, and biological activity is improved. High respiration with high inputs indicates good soil quality. “Crop rotations, cover crops, no-till or conservation til ... more.

Top 10 Conservation Tillage Benefits

... hours per year. That’s almost four 60-hour weeks. 2. Saves fuel Save an average 3.5 gallons an acre or 1,750 gallons on a 500-acre farm. 3. Reduces machinery wear Fewer trips save an estimated $5 per acre on machinery wear and maintenance costs—a $2,500 savings on a 500-acre farm. 4. Improves soil tilth A continuous no-till system increases soil particle aggregation (small soil clumps) making it easier for plants to establish roots. Improved soil tilth also can minimize compaction. Of course, compaction is also reduced by reducing trips across the field. 5. Increases organic matter The latest research shows the more soil is tilled, the more carbon is released to the air and the less carbon is a ... more.

Crop Nutrient Management Facts

... other biological activity in the soil feeds on the stalks, leaves and other crop residues. This increases organic matter, improves soil tilth and, ultimately increases soil productivity. Why is soil quality important? Better soil retains more moisture for dry periods, yet the improved structure speeds natural infiltration in wet spots. In the Great Plains, continuous no-till conserves 2-4" of soil moisture annually when compared to intensive tillage systems. In other areas, it improves water infiltration after the soil reaches its maximum water holding capacity. The improved soil structure also reduces compaction enabling plant roots to be stronger, healthier. Cleaner water Soil erosion can be reduced by 90% (compared ... more.

Conservation Tillage

... activity in the soil feeds on the stalks, leaves and other crop residues. This increases organic matter, improves soil tilth and, ultimately increases soil productivity. Why is soil quality important? Better soil retains more moisture for dry periods, yet the improved structure speeds natural infiltration in wet spots. In the Great Plains, continuous no-till conserves 2-4" of soil moisture annually when compared to intensive tillage systems. In other areas, it improves water infiltration after the soil reaches its maximum water holding capacity. The improved soil structure also reduces compaction enabling plant roots to be stronger, healthier. Cleaner water Soil erosion can be reduced by 90% (compared to intensive ... more.

CIA Tour Promo 2010

... Archer Ruffin farm, to learn about carbon markets and profitable conservation, and to engage in a farmer panel focused on conservation; •Lunch at the Shirley Plantation, the oldest family-owned business in North America, featuring presentations about the Chesapeake Bay watershed; •A stop at Carter farm to learn about successful no-till cotton production in cool soil temperatures; The Shirley Plantation, Charles City, Virginia. Photo Courtesy of Charles Carter. •A visit to the Paul Davis farm to take part in a series of presentations on how agriculture will play a significant role in removing water quality impairments in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and what the Clean Water Act and ... more.

Cover Crop Workshop (August 25, 2009)

Tuesday, August 25th 9am to 5pm East Main Street Christian Church Elwood, Indiana Presentations from the meeting are below: Cover Crops, No-till, and Soil Quality, Dan Towery Indiana Specific Niches, Dave Robison You have heard about the benefits of cover crops, now learn how to make them work! Spend the day with an all star cast of speakers from Purdue University, NRCS, Michigan State University, CISCO seeds and Ag Conservation Solutions and learn how to use cover crops on your operation. The Conservation Technology Inform ... more.

CASA Conference Call February 2010

... at each meeting. Planning spring tours. Rolling out grower-to-grower information network, funded by small grant. NTOP: NTOP conference on Jan 27-28 with more than 1,200 attend. More exhibitors than ever and more first-time attendees. Speakers included Bill K, Jerry L, Moe Russell of Russell Consulting (Iowa). Invited APPRESID to send person; Jose Moreno came and discussed protocols of no-till certification program. Looking at certification program and how it can be used in “put teeth” into NTOP message. Also working to take over one of KSU research farms, in heart of typical Kansas soil. Preparing for grower meeting in March; Dave Brandt coming back to attend and speak. NRCS –Bill: still want effort to get RUSLE 2 databases (which are updated for cover crops ... more.

Research and Tech Briefs June 2010

... Unilever, it's easy to use and gives instant results that invite users to try out alternatives and ask 'what if' questions. The University of Aberdeen, commissioned by Unilever, designed the tool for farmers, supply chain managers and companies interested in quantifying their agricultural carbon footprint and finding practical ways of reducing it. Study Demonstrates No-Till Improves Soil Stability A joint Agricultural Research Service (ARS)-multi-university study across the central Great Plains, on the effects of more than 19 years of various tillage practices, shows that no-till makes soil much more stable than plowed soil. The study was led by Humberto Blanco-Canqui at Kansas State Universityat Hays, Kan., and Maysoon Mikha at the ARS Central Gre ... more.

Success Story June 2010

... Crops Work with Various Crop Production Systems By Jason Johnson According to a panel of Iowa farmers, agronomists and soil conservationists, cover crops such as rye, wheat and clover are environmentally beneficial and with proper management won’t inhibit yields on various crop production systems, including no-till and organic farming. At a recent Cover Crops Workshop in Jefferson, Iowa, dozens gathered to discuss and learn more about the many benefits and varieties of cover crops, and ways to successfully plant and manage them. Research by the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment (NLAE) shows cover crops planted in the fall between h ... more.

Date and Location Set for 2009 Conservation in Action Tour

... engrossed group of Conservation In Action Tour participants listens to a discussion at one of the Beck's Hybrids seed company's greenhouses. Photo Courtesy of Purity Mason Side-by-side demonstration models at Rulon Enterprises show how ground water appears in a conventional tilled field (left) versus a no-till field (right) with residue on the soil surface. Photo Courtesy of Purity Mason At Lamb Farms, drywall scrap from construction projects is ground into gypsum and spread on fields as a soil amendment. Photo courtesy of Randall Reeder Participants in the Conservation In Action Tour view a auto r ... more.

Conservation In Action Tour 2009

... a fantastic day! It's wonderful to see so many groups working together for a great cause. Great hosts, great food, great conversation. I hope this tour continues and grows every year!" "Learning from the land stewards who share their experiences." "In-field look at practices implemented by farmers doing no-till and strip-till. Networking with other growers." "Great day! Very informative and everyone was well prepared and organized." "Interaction between different groups and views with the same goal in mind." "Getting the chance to learn about efficiency practices in development and practice." "Interacting w ... more.

CTIC News

... owned and operated by the Hula family, living proof that profitability and natural resources conservation go hand in hand; the Archer Ruffin farm for discussions about agriculture’s responsibility for stewardship, carbon markets and profitable conservation; lunch at the Shirley Plantation, the oldest family-owned business in North America; the Carter farm where no-till cotton grows successfully in cool soil temperatures; and a series of presentations at the Paul Davis farm. These will include how agriculture will play a significant role in removing water quality impairments in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and what Clean Water Act and Total Maximum Daily Load regulations could mean to agriculture and the region. The day will end with a stea ... more.

Research and Technology Briefs

... field conditions and with a wide range of crops. To learn more, or to download or purchase a copy of this manual, visit www.sare.org/publications/croprotation.htm. Farmers can take steps to reduce manure pathogens in runoff Scientists with The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center say farmers who apply manure as a fertilizer to their no-till field can decrease the chance that pathogens end up in runoff, which can pose environmental and health hazards. These researchers studied the transport of Cryptosporidium – a parasite present in animal waste – through no-till and tilled fields. They found that a greater amount of the parasite moved along with excess water through no-till fields and into tile drains than in till ... more.

John Deere Advances Stewardship in Agriculture

... low-disturbance injection technology to place anhydrous ammonia beneath the soil surface. It uses 30 percent less fuel and disturbs the soil less than traditional shank and knife application. “The 2510H gives producers a way to apply nitrogen closer to the time of crop need and uptake,” Bradley says. “This is a big piece of the sustainability picture. And, for no-till producers, this is great. Many no-till producers haven’t been able to use the lowest-cost form of nitrogen – anhydrous ammonia – because conventional methods of applying anhydrous can cause too much soil disturbance.” “Coupled with Deere’s PitStop Pro™ tendering system, the 2510H makes planned side-dress applications more feasible and profitable th ... more.

4R Nutrient Stewardship: Why Now?

... such as global positioning systems, satellite or aerial images, and information management tools help farmers assess the variability of a field and, in turn, allow for a more accurate determination of fertilizer and agricultural input needs. Variable rate technology allows different rates of fertilization, seeding and secondary application of nutrients. Additional BMPs, including no-till and low-till systems, conservation buffers and nitrate reducers, are being implemented. Cover crops are also being used to hold the soil in place and prevent erosion, while reducing a crop’s overall nitrogen needs through bacterial fixation. Whether farmers rely upon their own knowledge or the agronomic expertise of a fertilizer retailer, certified crop advisor (CCA), farm ma ... more.

Conservation Reserve Program - Exit Strategies

A group of agriculture and conservation stakeholders in the Pacific Northwest is working to devise strategies that will ease the transition of land protected under the Conservation Reserve Program to no-till production system. Photo courtesy of CTIC Conservation Reserve Program – Exit Strategies By Russ Evans In the rain-fed region of the inland Pacific Northwest (PNW) – especially the dryer, low rainfall regions that rely on summer fallow – the regular calls for Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) signup were m ... more.

Lessening the Pain

The residue left on the field and the soil structure improved with a no-till cropping system may also give producers an advantage in this cold, wet harvest season. Photo courtesy of CTIC Lessening the Pain For farmers choosing no-till, this fall’s wet harvest has been a bit less painful By Christy Couch Lee What a year it’s been. It began with a cold, wet planting seas ... more.

More Acres Can Also Mean More Conservation

Schroeder planted corn into soybean residue without disturbing the soil. No-till helps reduce erosion, saves time and money, and improves water and soil quality. Photo courtesy of Jason Johnson More Acres Can Also Mean More Conservation By Jason Johnson As the number of Iowa farmers decreases and the average farm size increases, that can mean more conservation on the ground – especiall ... more.

Apply gypsum to your fields to balance soil structure, Improve nutrient uptake, and yield heartier, healthier crops

... thinner, many growers are getting back to basics by applying gypsum (calcium sulfate), which helps improve the structure and balance of their soil. Improving your business from the ground up—and down Gypsum has been used for centuries as a soil additive. Its use has been widespread in Europe, and it is growing in popularity in the United States. Gypsum is especially popular in no-till systems, because of the marked improvement in soil structure and decrease in soil compaction. There are three ways to obtain gypsum. It can be mined, but this method is not usually readily available or cost-effective. The second method is to reclaim and recycle gypsum products, including drywall from new construction projects. The final method is to collect the calcium sulfate that is the b ... more.

CTIC Welcomes New Members

... and ranch land conservation, American Farmland Trust (AFT) works with communities and individuals to protect the best land, plan for agriculture and keep the land healthy. The mission of AFT is to help farmers and ranchers protect their land, produce a healthier environment and build successful communities. www.farmland.org/ Ohio No-Till Council The Ohio No-Till Council was formed in 1994 through the efforts of 10 no-till farmers. The statewide organization now has more than 285 members, including farmers and other agribusiness professionals. The Council publishes its research findings and other helpful communications through the Ohio No-Till News page of Ohio's Country Journal ( www.ocj.com ). In addition, the ... more.

International Meeting Spotlights Conservation Agriculture's Role in Mitigating Climate Change

... 30. Bringing experts from an array of disciplines, from soil science to economics, to focus on carbon sequestration was a bold move to use science and markets to promote opportunities for farmers around the world. “To create working markets for farmers' efforts to capture atmospheric carbon, we need to understand the science of how carbon acts in the soil, and the science behind no-till systems,” said Karen Scanlon, executive director of CTIC. “With that insight, we can quantify the effect that farmers have with specific practices and on specific soils, and create a fair compensation structure for those effects.” A Working Meeting After sharing their research results and field experiences from six continents, the participants spent several hours at the ... more.

A Look Back and a Glimpse into 2009

... water quality credit trading. The positive feedback we received on the format and content of the workshop was inspiring and will help us to deliver three more workshops in 2009. In September, CTIC was awarded a Conservation Innovation Grant from the Natural Resources Conservation Service(NRCS) for a project that promotes the use of cover crops to transition producers to a continuous no-till farming system. Working with partners in Ohio and Indiana, we are pairing producers and crop consultants to work together to identify and incorporate cover crops into their new system. We will track progress and report results as producers begin the transition in spring. Next year, we'll offer workshops and networking meetings to spark new ideas and information exchange among producers, consu ... more.

Conservation in Action Tour 2009

... a fantastic day! It's wonderful to see so many groups working together for a great cause. Great housts, great food, great conversation. I hope this tour continues and grows every year!" Learning from the land stewards who share their experiences." "In-field look at practices implemented by farmers doing no-till and strip-till. Networking with other growers." "Great day! Very informative and everyone was well prepared and organized." "Interaction between different groups and views with the same goal in mind." "Getting the chance to learn about efficiency practices in development and practice." ... more.

Crop Residue Management

Leaving last year's crop residue on the soil surface by limiting tillage. Includes no-till, mulch-till and ridge till. How it works Leaving last year's crop residue on the surface before and during planting operations provides cover for the soil at a critical time of the year. The residue is left on the surface by reducing tillage operations and turning the soil less. Pieces of crop residue shield soil particles from rain and wind until plants can produce a protective canop ... more.

Wildlife Food Plot

... steeper than 5% should be planted on the contour. A plot can be planted on the same area each year as long as soil loss does not exceed acceptable limits. Accepted crops include: corn, sorghum, oats, barley, wheat, sunflower, buckwheat, millet, partridge pea and soybeans. * Soybeans and sunflowers can not be used in Conservation Reserve Program food plots. * Reduced till or no-till planting in encouraged. Maintenance Exclude livestock Don't control weeds with herbicides unless noxious weeds persist. If herbicides are needed, spot spray. Avoid using herbicides that would endanger adjacent seedings. * Criteria may need to be adjusted for local conditions.

What is a Crop Nutrient Management Plan?

... Soil test. How much of each nutrient (N-P-K and other critical elements such as pH and organic matter) is in the soil profile? The soil test is a key component needed for developing the nutrient rate recommendation. 3. Crop sequence. Did the crop that grew in the field last year (and in many cases two or more years ago) fix nitrogen for use in the following years? Has long-term no-till increased organic matter? Did the end-of-season stalk test show a nutrient deficiency? These factors also need to be factored into your plan. 4. Estimated yield. Factors that affect yield are numerous and complex. Your field’s soils, drainage, insect, weed and disease pressure, rotation and many other factors differentiate one field from another. This is why using historic yields is im ... more.

No Tillage: The relationship between no tillage, crop residues, plants and soil nutrition

No Tillage: The relationship between no tillage, crop residues, plants and soil nutrition In his second book on no-till farming, Chilean farmer Carlos Crovetto has delved into the inner workings of the soil and meticulously explained the relationship between no-till, crop residues, soil nutrition and crop production.

Don't miss the CTIC Conservation In Action Tour 2008

... to see first-hand how conservation works on Indiana farms. We invite you to be a part of this informative and noteworthy event. The tour, sponsored by Specialty Fertilizer Products (SFP), showcases successful farmers who have mastered innovative conservation practices in their profitable operations. Starkey Farms Partnership , Brownsburg, Indiana • 8 years of continuous no-till • Gradually incorporated 200 acres of annual ryegrass as cover crop • Gypsum added as a soil amendment to improve soil structure and infiltration • Tile Nitrogen outflow monitored by a local university because the farm is within a watershed that supplies drinking water to nearby Indianapolis Lamb Farms , Lebanon, Indiana • 84% of corn and soybeans are no-till o ... more.

No Tillage: The relationship between no tillage, crop residues, plants and soil nutrition

No Tillage: The relationship between no tillage, crop residues, plants and soil nutrition Expands the breadth and depth of knowledge of the no-till system offers new ideas to those who are ready to move into the next level of conservation tillage systems. To order online, click here.

Southern Plains Agricultural Resources Coalition (SPARC)

Southern Plains Agricultural Resources Coalition (SPARC) Established 2006 The Southern Plains Agricultural Resources Coalition will spark rural sustainability and profitability through greater use of no-till practices and conservation systems for producers, consumers, and communities by promotion of market based incentives, education, demonstration, participation, and research. Mission, Goals and Contact Information Mission Statement The Southern Plains Agricultural Resources Coalition will spark rural sustainability and profitability through greater use of no-till practices and conse ... more.

Research and Technology Briefs Dec 2008 II

... is just the beginning, Kladivko says. MCCC plans to add a cover crop selection tool — a hands-on learning module to help farmers select the cover crop that would benefit them the most. CTIC is assisting MCCC in the development of the cover crop selection tool. That tool is part of a three-year, two-state project, called Using Cover Crops to Facilitate the Transition to Continuous No-Till, funded by a 2008 Conservation Innovation Grant awarded to CTIC by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. CTIC and MCCC, along with The Ohio State University, Ohio No-Till Council, Purdue University, Michigan State University, Ag Conservation Solutions and the Owen County Soil and Water Conservation District will work with four farmers in Indiana and four farmers in Ohio to assist them ... more.

Timothy J. Healey, Agrotain International, LLC

CTIC Member since 2003 Initially, Agrotain International joined CTIC to be affiliated with an organization that promoted no-till agriculture directly to farmers, to increase name recognition of our products with producers, and to provide product for demonstration purposes in areas where CTIC was promoting no-till agriculture. We win farmers as customers one at a time, and we were hoping that the affiliation with CTIC would give us more opportunity for direct contact with more producers. Heretofore we saw the benefits ... more.